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Permission Marketing
by Seth Godin
Elif Koral
Master MOI
2015/2016
Title: Permission Marketing
Author: Seth Godin
Publishe...
The future core of marketing relies in creating anticipated, personal and relevant messages to
consumers who have “given p...
According to Permission Marketing, most marketers are trying to keep mass media alive by
finding odder places to advertise,...
build a series of communication channels. While building a communication strategy, one
must take into account that; the me...
companies begin to leverage the investment, the harder it will grow. Giving is far more
important than taking, especially ...
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Permission marketing de Seth Godin - Recension d'Elif Koral - M2 MOI

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Découvrez l'une des meilleures recensions du Master 2 Marketing Opérationnel International : Permission marketing de Seth Godin, rédigé par Elif Koral

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Permission marketing de Seth Godin - Recension d'Elif Koral - M2 MOI

  1. 1. Permission Marketing by Seth Godin Elif Koral Master MOI 2015/2016 Title: Permission Marketing Author: Seth Godin Publisher: Simon & Schuster UK Ltd Place of Publication: London Date of First Publication: 1999 !1
  2. 2. The future core of marketing relies in creating anticipated, personal and relevant messages to consumers who have “given permission”. Seth Godin, in his book Permission Marketing, challenges the preconceived notions about marketing and advertising while introducing two concepts: Interruption and Permission marketing. He further elaborates on these two concepts, by discussing how they should be handled by organisations, and what does the future hold for them. According to Godin, “the internet is going to change marketing, and old marketing will die in its path”. So in fact, throughout the book, permission marketing1 presents itself as a fundamentally different way of thinking about advertising and consumers. The author begins with the idea that the most valued asset of any consumer is time. Due to this fact, interruptive TV ads or phone calls no longer work. Instead of annoying consumers by stealing their most valued asset (time), tomorrow’s marketer will first try to gain the consumer’s consent to participate in the selling process. This can be achieved through an engaging dialogue and an interactive relationship with the consumer, by giving them a “bait”: a benefit, prize or information in exchange for their time and permission. Through reaching out to only individuals who are interested in a product or service, permission marketing will enable companies to develop long-term relationships with consumers while building trust, creating brand awareness, and improving their chances to make a sale. Godin states that “for ninety years marketers have relied on one form of advertising almost exclusively”. Furthermore, he makes a definition of advertising as “the science of creating2 and placing media that interrupts the consumer and then gets him or her to take some action”. In fact, this is interruption marketing: the traditional approach to getting consumer3 attention. However, Godin strongly suggest the idea that marketing can no longer proceed with this model. Advertisers do not have the power anymore to interrupt enough consumers to gain profit. Besides, people are now demanding more personalisation, and they are most likely to respond to advertising that is frequent, focused and personal; hence, the need of permission marketing is justified. In other words, interruption marketing has been failing for a long time, because traditional advertising is not working well anymore; it is not easily measured, predictable and it is expensive. Moreover, traditional advertising presents various problems for the marketers. An enormous amount of advertising creates clutter, which leads to not getting enough attention from consumers. As previously mentioned, consumers’ most valued commodity is time, therefore they are now willingly trying to save it as much as possible. In addition, thanks to mass production, the quality of products has increased dramatically, which resulted in a serious lack of care and loyalty of consumers. GODIN, Seth, “Permission Marketing”, London: 2007, p. xxvii1 GODIN, Seth, “Permission Marketing”, London: 2007, p. 12 GODIN, Seth, “Permission Marketing”, London: 2007, p. 33 !2
  3. 3. According to Permission Marketing, most marketers are trying to keep mass media alive by finding odder places to advertise, making ads more controversial or entertaining, and keeping them interesting and fresh. On the contrary, through permission marketing, powerful advertising derives from anticipation, personalisation and relevance. Permission marketing cuts through the clutter and allows a marketer to speak to prospects as friends, not strangers. That is why many marketers are abandoning advertising and replacing it with direct mail and promotions, thus implementing permission marketing campaigns. If permission marketing is so effective as the book portrays it to be, one cannot help but wonder, why keep using interruption marketing? As a matter of fact there are several reasons why interruption marketing still stays as a valid strategy for many businesses. First of all, the main reason is habit. The allure and ease of a TV campaign clouds companies’ visions, even though the same money spent in a permission focused campaign would yield better results. Secondly, the book implies that for many products who rely on branding, a permission marketing strategy may be overkill. It is further stated that companies with products that are low-cost should continue to focus on interruption marketing to build their brand. To give a more concrete example, TV advertising will work for lifestyle brands like beer or beverages with less of a story. Lastly, interruption marketing is still needed to manage a successful permission marketing campaign. In Permission Marketing, Godin states that the first step of permission marketing is to interrupt the consumer. So, that is one reason why there will always be a place for interruption marketing: to get that initial attention. Otherwise, the permission process never starts. Thus, the cost of interruption cannot be avoided by the marketer. In addition, before a marketer can build trust, s/he must breed familiarity. And familiarity cannot be done without awareness. In order to create awareness, the marketer needs advertising. There are two key factors that define the success of advertising: reach (exposure) and frequency. Frequency of a campaign creates awareness and builds trust, which results in profits for a company. In point of fact, permission marketing is the tool that makes frequency work. Throughout the book, Seth Godin further elaborates on the nature of permission. He starts by acknowledging that all permission is not created equal, and there exists various degrees. He stresses that the ultimate goal of the marketer should be to increase the amount of permission from consumers over a course of time. In other words, turn strangers to friends, then to customers and finally to loyal customers. He also implies that permission is non-transferable (that makes it unique for each consumer), is a process (not momental) and can be canceled at any time by the consumer. So in order to run an efficient and successful permission marketing strategy, the author suggests some key steps to the readers. To begin with, it is necessary for the organisations to figure out the lifetime value of a new customer. Second of all, it is indispensable to invent and !3
  4. 4. build a series of communication channels. While building a communication strategy, one must take into account that; the messages should take place over a course of time, they must offer the consumer a selfish reason to respond and they should be adapted according to the consumer. Thirdly, marketers should change all of their ads to a “call to action”, meaning, giving consumers a chance to respond.  In addition, measurement of the results of each channel is essential such as; the number and the level of permission, as well as how much more is needed to change buying behaviour. Finally, organisations can leverage acquired permission by offering additional products or services through co-marketing with partners. As previously mentioned, the heart of permission marketing is to give the stranger, the potential customer, a reason to pay attention, and start a dialogue. However, this first step (interruption) is expensive, tricky and slow. This is why most marketers prefer to directly go to the next step, by purchasing or renting e-mail lists. However, without initial contact most messages will be viewed as spam by the consumers, thus it will demolish trust, and eventually wreck business. Godin keeps giving concrete examples throughout the book, by portraying how companies lost their consumer database for the sakes of short-term profits by selling or renting customer information to third parties. So why should companies refrain from selling the names and data they have collected to third parties? The author compiles two reasons. First of all, it will enormously increase the clutter which the customer will be exposed to. Therefore, the private relationship with the customer which the company has worked so hard to create will be sabotaged. Secondly, it will violate the trust of the customer towards the company, often resulting with a removal of permission, thus resulting in a critical diminish of the customer database. On another note, the author states that the Internet is the greatest direct marketing medium ever invented. With this declaration, he pays special attention to websites and their relevance to permission marketing. According to the book, every commercial website should be set up with one goal. It should be focused completely on signing up strangers to give companies permission to market to them. In other words, websites should be a permission and acquisition medium, and businesses should be “obsessed” with getting maximum amount of permission. Towards the end of Permission Marketing, Godin explains the biggest stumbling blocks companies face in terms of adopting a permission marketing strategy. There exists three main reasons: organisational problems, companies’ greed and lack of foresight. To dig a bit deeper, the author for example, suggests that the challenge of big companies is not financial. In fact, it is the coordination of the organisation. That is one of the reasons why small companies are more agile and quicker to adapt to new trends and applying permission marketing techniques correctly. Secondly, greed is a risky obstacle. Once the investment for permission is made, there is generally a huge pressure to harvest the results right away. However, the sooner !4
  5. 5. companies begin to leverage the investment, the harder it will grow. Giving is far more important than taking, especially at the beginning of this process and patience is critical for the long term. And last but not least, the lack of foresight, in other words the companies’ lack of discipline to plan ahead presents a major obstacle to efficiently implement this strategy. Godin concludes by comparing an interruption marketer to a hunter, and a permission marketer to a farmer. While the former implements aggressive strategies to capture the consumer’s attention, the latter thrives on building a mutual relationship, by consistent follow-up messages over time. Evidently, it requires a huge investment of energy to transform a consumer from stranger to friend and then friend to customer. It is an undeniable fact that, in every market with every audience, permission is a very powerful asset and it carries a huge potential for leverage. Organisations who want to adapt, stay relevant and ahead of competition in this era of technology, should consider permission marketing as their highest priority. !5

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