Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Upcoming SlideShare
What to Upload to SlideShare
Next
Download to read offline and view in fullscreen.

Share

Git Introduction

Download to read offline

An introduction to git, a distributed version control system for tracking changes in source code.

Related Books

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all
  • Be the first to like this

Git Introduction

  1. 1. Presenter: Hita Barasm Mamagani In The Name of God
  2. 2. What is Git? Git is a version control system for tracking changes in computer files and coordinating work on those files among multiple people. It is primarily used for source code management in software development, but it can be used to keep track of changes in any set of files. As a distributed revision control system it is aimed at speed, data integrity, and support for distributed, non-linear workflows.
  3. 3. Version Control System CentralizedDistributed
  4. 4. Centralized Distributed Centralized vs Distributed
  5. 5. Why Git? • Working offline • Fast to Work With • Repositories Are Smaller • Moving or Adding files • Ignore Certain Files • Branches • Check the Status of Your Changes • Stash Branches • Find version that introduced a bug using Binary Search • …
  6. 6. Disadvantages of Git • Steep learning curve Many commands with many options, some commands are non-intuitive and need a level of understanding the internals of git. • Slow on binary files If your project has non-text files that are updated frequently, then git becomes bloated and slow.
  7. 7. Git Online Storage Providers • GitHub • GitLab • GitKraken • …
  8. 8. How Git works?
  9. 9. Git Commands • init //create a local git repository • commit //records a snapshot of staging area into repo • pull //fetch from a remote repo and try to merge into the current branch • push //push your new branches and data to a remote repository • checkout //Switch branches or restore working tree files • status //view the status of your files in the working directory and staging area • diff //shows diff of what is staged and what is modified but unstaged
  10. 10. Creating New Repository
  11. 11. Example on GitLab
  12. 12. Working on Existing Repo
  13. 13. Fetched Repo Example
  14. 14. Fork A Repository • A fork is a copy of a repository. Forking a repository allows you to freely experiment with changes without affecting the original project. • Most commonly, forks are used to either propose changes to someone else's project or to use someone else's project as a starting point for your own idea.
  15. 15. Project Management Tools provided for project management by GitHub:

An introduction to git, a distributed version control system for tracking changes in source code.

Views

Total views

24

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

0

Actions

Downloads

0

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

0

×