Online Journal Exchanges  with  Writeboard   TESOL 2011 New Orleans                Harry Harris   Hakuoh University, Japan
Outline <ul><li>Background </li></ul><ul><li>Why journals? </li></ul><ul><li>Why online? </li></ul><ul><li>Importance of u...
Background <ul><li>New English Program at regional Japanese university </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Series of four elective writi...
Why Journals? <ul><ul><li>Develop a sense of audience (e.g., Blair, 2003) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learn  from  each oth...
Why Online? <ul><li>Issue of lost, damaged, or undelivered “traditional” paper journals </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative po...
Importance of Synchronous/Asynchronous Online Learning <ul><li>Use more authentic language (Davey, 2005) </li></ul><ul><li...
http://www.writeboard.com/
Create a Writeboard
E-Mail Message <ul><li>A new writeboard has been created for you: </li></ul><ul><li>TESOL 2011 </li></ul><ul><li>http://12...
Save Writeboard
Invite People
Invite People
Free Topics for Journal Entries
Basic vs. Advanced Writeboard Journal Entries <ul><li>Organization </li></ul><ul><li>Quantity </li></ul>
Collaborative Essays
Debate Arguments
Proofreading
Managing Writeboards
Issues <ul><li>Getting online </li></ul><ul><li>Non-participation </li></ul><ul><li>Often address the teacher, not peers <...
Conclusion <ul><li>Writeboard is  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Easy to set up </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Easy to use </li></ul></...
References 1 <ul><li>Abdullah, M. H. (2003). The impact of electronic communication on writing . Bloomington, IN: ERIC Cle...
References 2 <ul><li>Felix, U. (2005). Analyzing recent CALL effectiveness research: Towards a common agenda.  CALL Journa...
References 3 <ul><li>Spack, R. & Sadow, C. (1983). Student-teacher working journals in ESL freshman composition.  TESOL Qu...
References 4 <ul><li>Trupe, A. L. (2002). Academic literacy in a wired world: Redefining genres for college writing course...
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Online Journal Exchanges with Writeboard

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Writeboard is a user-friendly online resource that can be used for student journal entry exchanges and other activities.

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  • Good afternoon, everybody. I hope you have been enjoying TESOL 2011. I certainly have.. I’m Harry Harris from Hakuoh University in Japan. Thank you for attending this Workshop on Writeboard, an electronic forum that my students use for journal entries and other collaborative activities. I have opted to make this a workshop today so that we can share ideas which we can take back and adapt to meet the needs and demands of our own circumstances. I certainly hope to grow from this in order to help my students with new ways to participate in online writing activities.
  • BACKGROUND: To give an idea of my students’ needs. JOURNALS: To provide extra, non-essay type writing practice. ONLINE: Explain why instead of traditional paper journals. SYNCHRONOUS/ASYNCHRONOUS: To provide a probably unnecessary explanation for why CALL is important. YOUR SUGGESTIONS: Ask for you to share your ideas. Then, we will look at Writeboard, which you will see is a wiki with and Add Comments secition. We will conclude with a second break providing everybody with the opportunity to share ideas about how to use a wiki in the classroom. Then we will look at some issues and conclude.
  • Regional university in Japan; New English program with students who mainly want to become English teachers. The program is fairly rigorous with 6 compositions per 14-week course, journal entry requirements, and other grammar, punctuation, etc., activities. They are fairly motivated. Important to understand is that many English majors in Japan have done very little writing in English or even Japanese, so the journals are an important activity that allows them to do quantity writing. However, they are at least in the beginning challenged by computer technology, which, as we shall see, is the major reason why I use Writeboard.
  • The literature supports journal use in writing. It helps students develop a sense of audience, rather than just their teacher; it helps them learn from and about each other, helping them learn and helping to create group cohesion; and, relatedly, it provides them with a means to practice communicating for a purpose other than academic. It also helps with language skills.
  • Issues with paper journals; could not intervene as much with paper journals; and of course free and easy to use
  • Felix did a fairly exhaustive study 2002-2004 of literature; Vygotsky, of course, we know because of his theory of Zone of Proximal Growth, the learning gap that is bridged by adult guidance and peer collaboration; and Dewey, who provides us with a social model of learning
  • What I have used is something I found online called Writeboard, which as I have said is essentially a wiki below which you can write comments.
  • Something like the following will be delivered to your electronic mailbox.
  • Now, you do what you want with your Writeboard and save it.
  • Then, if you want to use it for collaborative purposes, as I certainly do, you insert the e-mail addresses of those whom you wish to share the board.
  • So what can you do with the writeboard to support your students who are making journal entries?
  • http://123.writeboard.com/64c636f0d2fda0155/login password 1 http://123.writeboard.com/9f9e1b6b282391da2 2
  • You may want to do this when you have large classes, as I did one semester with 38 students.
  • If you do debate, as I do, you can use the wiki to provide students with an out-of-class opportunity to work on debate. In some classes at my university, and elsewhere, I have students prepare for debates.
  • They can also do proofreading exercises, whether simple sentences or within the context of texts.
  • Now, how do I manage my Writeboards? This screenshot is not complete, but as you can see, your writeboards can add up. I first save the URLs on a Word document until my desktop got too full and I had trouble finding the document. I then moved them into a folder section of my hotmail account.
  • In first semester, took 2 weeks for some to get online. Some students do not participate as much as the syllabus demands; I let them know the requirements at the beginning of the semester in written and oral form and count their entries at the end of the semester. Also, my students seem to still address me in their entries, though the eventually seem to address their Writeboard mates more as they get to know each other. Also, with the wiki, there seem to be some cultural issues, at least with my students, who hesitate to correct each other. Then, as suggested earlier, my basic students at time approached me and told me that they did have anything to write about, so I provide topics.
  • In conclusion, Writeboard is….
  • Online Journal Exchanges with Writeboard

    1. 1. Online Journal Exchanges with Writeboard TESOL 2011 New Orleans              Harry Harris Hakuoh University, Japan
    2. 2. Outline <ul><li>Background </li></ul><ul><li>Why journals? </li></ul><ul><li>Why online? </li></ul><ul><li>Importance of use computer technology </li></ul><ul><li>Access of Writeboard and journal usage </li></ul><ul><li>Basic and Advanced Writeboard examples </li></ul><ul><li>Other uses </li></ul><ul><li>Writeboard management </li></ul><ul><li>Issues </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion </li></ul><ul><li>References </li></ul>
    3. 3. Background <ul><li>New English Program at regional Japanese university </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Series of four elective writing courses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Class time for peer work, student-teacher conferences, and other activities such as grammar mini-sessions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Six compositions per course </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dialog journal entries: 150/350 words per week </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Why Journals? <ul><ul><li>Develop a sense of audience (e.g., Blair, 2003) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learn from each other (e.g., Paulus, 1999) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learn about each other (e.g., Stewart, 1996) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Engage in authentic writing situation (e.g., Spack & Sadow, 1983) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Improve language skills (e.g., St. John & Cash, 1995) </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. Why Online? <ul><li>Issue of lost, damaged, or undelivered “traditional” paper journals </li></ul><ul><li>Collaborative possibilities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Student-teacher </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Student-student </li></ul></ul>
    6. 6. Importance of Synchronous/Asynchronous Online Learning <ul><li>Use more authentic language (Davey, 2005) </li></ul><ul><li>Produce “[p]ositive effects on vocabulary development, reading and writing” (Felix, 2005, p. 12) </li></ul><ul><li>Provide less intimidating online environment where more likely to articulate ideas (Abdullah, 2003) </li></ul><ul><li>Help develop awareness of audience (Trupe, 2002) </li></ul><ul><li>Provide constant access to what have written (Sengupta, 2001) </li></ul><ul><li>Write more (Pennington, 1993) </li></ul><ul><li>Learn collaboratively with peers and others (Vygotsky, 1978) </li></ul><ul><li>Learn by participating in shared activity (Dewey, 1916) </li></ul>
    7. 7. http://www.writeboard.com/
    8. 8. Create a Writeboard
    9. 9. E-Mail Message <ul><li>A new writeboard has been created for you: </li></ul><ul><li>TESOL 2011 </li></ul><ul><li>http://123.writeboard.com/e9dlsqmvh8245agx/login </li></ul><ul><li>Password: NOLA </li></ul>
    10. 10. Save Writeboard
    11. 11. Invite People
    12. 12. Invite People
    13. 13. Free Topics for Journal Entries
    14. 14. Basic vs. Advanced Writeboard Journal Entries <ul><li>Organization </li></ul><ul><li>Quantity </li></ul>
    15. 15. Collaborative Essays
    16. 16. Debate Arguments
    17. 17. Proofreading
    18. 18. Managing Writeboards
    19. 19. Issues <ul><li>Getting online </li></ul><ul><li>Non-participation </li></ul><ul><li>Often address the teacher, not peers </li></ul><ul><li>Topics </li></ul><ul><li>Plagiarism and recycled work </li></ul>
    20. 20. Conclusion <ul><li>Writeboard is </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Easy to set up </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Easy to use </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Adaptable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Open to variety of uses </li></ul></ul>
    21. 21. References 1 <ul><li>Abdullah, M. H. (2003). The impact of electronic communication on writing . Bloomington, IN: ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading English and Communication. (ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 477 614). </li></ul><ul><li>Blair, L. (2003) Teaching composition online: No longer the second-best choice. Kairos 2 (2). Retrieved July 16, 2007, from http:// </li></ul><ul><li>english.ttu.edu/kairos/8.2/index.html </li></ul><ul><li>Davey, I. (2005). The use of the Internet in Call: Opportunities and limitations. Ritsumeikan Studies in Language and Culture, 17 (1), 207-216. </li></ul><ul><li>Dewey, J. (1916). Democracy and Education. The Macmillan Company. HTML markup copyright 1994 ILT Digital Classics. Retrieved Aug. 7, 2007, from http://www.ilt.columbia.edu/ publications/Projects/digitexts/dewey/d_e/chapter02.html </li></ul>
    22. 22. References 2 <ul><li>Felix, U. (2005). Analyzing recent CALL effectiveness research: Towards a common agenda. CALL Journal , 18 (1 & 2), 1-33. Retrieved June 3, 2007, from http://www.arts.monash.edu.au/ </li></ul><ul><li>lcl/newmedia-in-langlearn/phd-calljourna105-final.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>Paulus, T. M. (1999). The effect of peer and teacher feedback on student writing. Journal of Second Language Writing, 8 (3), 265-289. </li></ul><ul><li>Pennington, M. C. (1993). A critical examination of word processing effects in relation to L2 writers. Journal of Second Language Writing, 2 (3), 227-255. </li></ul><ul><li>Sengupta, S. (2001). Exchanging ideas with peers in network-based classrooms: An aid or a pain? Language Learning & Technology , 5 (1), 103-134. </li></ul>
    23. 23. References 3 <ul><li>Spack, R. & Sadow, C. (1983). Student-teacher working journals in ESL freshman composition. TESOL Quarterly, 17 (4), 575-593. </li></ul><ul><li>St. John, E., & Cash, D. (1995). Language learning via e-mail: Demonstrable success with German. In M. Warschauer (Ed.), Virtual connections: Online activities and projects for networking language learners (pp. 191-197). Honolulu, HI: University of Hawaii, Second Language and Teaching Curriculum Center. </li></ul><ul><li>Stewart, T. (1996). Secret partner journals for motivation, fluency and fun. The Internet TESL Journal, II (7). Retrieved Aug. 1, 2007, from </li></ul><ul><li>http://iteslj.org/Techniques/Stewart-SecretJournals.html </li></ul>
    24. 24. References 4 <ul><li>Trupe, A. L. (2002). Academic literacy in a wired world: Redefining genres for college writing courses. Kairos, 7 (2). Retrieved July 16, 2007, from http://english.ttu.edu/kairos/7.2/binder.html?sectionone/ </li></ul><ul><li>Vygotsky, L. (1978). Mind in society: The development of higher psychological processes . Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press. </li></ul><ul><li>Writeboard. From 37signals Basecamp Web site http://www.writeboard.com . </li></ul>

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