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Reverse Chaos Method of Requirements Prioritisation

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Practical method of requirements prioritisation based on the Statistics of Product Success from Chaos Manifesto from Standish Group.

+ As bonus some thoughts and clarification of the definition of Minimum Viable Product and Minimum Viable Feature.

Presentation for UX Camp Amsterdam 2015, 9 September 2015.

Published in: Design

Reverse Chaos Method of Requirements Prioritisation

  1. 1. Reverse Chaos Method of Requirements Prioritisation Gena Drahun
  2. 2. Gena Drahun [ˈɡə-na dra-ˈgün]
  3. 3. More than 100 design projects…
  4. 4. Experience with small projects…
  5. 5. Experience with large projects… •  Failed: 75% (3 of 4) •  Great success: 25% (1 of 4)
  6. 6. Chaos Manifesto Standish Group
  7. 7. Chaos  Report,  Standish  Group  
  8. 8. Study of Project Success
  9. 9. Successful   76%   Challenged   20%   Failed   4%   Success Rates of Small* projects * Less than $1 million in labor content
  10. 10. Challenged   52%  Failed   38%   Successful   10%   Success Rates of Large* projects * More than $10 million in labor content
  11. 11. Large Projects vs. Small Projects •  10x times more decisions to made •  7,5x lower success rate
  12. 12. Can we make less decisions and provide the same customer value?
  13. 13. Study of Features Used
  14. 14. Hardly  or   never   50%   SomeFmes  or   occasionally   30%   OHen   20%   Usage of Implemented Features
  15. 15. Not   implemented   33%   Hardly  or   never  used   33%   Used   someFmes  or   infrequently   20%   Used  oHen   14%   Planned Features
  16. 16. Even if you have half your users asking for a feature it doesn’t necessarily mean they will actually use the feature. What people say they will do is often radically different from what they actually do. hLp://www.mindtheproduct.com/2013/05/the-­‐minimally-­‐viable-­‐feature-­‐approach/  
  17. 17. … there’s a much bigger problem… : people are often incapable of articulating why they do things or how they would behave in the future. hLp://www.forbes.com/sites/rogerdooley/2012/10/04/market-­‐research/  
  18. 18. Reverse Chaos
  19. 19. Scope of a Sample Product: •  90 Features •  ~ 900 User Stories
  20. 20. Let’s apply the statistics from Chaos Report
  21. 21. 14% Features will be used often (1 feature of 7 planned)
  22. 22. Select <N1> features that you will be using (expect to be used) often
  23. 23. Closed Card Sorting: •  Individual/ Group Sorting •  with Product Team/ Users/ Business
  24. 24. MFP? Minimum Functional Product
  25. 25. Perfection is achieved, not when there is nothing more to add, but when there is nothing left to take away.   Antoine de Saint-Exupéry  
  26. 26. 20% features will be used sometimes (1 feature of 5 planned)
  27. 27. From the features left, select <N2> features that you will be using (expect to be used) sometimes
  28. 28. Second round of Card Sorting
  29. 29. “Optimal” Product scope?
  30. 30. hLp://www.jeffgothelf.com/blog/agile-­‐doesnt-­‐have-­‐a-­‐brain/#sthash.riyIEay3.dpbs   Agile doesn’t have a brain. Bill Scott … no mechanism for determining if they’re building the right feature. Jeff Gothelf
  31. 31. THINK   WORK  SMARTER   NOT  HARDER    
  32. 32. Almost the END
  33. 33. MVP
  34. 34. Who of you know what is MVP?
  35. 35. Are you sure?
  36. 36. We define MVP as… unique product that maximizes return on risk for both the vendor and the customer..   Frank Robinson Coined the term “Minimum Viable Product” in 2001 http://www.syncdev.com/minimum-viable-product/
  37. 37. .   Frank Robinson, Coined the term “Minimum Viable Product” in 2001 http://www.syncdev.com/minimum- viable-product/ * Hurdle rate is the minimum acceptable rate of return. Most companies use 12% hurdle rate. *   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ Minimum_acceptable_rate_of_return
  38. 38. .   Ash Maurya Author of “Running Lean” and creator of “Lean Canvas” http://leanstack.com/minimum-viable-product// Minimum Viable Product is the smallest thing you can build that delivers customer value (and as a bonus captures some of that value back).
  39. 39. hLp://www.mindtheproduct.com/2014/10/lean-­‐product-­‐management-­‐the-­‐ mvp-­‐culture-­‐within-­‐every-­‐featureenhacement-­‐development/  
  40. 40. ED   1   2   3   Gena  Drahun,  September  2015  |  With  compliments  to  Jussi  Pasanen  and  Aaron  Walter   Build the product small but complete, not by a part, by a slice or by a layer.
  41. 41. One step further?
  42. 42. MVF Minimum Viable Feature hLp://www.mindtheproduct.com/2013/05/the-­‐minimally-­‐viable-­‐feature-­‐approach/  
  43. 43. You can set the level of “perfection” per individual feature
  44. 44. Choose the quality of your product ingredients
  45. 45. *  Stephen  Anderson’s  Experiences  Pyramid   Meaningful   Pleasurable   Usable   FuncFonal  
  46. 46. Gena Drahun @HDrahun hienadzdrahun http://www.slideshare.net/Hienadz.Drahun Add More Brains!

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