• The Lost Dances of Egon Schiele (2002), a video-dance,
was created by the contemporary British choreographer
Lea Anderso...
• Anderson appropriates Schiele’s painterly images and
makes them her own.
• Her mode of re-working the genre generates ne...
• Was regarded by art historians as a
major exponent of Viennese
Expressionism (Kallir, 1981, Comini,
1978).
• He produced...
Krumau Town Crescent I, 1915/16.
Two Little Girls, 1911.
Embrace, 1915.
Seated Male Nude, 1910.
Black-Haired Nude Girl, Standing, 1910.
Lovers (Two Girls), 1911.
Reclining Woman, 1917.
A Point of Departure
• Between British postmodernism of late 20th century and
Viennese Expressionism of early 20th century...
For My Art and for My
Loved Ones, 1912.
Chris Nash, detail from the
dance.
Chris Nash, detail from the
dance.
Self-Portrait in Lavender
Shirt, 1914.
Chris Nash, detail fro the
dance.
Fighter, 1913.
Speaking of her attempt to reproduce Schiele’s Sketch
Books, Anderson says:
“…I suddenly thought, I wonder what it would
b...
Representation
• Make present again – by means of one kind of
simulacrum.
• Stands for something or someone absent – rests...
Drawing a Nude Model before a Mirror, 1910.
The Chain of Gazes
• The association between representation and power is
embedded in referential representation: the power...
Complexity of Representation
• Anderson: “every single position comes from a
painting or sketch of his.”
in Hutera, 1998.
...
Representation – An Active Force
• The dance not only focuses audiences attention on
Schiele’s art, but to Anderson as an ...
Conclusions
• The play emphasizes the distance between the
artists and challenges the impossibility of
representation in m...
References
Barthes, Roland. “Diderot, Brecht, Eisenstein” in Revue d’Esthétique, Vol. 26,
1973, pp. 185-191.
Briginshaw, V...
References
Hargreaves, Martin. “Profile Lea Anderson”. Dance Theatre Journal, 18:3,
2002, pp. 16-19.
Hutcheon, Linda. Mode...
Videography
Anderson, Lea and McKeirnan, Kevin. The Lost Dances of Egon Schiele, BBC
and the Arts Council of England, 2002.
Drawing out the Connections between the Past and the Present
Drawing out the Connections between the Past and the Present
Drawing out the Connections between the Past and the Present
Drawing out the Connections between the Past and the Present
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Drawing out the Connections between the Past and the Present

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The Lost Dances of Egon Schiele (2002) by Lea Anderson

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Drawing out the Connections between the Past and the Present

  1. 1. • The Lost Dances of Egon Schiele (2002), a video-dance, was created by the contemporary British choreographer Lea Anderson and Kevin McKiernan. • Performed by The Featherstonehaughs (pronounced Fanshaws: Frank Bock, Stephen Kirkham, Rem Lee, Eddie Nixon, Dan O’Neill, Luca Silvestrini. • Music: Steve Blake; Lighting: Simon Corder; Costumes: Sandy Powell, Photographer: Chris Nash.
  2. 2. • Anderson appropriates Schiele’s painterly images and makes them her own. • Her mode of re-working the genre generates new manifestations in postmodern culture. • Anderson combines the conventions he used with her own discipline. • She represents Schiele’s models while re-constructing an artistic structure within which they could be performed.
  3. 3. • Was regarded by art historians as a major exponent of Viennese Expressionism (Kallir, 1981, Comini, 1978). • He produced an oeuvre of painting and drawings ranging from landscapes to provocative nudes. Egon Schiele (1890-1918(
  4. 4. Krumau Town Crescent I, 1915/16.
  5. 5. Two Little Girls, 1911.
  6. 6. Embrace, 1915.
  7. 7. Seated Male Nude, 1910.
  8. 8. Black-Haired Nude Girl, Standing, 1910.
  9. 9. Lovers (Two Girls), 1911.
  10. 10. Reclining Woman, 1917.
  11. 11. A Point of Departure • Between British postmodernism of late 20th century and Viennese Expressionism of early 20th century. • The work challenges modernist art while, at the same time, creating a link with the past by addressing and recalling it visually. • From a historical point of view, does the return to a model of art from the past supports the development of a new practice or challenge it?
  12. 12. For My Art and for My Loved Ones, 1912. Chris Nash, detail from the dance.
  13. 13. Chris Nash, detail from the dance. Self-Portrait in Lavender Shirt, 1914.
  14. 14. Chris Nash, detail fro the dance. Fighter, 1913.
  15. 15. Speaking of her attempt to reproduce Schiele’s Sketch Books, Anderson says: “…I suddenly thought, I wonder what it would be like if I just reconstruct the ‘Lost Dances’ of Egon Schiele?” (in Robertson, 1998, p. 19.)
  16. 16. Representation • Make present again – by means of one kind of simulacrum. • Stands for something or someone absent – rests on a principle of substitution. In theory it covers the entire field of culture. (Prendergast, 2000)
  17. 17. Drawing a Nude Model before a Mirror, 1910.
  18. 18. The Chain of Gazes • The association between representation and power is embedded in referential representation: the powerful female spectator’s look avoid what Maulvey refers to as ‘masculinisation’ of spectatorship (in Doan, 1982). • The shift from the object to the subject of representation - the way Anderson transforms Schiele’s Expressionist art.
  19. 19. Complexity of Representation • Anderson: “every single position comes from a painting or sketch of his.” in Hutera, 1998. • The traces of the past are represented as a duality between 2 layers of time. • Field of power – every point of view is a relative one. • The dance works with two distinctive sets of images and the space between them.
  20. 20. Representation – An Active Force • The dance not only focuses audiences attention on Schiele’s art, but to Anderson as an author. • Anderson operates representations through manipulations of theoretical discourses borrowed from visual art (way of looking, artist and model, naked and nude).
  21. 21. Conclusions • The play emphasizes the distance between the artists and challenges the impossibility of representation in modernist culture (Connor, 1997). • The application of imitation and pastiche is a critical device that deconstructs the conventional meaning of Schiele’s art. • The web-like structure demonstrates a new practice in which the arts to penetrate and enrich each other.
  22. 22. References Barthes, Roland. “Diderot, Brecht, Eisenstein” in Revue d’Esthétique, Vol. 26, 1973, pp. 185-191. Briginshaw, Valerie. Lea Anderson Talks to Valerie Briginshaw about Flesh and Blood. Dance Matters 13, Summer 1995, pp. 4-8. Burt, Ramsay. Re-Presentations of Re-Presentations. Dance Theatre Journal 14:2, 1998, pp. 30-33. Comini, Alessandra. The Fantastic Art of Vienna. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1978. Connor, Steven. Postmodernist Culture: An Introduction to Theories of the Contemporary. Oxford: Blackwell, 1997. Doane, Mary Ann. “Film and the Masquerade: Theorising the Female Spectator”. Screen 23:3-4, Sept-Oct 1982, pp. 74-88. Dodds, Sherril. “‘Perfect Moments, Immaculately Framed’: Lea Anderson and the Television Text”. Border Tension: Dance & Discourse. Proceedings of the Fifth Study of Dance Conference, Guildford, University of Surrey, 1995.
  23. 23. References Hargreaves, Martin. “Profile Lea Anderson”. Dance Theatre Journal, 18:3, 2002, pp. 16-19. Hutcheon, Linda. Modelling the Postmodern: Parody and Politics. A Poetics of Postmodernism: History, Theory, Fiction. London: Routledge, 1989, pp. 22-36. Hutera, Donald. “The Boys get into a Viennese Whirl”. The Times, 10 February 1998, p. 34. Jordan, Stephanie. The Cholmondeleys, Spring '88. Dance Theatre Journal 6:2, Fall 1988, p. 27. Kallir, Jane. Austria’s Expressionism. New York: Rizzoli, Galerie St. Etienne, 1981. Prendergast, Christopher. The Triangle of Representation. New York: Columbia University Press, 2000. Robertson, Allen. “G’day Schiele!” Time Out, 31 December – 7 January 1998, p. 19.
  24. 24. Videography Anderson, Lea and McKeirnan, Kevin. The Lost Dances of Egon Schiele, BBC and the Arts Council of England, 2002.

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