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REFLECTION
SEVEN
Classroom and Behaviour
Management
INITIAL THOUGHTS
 Classroom behaviour management requires a careful and
considered approach as students react in a more p...
MANAGEMENT METHODS
 When dealing with behaviour issues, teachers need to use
management methods that have a solution-orie...
THE RULES!
 Teachers need to establish rules early so the students know what
the boundaries are. Tell students what your ...
POSITIVE TECHNIQUES
 Positive reinforcement is a great strategy for classroom
management as half of the teacher’s time is...
A COLLABORATIVE EFFORT
 Identifying and implementing strategies to address problematic
behaviour will result in a more op...
PROBLEM STUDENTS
 No matter how much teachers do their best to make the
classroom a comfortable and safe place for their ...
CLASSROOM SET UP
 Teachers need to make sure that the classroom is set up in a way
that is conducive to a positive climat...
STUDENT REACTIONS
 It is important to have an agreed upon set of rules in the
classroom and have a realistic set of belie...
ENABLE, ENGAGE, EXCEL
 In conclusion, students are better enabled to be engaged in their
learning and to excel if the cla...
REFERENCES
 Brophy, J. (1983). Effective classroom management. The School
Administrator, 40(7), 33-36
 University of Del...
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Reflection seven

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Reflection seven

  1. 1. REFLECTION SEVEN Classroom and Behaviour Management
  2. 2. INITIAL THOUGHTS  Classroom behaviour management requires a careful and considered approach as students react in a more positive and productive way and are able to learn better when they are treated like human beings and not treated as if they are being looked down upon all of the time.
  3. 3. MANAGEMENT METHODS  When dealing with behaviour issues, teachers need to use management methods that have a solution-orientated effect (Brophy J, 1983) so that together the student and the teacher can highlight the issue and move forward in a constructive manner. This then helps to build a mutual respect between the students and the teacher. Teachers need to check to see if there is an underlying issue that is causing the behaviour problems (Brophy J, 1983) in class and then see if there is anything they can do to improve the learning environment for the student.
  4. 4. THE RULES!  Teachers need to establish rules early so the students know what the boundaries are. Tell students what your expectations are the first day of class. Most students feel anxious when they are not certain what behaviours teachers expect from them. When teachers clearly and consistently communicate their expectations for student behaviour they help to ease student anxiety (dte.udel.edu). There needs to be a series of strategies put in place for the teacher to use as behaviour of the students either improves or gets worse such as eye contact, shifting seats, referral, isolation, being sent to the principal’s office etc.
  5. 5. POSITIVE TECHNIQUES  Positive reinforcement is a great strategy for classroom management as half of the teacher’s time is nearly always tied up in having to deal with the students who distract others and are defiant. By using positive reinforcement you can then acknowledge the students who are doing well by exemplifying their good behaviour and standards. The use of non-verbal management techniques are good, such as clapping a rhythm, as it saves the teachers energy and becomes an automatic behaviour response from the students. They know when they have non-verbal management what they are expected to do.
  6. 6. A COLLABORATIVE EFFORT  Identifying and implementing strategies to address problematic behaviour will result in a more optimal learning environment for both students and teachers (Aune B, 2011). If the students and teachers participate together in decisions about the sort of learning climate they all want (McGee & Fraser, 2012) then students feel like they have ownership of their learning environment and also that their opinions matters. It is a good idea to have visuals on the wall of what is expected of the students in the class also so the students know what the teacher (and students themselves as they helped to create the list) expects of them.
  7. 7. PROBLEM STUDENTS  No matter how much teachers do their best to make the classroom a comfortable and safe place for their students, there will always be students who push the boundaries and do inappropriate things in class. The teacher has to be calm within themselves and deal with the situation in a matter of fact way, otherwise it becomes some kind of game for the students and they see how quickly they can wind up the teacher before they yell at the class. Teachers should seek to use their own leadership and support behaviour in a calm and positive way (wherever possible) to defuse, direct, de-escalate potential conflict and hostility (Rogers B, 2011) The best way in dealing with students who misbehave is to try and deal with the individual student and try not to punish the whole class when it is not warranted.
  8. 8. CLASSROOM SET UP  Teachers need to make sure that the classroom is set up in a way that is conducive to a positive climate. Asking students to come to the front of the room so that they are close to each other encourages more participation than an arrangement with students scattered around the classroom. For a small discussion section, it may be useful to arrange chairs in a circle or a U shape. (dte.udel.edu). Teachers also need to regularly scan the classroom to be aware of what the students are doing as this helps with intervention before a negative situation can occur, such as bullying or verbal abuse. Rules need to be operated in a way that avoids an over-zealous approach (McGee & Fraser, 2012) as the students will respect you more as a teacher. You also need to follow up on consequences as students will not respect you if you can’t set firm but friendly directions for student behaviour (McGee & Fraser, 2012).
  9. 9. STUDENT REACTIONS  It is important to have an agreed upon set of rules in the classroom and have a realistic set of beliefs and strategies for dealing with behaviour issues and behaviour management. Most students react in a constructive way if you can treat them with respect and acknowledge their thoughts and feelings. If the students feel like the teacher is listening to them and taking on board what they are saying then the teacher can reason with the student and a positive outcome can be reached. If the student know what the rules and expectations are and played a part in the development of those rules then they will have a better awareness of when they are overstepping the mark. When teachers try to dictate to the students through a “thou shalt not..!” manner then it is inevitable that the students will react badly to this.
  10. 10. ENABLE, ENGAGE, EXCEL  In conclusion, students are better enabled to be engaged in their learning and to excel if the classroom behaviour is managed in a consistent way through collaborative rule-making which is owned by all. A positive modern learning environment provides students with an excellent opportunity to reach their potential in learning.
  11. 11. REFERENCES  Brophy, J. (1983). Effective classroom management. The School Administrator, 40(7), 33-36  University of Delaware, Positive Classroom Climate, http://cte.udel.edu/publications/handbook-graduate- assistants/getting-started/positive-classroom-climate.html  McGee C, Fraser D, (2012) The professional practice of teaching (4th edition), Cengage Learning, Pgs 119, 133  Aune B, Burt B, Gennaro P, (2011)Behaviour Solutions in and beyond the inclusive classroom, Future Horizons Inc. Inside the classroom, P 1  Rogers B (2011), Classroom Behaviour: A practical guide to effective teaching, behaviour management and colleague support (3rd edition), SAGE Publications Ltd, Extreme Situations, P153

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