Boundaries in Bioethics: Stuart J. Youngner, MD Professor and Chair Bioethics Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, O...
Boundaries in Bioethics <ul><li>Some important bioethics boundaries </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Human/Animal, Interspecies, ...
 
 
 
By what authority/methodology are Boundary Lines Identified and Located? <ul><li>By Science? </li></ul><ul><li>By Analytic...
Motives for Crossing or Blurring Boundaries <ul><li>By Mistake </li></ul><ul><li>Out of Curiosity </li></ul><ul><li>Person...
Motives for Respecting  or Defending Boundaries <ul><li>Political Strategy </li></ul><ul><li>Fear of change </li></ul><ul>...
Reactions to the Crossing or Blurring of Boundaries <ul><li>Moral Outrage </li></ul><ul><li>Disgust </li></ul><ul><li>Ange...
Three Ways of Thinking About Why Crossing Boundaries is Upsetting <ul><li>Evolutionary Protection against Pathogens </li><...
 
 
 
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Cetmons boundaries in bioethics

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Cetmons boundaries in bioethics

  1. 1. Boundaries in Bioethics: Stuart J. Youngner, MD Professor and Chair Bioethics Case Western Reserve University Cleveland, Ohio
  2. 2. Boundaries in Bioethics <ul><li>Some important bioethics boundaries </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Human/Animal, Interspecies, Race </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Male/Female </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Human/Machine </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>How do we identify and locate boundaries? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>After all, we can’t use surveyors’ instruments or a GPS </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Motives for crossing or blurring boundaries </li></ul><ul><li>The “best way” to understand and deal with boundaries in pluralistic civil societies </li></ul>The New Republic, June 2, 1997, pp 17-28.
  3. 6. By what authority/methodology are Boundary Lines Identified and Located? <ul><li>By Science? </li></ul><ul><li>By Analytic Philosophy—e.g., conceptually logical and consistent categories? </li></ul><ul><li>By Belief, religious or otherwise, not subject to evidence? </li></ul><ul><li>Blind trust of authority? </li></ul><ul><li>By History and Tradition—they are simply “there”? </li></ul><ul><li>By intuition? By our emotional repugnance? </li></ul>
  4. 7. Motives for Crossing or Blurring Boundaries <ul><li>By Mistake </li></ul><ul><li>Out of Curiosity </li></ul><ul><li>Personal Advantage (Correction of Disadvantage) </li></ul><ul><li>Self Fulfillment </li></ul><ul><li>Personal Necessity </li></ul><ul><li>Social Necessity </li></ul>
  5. 8. Motives for Respecting or Defending Boundaries <ul><li>Political Strategy </li></ul><ul><li>Fear of change </li></ul><ul><li>Fear—of punishment (law, God, parents, police) </li></ul><ul><li>Fear of rejection, isolation </li></ul><ul><li>Boundaries protect important moral values??? </li></ul>
  6. 9. Reactions to the Crossing or Blurring of Boundaries <ul><li>Moral Outrage </li></ul><ul><li>Disgust </li></ul><ul><li>Anger </li></ul><ul><li>Excitement </li></ul><ul><li>Fear </li></ul><ul><li>When these feeling strong enough, border crossing called Abominable: worthy of or causing disgust or hatred </li></ul>
  7. 10. Three Ways of Thinking About Why Crossing Boundaries is Upsetting <ul><li>Evolutionary Protection against Pathogens </li></ul><ul><li>Disrupts Self Identity and Body Image </li></ul><ul><li>Disrupts ordering of society or cosmos </li></ul>The New Republic, June 2, 1997, pp 17-28.

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