37.7%
34.0%
40.3%
33.6%
36.1%
23.4%
23.4%
33.0%
33.8%
29.2%
28.6%
23.5%
22.2%
25.9%
23.4%
22.7%
26.2%
24.0%
27.3%
21.7%
24...
36.0%
43.0%
38.2%
25.0%
29.0%
26.0%
41.0%
15.0%
23.0%
28.0%
28.0%
16.0%
20.0%
33.8%
32%
36.9%
42.2%
47.7%
10.0%
15.0%
20.0...
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Heartland 2050 meeting 4
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Heartland 2050 meeting 4

629 views

Published on

Steering Committee information about Agriculture, Economic Development and Education

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
629
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Latinos- projected to be 25%+ of region’s population by 2050 Rural vs urban is overarching theme in all categories!!!
  • DUPLICATE OF PREVIOUS SLIDE SHOWN IN DIFFERENT CHART TYPE- I PREFER THIS ONE!!!!Urban areas tend to have higher higher-level educated -note ~25% of all counties have “Some college, no degree”; could mean non-degree specialty training trades-Douglas and Sarpy have lowest HS grad rates (23.4%) but highest college grad rates (all college grad= ~35%)Harrison has highest HS grad rate (40%) and lowest college grad rates; less demand for high educated employment?
  • This map provides a base in which to compare areas of high poverty with educational attainment levels
  • Nebraska 9.2%; Iowa 10.0%; US 7.6%
  • Nebraska 8.9%; Iowa 7.7%; US 10.5%
  • Nebraska 18.9%; Iowa 17.2%; US 17.7%
  • This map identifies all public and private schools buildings for NE (389); public for Iowa (56)- total of 445- School buildings adopt poverty rate of census block group in which they are located - Color coded order: green (lowest rate of poverty), yellow, orange, light red, and dark red (highest rate of poverty)
  • This chart shows a breakdown of race and ethnicity in our region by decade. Two key trends here are that the non‐white population in the region has increased from around 8% in the 1970s to nearly 25% now, and that the Hispanic/Latino population has increased during that time sevenfold. The Asian population in our region nearly doubled over the last decade as well.How does this impact how we teach? Where are these new populations
  • This map identifies all public and private schools buildings for NE (389); public for Iowa (56)- total of 445- School buildings adopt poverty rate of census block group in which they are located - Color coded order: green (lowest rate of poverty), yellow, orange, light red, and dark red (highest rate of poverty)
  • This map identifies all public and private schools buildings for NE (389); public for Iowa (56)- total of 445- School buildings adopt poverty rate of census block group in which they are located - Color coded order: green (lowest rate of poverty), yellow, orange, light red, and dark red (highest rate of poverty)
  • This map identifies all public and private schools buildings for NE (389); public for Iowa (56)- total of 445- School buildings adopt poverty rate of census block group in which they are located - Color coded order: green (lowest rate of poverty), yellow, orange, light red, and dark red (highest rate of poverty)
  • MAP- show % change in population by school districts/ buildings; using school census
  • NE- 46.2% enrolled; Public 55.7% vs Private 44.3%IA-48.0% enrolled; Public 64.1% vs Private 35.9%US- 48.1% enrolled; Public 54.6% vs Private 45.4%
  • This slide shows workforce totals for the Omaha area from 2008 through 2012. Unemployment began to rise in correlation with the national economic recession, peaking at 5.2% in 2010. The average unemployment rate for the region in the last 20 years is 3.6%.
  • This table compares regional employment in 2012 to the balance of the U.S.It is significant to note that in all cases, average annual pay trails national averages significantly, though a low regional cost of living has been cited to offset lower pay. Due to the high number of employed and concentration of diverse employment opportunities, it should not be a surprise that Douglas County’s annual average pay per employee is closer to the U.S. average. However, it may be unexpected to some that Washington County has the highest average annual pay in the Omaha area at 97.4% the national average. The presence of Cargill and Novozymes , two international companies that require highly educated and trained professionals, no doubt contribute to the higher than regional average wages.
  • This chart compares the Omaha MSA’s unemployment rate with the national average. The Omaha area’s unemployment rate has consistently remained below the national average. The Omaha area has not experienced any dramatic spikes in unemployment, even when the national average hovered near 10% at the end of the last decade. Many mainstream economists have identified 4.0% unemployment as an acceptable level of unemployment. In nearly all economies, there will be some proportion of unemployable persons due to lack of education, criminal background, medical condition, and so on. What this graph does not signify is the prevalence of underemployed workers in the Omaha area, those who are overqualified for their current positions or those who cannot find full-time work. Previous labor impact studies performed by the Greater Omaha Chamber of Commerce have shown underemployment in the Omaha area is between 20-25%. Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • This chart compares the Omaha MSA’s unemployment rate over a three year period with ten “peer regions.” The metro regions of Denver, Kansas City and Minneapolis are included in the peer grouping based more on proximity, rather than population, economic output, etc. The remaining peer regions are more in tune with the Omaha MSA based on population, demographics, and numerous economic indicators. The Omaha area’s unemployment rate in recent years has been one of the lowest among metropolitan areas in a 500 mile radius of the region. Underemployment is not factored into the applicable unemployment rates. Though participation rates might further illustrate the status of employment/unemployment in the area compared to peer regions, such data is not currently available at the local level. Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics
  • This table compares employment distribution with the U.S. Distribution of employment by industry in the Omaha area is generally in line with the U.S.
  • This table shows the growth of business establishments by county from 1990 to 2010. Sarpy County by far had the greatest increase in business establishments in the last 20 plus years. Most business establishments are small businesses; 53% of all establishments have fewer than five employees.
  • These are the top 25 largest employers in the Omaha MSA. Many of the companies/institutions listed above have had a constant presence on previous major employer lists. Healthcare, education and government are heavily represented. It is important to note that several of the area’s top employers are not on local tax rolls (e.g. Offutt, public school districts, universities, public utilities, and local governments).
  • This chart shows the distribution of the Omaha area’s major industries. Service is the dominant industry; the sectors that predominantly encompass the service industry are education and healthcare. Source: Greater Omaha Chamber of Commerce
  • The Omaha MSA is unique for a region of its size in that the area is home to five Fortune 500 companies (Berkshire Hathaway, Union Pacific, ConAgra Foods, Peter Kiewit Sons’, and Mutual of Omaha). In addition, more than 50 Fortune 500 Companies maintain major manufacturing plants or service operations in the area. Some of these companies include Kellogg’s, Lockheed Martin, Tyson Foods, 3M, Aflac, Google, First Data, Pacific Life, Northrop Grumman, and Yahoo!. In short, business and industry clusters in the Omaha area are very well diversified.
  • This chart compares the Omaha area’s GDP with peer region GDPs. The larger metropolitan areas of Denver, Kansas City and Minneapolis obviously have greater GDPs. However, the Omaha area’s GDP is more comparable with the mid-sized MSAs in a 500 mile radius. Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Labor Analysis (data current as of 2011)
  • This graph shows per capita real GDP for the Omaha area and peer regions. The Omaha MSA has the 5th highest per capita GDP among peer regions. Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Labor Analysis (data current as of 2011)
  • This table shows net taxable sales by county over a three year period and the percent change over time. Sarpy and Washington counties had significant increases of their taxable sales. Pottawattamie County’s turnaround is also significant in that the county experienced a significant loss in taxable sales in 2011. It is likely that a factor in the county’s decline that year was the Missouri River flood. Regions along the river were inundated with floodwaters for a period of approximately four months. Transportation routes, especially in Pottawattamie County, were closed for most of the summer and there is no doubt that those closures impacted commerce. Though Douglas County does dominate the region’s share of total net taxable sales, growth has lagged behind some other jurisdictions recently.
  • This chart shows recorded residential building permits from 2004 to 2012. Recorded residential building permits declined for 6 consecutive years since 2005, no doubt in conjunction with the national economic recession. A positive upswing occurred in 2012 and it is anticipated that the positive trend will continue in the near foreseeable future. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Building Permits Survey
  • This chart shows PCPI by county in the Omaha area. PCPI did decrease in six Omaha MSA counties in 2010. Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Labor Analysis (data current as of 2011)
  • This graph compares the Omaha area’s PCPI with peer regions. The Omaha MSA’s PCPI is 5th highest among peer regions represented (behind Denver, Minneapolis, Madison, and Des Moines). Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Labor Analysis (data current as of 2011)
  • The Omaha area has consistently had a lower than national average cost of living. The Omaha MSA had the lowest composite cost of living compared to identified peer regions in the first quarter of 2013.
  • An elected member of a County Board of Supervisors are charged with county road maintenance, bridges, county sheriff, economic development, and others.
  • In our area, agriculture and ag-production includes grain, animal production, fruits and veggies. There are secondary stakeholders to consider: dealers: tractors and trailer, grain, chemical, fertilizer, equipment, seed, fuel, repair shops, etc. Also tertiary stakeholders: banks, hardware stores, local cafes, dirt-work (terraces, water ways), and more. Well known commodities include beef, corn and soybeans. Lesser known include dry edible beans, honey and Christmas trees. Popular to urban residents include fruits & vegetables (organic, farmers markets and pick your own) as well as grapes & wine. The way livestock is grown has changed from small family farms with approximately 30 head has been replaced by large scale producers with confinements (pork or chicken) and feed lots (beef).
  • Like the rest of the world, our region is growing and is expected to double by 2050 which is a main reason for the Heartland 2050 project. Iowa and Nebraska agriculture lead the nation the production of: Corn (IA #1; NE is #3) Soybeans (IA is #2; NE is #5) Cattle (NE is #2 in fed-cattle production; IA is #6) Hogs (IA is #1; NE is #5)
  • 1975 is earliest data is available. Very narrow profit margins and there is no consistency from year to year. Wise investing is necessary so that you can withstand/balance the little years with the big years. Marketing strategies sometimes require a farmer to sell a crop that isn’t yet in the ground. Operating Costs include: Seed, fertilizer; chemicals; custom operations; fuel, lube, and electricity; repairs; and interest on operating capital. Allocated overhead includes: Labor; Capital recovery of machinery and equipment; Rental rates; taxes and insurance; and general farm overhead. Agricultural production in the United States is a business that requires very high capital investments in land, facilities, and machines and most often produces undifferentiated products (commodities) of generally low unit value.  Thin profit margins have forced producers to seek efficiencies in all aspects of production.  There are efficiencies of scale that favor large producers who can make the most effective use of large, expensive machines.  In crops such as corn and soybeans, and in poultry and animal production commercially viability is usually based on producing "in volume.“ – Source: EPA
  • In 3rd grade everyone learns about the 3 primary components of our world: land, air and water. Water quality and quantity is a major concern throughout the world. Above table notes water usage for agricultural, domestic and industrial uses. In North America, Ag uses less water than industrial uses. This is attributed to advancements in the efficiency of hybrid technology – more gain production with less water.
  • Most farmers take pride and are good steward of the land. Very conscience that new land/topsoil can’t be created. Government programs fund conservation measures that help protect water quality and top soil. Water feeding the need of the urban area, specifically industrial uses. Lawn fertilizer issue in urban area – runs off lawns, into storm drain and untreated into Missouri and other tributaries – some communities no longer allow phosphorus fertilizer to be used. Nutrient loading of water bodies – Water recreation in the metro are affected by run off which contributes to sediment and nutrient load Gulf of Mexico – we are seeing serious sediment/nitrogen/… issues in that ecosystem that come from the Mississippi and its tributaries – large portion attributed to urban areas, not ag.
  • National Corn Growers Association is part of Field to Market: The Keystone Alliance for Sustainable Agriculture, a collaborative stakeholder group involving producers, agribusinesses, food and retail companies, and conservation organizations striving to develop a supply chain system for agricultural sustainability. Conservation and sustainabilityresearch creates many jobs. An average of 41% of total land acres were put into corn production in Harrison, Mills and Pottawattamie during the 2012 growing season.
  • Most rural areas are or can be made suitable for farming. Prime farmland - discussion: What is the highest and best use of prime farmland? Undeveloped land is viewed as endless here. Although infrastructure already exists within our urban areas, redevelopment generally does not happen in these areas in favor of undeveloped land. Centurylink and Gallop along riverfront are examples of redevelopment.
  • Issues: Zoning is necessary to protect uses Hop-scotch development Counties on edge of metro have found the need to educate farmers that they are still open to agriculture Washington is working through the process to become a Livestock Friendly County as defined by Nebraska Department of Agriculture Education Transition from urban to rural life - struggle to educate about agricultural ‘normals’ (dust, smell, road grater doesn’t maintain your driveway, etc) Safety issues – slow moving, large equipment on roads There isn’t a defined boundary where one starts and one ends Infrastructure Project costs are up while funding is flat or down Unable to maintain existing infrastructure New infrastructure for developments is a challenge Unfunded mandates Battle of road funding with urban areas Many rural communities do not have plans for growth – trying to maintain what they haveOpportunities: Increased tax base New jobs Partnerships – Douglas County and City of Omaha
  • Rural infrastructure is a challenge to maintain. As a result, some bridges and roads are closed or weight limits are reduced to avoid costly improvements. Increased size of machinery and bushel capacity creates increased challenge. Need good roads to get product out – generally starts on secondary road. Sustainability of development goes back to availability of infrastructure.
  • How much will they produce? How much will they need? Brazil, Argentina, China and others. These markets are growing and
  • Fewer people are needed on the farm due to larger more efficient machinery. Jobs are moving to Cargill, ConAgra, Bungee, local elevators, etc. Largest employers for some rural communities include elevators and lockers. 1 in 3 Nebraska jobs are result of Agribusiness activity Farmers don’t just produce food. Commodities go into bio-fuels and so much more.How are ag-producers staying current on technology, education, and investments? Quality elementary, middle, and high-school education; Investments in ag-vocational and ag-education; County extension offices; High-speed data to rural areas remains a challenge (comparable to electrification ~1920s and ‘30s); Private companies provide continuing education (Monsanto, as an example); Continued accessibility to data, information, experts, and current world events is crucial; Continued and open access to markets (grain dealers; packing plants; local farmers’ markets; etc)
  • Heartland 2050 meeting 4

    1. 1. 37.7% 34.0% 40.3% 33.6% 36.1% 23.4% 23.4% 33.0% 33.8% 29.2% 28.6% 23.5% 22.2% 25.9% 23.4% 22.7% 26.2% 24.0% 27.3% 21.7% 24.1% 21.0% 10.0% 10.9% 9.1% 9.0% 11.5% 9.5% 6.8% 9.9% 10.0% 9.2% 7.6% 12.6% 17.0% 12.5% 20.9% 16.1% 24.1% 23.7% 16.1% 17.2% 18.9% 17.7% 5.1% 7.1% 1.4% 6.6% 6.7% 11.4% 12.1% 7.6% 7.7% 8.9% 10.5% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% Pottawattamie Mills Harrison Washington Saunders Sarpy Douglas Cass Iowa Nebraska USA HS Graduate/GED Some college, no degree Associate's degree Bachelor's degree Masters/Doctorate
    2. 2. 36.0% 43.0% 38.2% 25.0% 29.0% 26.0% 41.0% 15.0% 23.0% 28.0% 28.0% 16.0% 20.0% 33.8% 32% 36.9% 42.2% 47.7% 10.0% 15.0% 20.0% 25.0% 30.0% 35.0% 40.0% 45.0% 50.0% 55.0% 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
    3. 3. • • • •
    4. 4. • • • • •
    5. 5. • • •
    6. 6. • • •

    ×