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School and community social influence programming for preventing tobacco and drug use: Evidence and implications for Public Health

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School and community social influence programming for preventing tobacco and drug use: Evidence and implications for Public Health

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Description

Health Evidence hosted a 90 minute webinar on substance use prevention and treatment interventions in children and adolescents, funded by the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse. This webinar presented key messages and implications for practice.

This webinar focussed on interpreting the evidence in the following review, which synthesizes evidence related to social influence programming:

Skara, S. & Sussman, S. (2003). A review of 25 long-term adolescent tobacco and other drug use prevention program evaluations. Preventive Medicine (37) 451-474.

Transcript

  1. 1. This webinar has been made possible with support from the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse Welcome! School and community social influence programming for preventing tobacco and drug use: Evidence and implications for public health You will be placed on hold until the webinar begins. The webinar will begin shortly, please remain on the line.
  2. 2. Participant Side Panel in WebEx Housekeeping Use Q&A to post comments/questions during the webinar •‘Send’ questions to All (not privately to ‘Host’) Connection issues •Recommend using a wired Internet connection (vs. wireless), to help Q&A prevent connection challenges  WebEx 24/7 help line: 1-866-229-3239
  3. 3. The Health Evidence Team Kara DeCorby Heather Husson Robyn Traynor Managing Director Project Manager Research Coordinator Maureen Dobbins Scientific Director Tel: 905 525-9140 ext 22481 E-mail: dobbinsm@mcmaster.ca Lori Greco Yaso Gowrinathan Knowledge Broker Research Assistant/Coordinator
  4. 4. What is www.healthevidence.org? Evidence inform Decision Making
  5. 5. Why use www.healthevidence.org? 1. Saves you time 2. Relevant & current evidence 3. Transparent process 4. Supports for EIDM available 5. Easy to use
  6. 6. Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse Project
  7. 7. About CCSA • National non-profit organization; ~ 50 staff • Vision: All Canadians should live in a healthy society, free of alcohol and drugs-related harm • Mission: Provide national leadership and advance solutions to address alcohol and other drug-related harm • Initiate change through partnerships and knowledge www.ccsa.ca • www.cclt.ca 7
  8. 8. What is CCSA’s SystemAction? • National knowledge exchange network of diverse networks across Canada • Facilitates exchange of research evidence to inform addictions related prevention and treatment practices • Public/private online space to share information and contacts • For more information, contact  Rod Olfert (rolfert@ccsa.ca), or  Rebecca Jesseman (rjesseman@ccsa.ca) 8
  9. 9. A Model for Evidence-Informed Decision Making Client, community, Community political preferences Context Clinician expertise Research Resources evidence Adapted with permission from National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools. (revised 2012). A Model for Evidence- Informed Decision-Making in Public Health. [fact sheet]. Retrieved from http://www.nccmt.ca/pubs/FactSheet_EIDM_EN_WEB.pdf
  10. 10. Evidence-Informed Decision Making 1. Cultivate a culture of inquiry, critical thinking and evidence-based practice “culture” 2. Ask a clear, focused, searchable question 3. Search for the best available evidence 4. Critically appraise the relevant evidence
  11. 11. Evidence-Informed Decision Making 5. Integrate the evidence with expertise and client preference 6. Evaluate the outcome(s) of the change in practice or policy 7. Engage in knowledge exchange
  12. 12. Importance of this Review • Canadian youth are the highest users of marijuana world wide • Using strong quality evidence to understand what works in prevention for tobacco and drug use • Examining the long-term effectiveness of social influence programs for adolescent substance use
  13. 13. Review Skara, S. & Sussman, S. (2003). A review of 25 long- term adolescent tobacco and other drug use prevention program evaluations. Preventive Medicine (37) 451-474.
  14. 14. Who has heard of a PICO(T) question before? 1. Yes 2. No
  15. 15. Searchable Questions – Does it work Think “PICOS” 1. Population (situation) 2. Intervention (exposure) 3. Comparison (other group) 4. Outcomes 5. Setting
  16. 16. Summary Statement: Skara (2003) P adolescents 12-15, and 16-19, in the transition period between junior high and high school I school or community social influence programming for the prevention of tobacco and drug use C other intervention or usual care O primary outcomes: long-term tobacco use, smoking initiation; secondary outcomes: alcohol and marijuana use Quality Rating: 8 (strong)
  17. 17. Social Influences Programming • Not defined explicitly in the review itself. • Working definition: Social influences programming increases the awareness of the social influences on substance-use behaviours-- family, peer, and media-- and provides normative information and skill instruction to resist such pressures.
  18. 18. Overall Considerations Relatively consistent findings for social influence programming, mainly delivered in schools, to reduce both tobacco use rates and other drug use (marijuana, alcohol) in adolescents 12-19, in transition period between junior high and high school in the long term (from 2 to 15 years). Interventions which either offered booster sessions or programming over longer time frames appeared to enhance maintenance of program effects at least to end of study The school setting offers good potential to address tobacco, marijuana, and alcohol use reduction
  19. 19. General Implications Public health should promote/support/implement: Social influence programming for adolescents 12-19, to reduce BOTH tobacco and other drug use (marijuana, alcohol) in the long term (at least 24 months and beyond). Either booster sessions or curriculum delivered over a longer time frame, for long-term maintenance of program effects
  20. 20. What’s the evidence - Outcomes reported in the review Tobacco use (total 25 studies, 17 of which assessed outcomes via difference in % smoking between intervention and control groups from baseline to follow up) Other drug use – alcohol & marijuana (9 studies providing long-term data)
  21. 21. What’s the evidence - Tobacco Use Tobacco use (total 25 studies, 17 of which assessed outcomes via difference in % smoking between intervention and control groups from baseline to follow up) • 15 of 25 studies reported at least one long-term (at least 2 years) positive effect (reductions in ever, daily, weekly, or monthly smoking) • 11 of 17 studies that reported tobacco use from baseline to follow up found 11.4% lower smoking rates (range 9-14%) from intervention group and control group • Of studies specifying booster sessions or programming delivered over two- year time frames (total 14 studies), 57% maintained long-term reductions in use by the end of study
  22. 22. What’s the evidence - Alcohol & Marijuana Use Alcohol & Marijuana Use (9 studies with long-term data) • 8 of 9 studies reported initial or interim positive impact for follow up periods ranging 3 months to 5 years. For 6 of these 8 projects, maintenance effects persisted the entire duration of the project. • Studies calculating % reduction in use rates from baseline to follow up found a long-term reduction ranging from 6.9-11.7% for weekly alcohol use (2 studies) and 5.7% reduction for 30-day marijuana use (1 study) • Of 7 studies specifying booster sessions, 5 of 7 studies maintained long-term reductions in use by the end of study
  23. 23. General Implications Public health should promote/support/implement: Social influence programming for adolescents 12-19, to reduce BOTH tobacco and other drug use (marijuana, alcohol) in the long term (at least 24 months and beyond). Either booster sessions or curriculum delivered over a longer time frame, for long-term maintenance of program effects
  24. 24. Questions?
  25. 25. Contact Us info@healthevidence.org

Description

Health Evidence hosted a 90 minute webinar on substance use prevention and treatment interventions in children and adolescents, funded by the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse. This webinar presented key messages and implications for practice.

This webinar focussed on interpreting the evidence in the following review, which synthesizes evidence related to social influence programming:

Skara, S. & Sussman, S. (2003). A review of 25 long-term adolescent tobacco and other drug use prevention program evaluations. Preventive Medicine (37) 451-474.

Transcript

  1. 1. This webinar has been made possible with support from the Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse Welcome! School and community social influence programming for preventing tobacco and drug use: Evidence and implications for public health You will be placed on hold until the webinar begins. The webinar will begin shortly, please remain on the line.
  2. 2. Participant Side Panel in WebEx Housekeeping Use Q&A to post comments/questions during the webinar •‘Send’ questions to All (not privately to ‘Host’) Connection issues •Recommend using a wired Internet connection (vs. wireless), to help Q&A prevent connection challenges  WebEx 24/7 help line: 1-866-229-3239
  3. 3. The Health Evidence Team Kara DeCorby Heather Husson Robyn Traynor Managing Director Project Manager Research Coordinator Maureen Dobbins Scientific Director Tel: 905 525-9140 ext 22481 E-mail: dobbinsm@mcmaster.ca Lori Greco Yaso Gowrinathan Knowledge Broker Research Assistant/Coordinator
  4. 4. What is www.healthevidence.org? Evidence inform Decision Making
  5. 5. Why use www.healthevidence.org? 1. Saves you time 2. Relevant & current evidence 3. Transparent process 4. Supports for EIDM available 5. Easy to use
  6. 6. Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse Project
  7. 7. About CCSA • National non-profit organization; ~ 50 staff • Vision: All Canadians should live in a healthy society, free of alcohol and drugs-related harm • Mission: Provide national leadership and advance solutions to address alcohol and other drug-related harm • Initiate change through partnerships and knowledge www.ccsa.ca • www.cclt.ca 7
  8. 8. What is CCSA’s SystemAction? • National knowledge exchange network of diverse networks across Canada • Facilitates exchange of research evidence to inform addictions related prevention and treatment practices • Public/private online space to share information and contacts • For more information, contact  Rod Olfert (rolfert@ccsa.ca), or  Rebecca Jesseman (rjesseman@ccsa.ca) 8
  9. 9. A Model for Evidence-Informed Decision Making Client, community, Community political preferences Context Clinician expertise Research Resources evidence Adapted with permission from National Collaborating Centre for Methods and Tools. (revised 2012). A Model for Evidence- Informed Decision-Making in Public Health. [fact sheet]. Retrieved from http://www.nccmt.ca/pubs/FactSheet_EIDM_EN_WEB.pdf
  10. 10. Evidence-Informed Decision Making 1. Cultivate a culture of inquiry, critical thinking and evidence-based practice “culture” 2. Ask a clear, focused, searchable question 3. Search for the best available evidence 4. Critically appraise the relevant evidence
  11. 11. Evidence-Informed Decision Making 5. Integrate the evidence with expertise and client preference 6. Evaluate the outcome(s) of the change in practice or policy 7. Engage in knowledge exchange
  12. 12. Importance of this Review • Canadian youth are the highest users of marijuana world wide • Using strong quality evidence to understand what works in prevention for tobacco and drug use • Examining the long-term effectiveness of social influence programs for adolescent substance use
  13. 13. Review Skara, S. & Sussman, S. (2003). A review of 25 long- term adolescent tobacco and other drug use prevention program evaluations. Preventive Medicine (37) 451-474.
  14. 14. Who has heard of a PICO(T) question before? 1. Yes 2. No
  15. 15. Searchable Questions – Does it work Think “PICOS” 1. Population (situation) 2. Intervention (exposure) 3. Comparison (other group) 4. Outcomes 5. Setting
  16. 16. Summary Statement: Skara (2003) P adolescents 12-15, and 16-19, in the transition period between junior high and high school I school or community social influence programming for the prevention of tobacco and drug use C other intervention or usual care O primary outcomes: long-term tobacco use, smoking initiation; secondary outcomes: alcohol and marijuana use Quality Rating: 8 (strong)
  17. 17. Social Influences Programming • Not defined explicitly in the review itself. • Working definition: Social influences programming increases the awareness of the social influences on substance-use behaviours-- family, peer, and media-- and provides normative information and skill instruction to resist such pressures.
  18. 18. Overall Considerations Relatively consistent findings for social influence programming, mainly delivered in schools, to reduce both tobacco use rates and other drug use (marijuana, alcohol) in adolescents 12-19, in transition period between junior high and high school in the long term (from 2 to 15 years). Interventions which either offered booster sessions or programming over longer time frames appeared to enhance maintenance of program effects at least to end of study The school setting offers good potential to address tobacco, marijuana, and alcohol use reduction
  19. 19. General Implications Public health should promote/support/implement: Social influence programming for adolescents 12-19, to reduce BOTH tobacco and other drug use (marijuana, alcohol) in the long term (at least 24 months and beyond). Either booster sessions or curriculum delivered over a longer time frame, for long-term maintenance of program effects
  20. 20. What’s the evidence - Outcomes reported in the review Tobacco use (total 25 studies, 17 of which assessed outcomes via difference in % smoking between intervention and control groups from baseline to follow up) Other drug use – alcohol & marijuana (9 studies providing long-term data)
  21. 21. What’s the evidence - Tobacco Use Tobacco use (total 25 studies, 17 of which assessed outcomes via difference in % smoking between intervention and control groups from baseline to follow up) • 15 of 25 studies reported at least one long-term (at least 2 years) positive effect (reductions in ever, daily, weekly, or monthly smoking) • 11 of 17 studies that reported tobacco use from baseline to follow up found 11.4% lower smoking rates (range 9-14%) from intervention group and control group • Of studies specifying booster sessions or programming delivered over two- year time frames (total 14 studies), 57% maintained long-term reductions in use by the end of study
  22. 22. What’s the evidence - Alcohol & Marijuana Use Alcohol & Marijuana Use (9 studies with long-term data) • 8 of 9 studies reported initial or interim positive impact for follow up periods ranging 3 months to 5 years. For 6 of these 8 projects, maintenance effects persisted the entire duration of the project. • Studies calculating % reduction in use rates from baseline to follow up found a long-term reduction ranging from 6.9-11.7% for weekly alcohol use (2 studies) and 5.7% reduction for 30-day marijuana use (1 study) • Of 7 studies specifying booster sessions, 5 of 7 studies maintained long-term reductions in use by the end of study
  23. 23. General Implications Public health should promote/support/implement: Social influence programming for adolescents 12-19, to reduce BOTH tobacco and other drug use (marijuana, alcohol) in the long term (at least 24 months and beyond). Either booster sessions or curriculum delivered over a longer time frame, for long-term maintenance of program effects
  24. 24. Questions?
  25. 25. Contact Us info@healthevidence.org

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