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Promoting your research using social media

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Doctoral workshop on using social media to promote research delivered at McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada, 4th November 2015

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Promoting your research using social media

  1. 1. Promoting your research using social media Doctoral workshop presented at McMaster University Hamilton, Canada 4th November 2015 http://hazelhall.org http://slideshare.net/hazelhall @hazelh
  2. 2. http://hazelhall.org/about
  3. 3. Workshop topics 1. Established and new measures of academic impact 2. Consideration of the range of social media tools available to help promote your research and increase its potential impact (academic and wide) 3. Recommendations on which tools to use for developing an online presence as a researcher
  4. 4. Established measures of academic impact Bibliometric indicators measure “academic” impact of individuals’ output  Quantity and quality of publications  Quantity and quality of citations to those publications  Codified in citation databases
  5. 5. http://jis.sagepub.com/reports/most-cited
  6. 6. Established impact measures Bibliometric indicators measure “academic” impact  Quantity of publications  Quantity of citations to those publications http://webofknowledge.com
  7. 7. Alternative impact measures Altmetrics assess the impact of individual output using various criteria across a range of platforms  recommended by others  praised by opinion leaders  mentioned in social media  etc.  downloaded  acknowledged  included in syllabi  quoted in the press  cited in policy documents  Judgements of esteem rely on more than “mere” publication record.  Visibility is becoming increasingly important for personal research impact and the reputational benefits that this brings:  Collaboration approaches  Speaking invitations  Committee service
  8. 8. files.figshare.com/1067961/56_impacts_preprint_5_26_13.pdf Center for the Study of Interdisciplinarity (CSID), University of North Texas (2011)
  9. 9. http://hazelhall.org/2013/07/14/altmetrics-achieving-and-measuring-success-in-communicating-research-in-the-digital-age/
  10. 10. But what about wider impact? Research reach  policy  action  improvements Exploration of the extent to which LIS research projects influence practice (2011) Creation of outputs to support the use and execution of research by librarians and information scientists (2012)
  11. 11. http://lisresearchcoalition.files.wordpress.com/2012/02/rilies1_report.pdf
  12. 12. Activities to ensure that investment in research deliver social and economic benefit  Ensure project has high level support  Include target research audience(s) in the execution of the research  Take into account target audience(s) preferences for consuming research output  Present output in a way that is accessible to the target audience Much of this is about how the work is disseminated, in particular:  output format (content creation)  accessibility (sharing) - and this is where social media come in…
  13. 13. There are lots of places “to be”  (Local profiles)  CV services  e.g. LinkedIn  Resource sharing sites  e.g. Flickr, Pinterest, SlideShare, SoundCloud, Vimeo, YouTube  ID services  e.g. Orcid, ResearcherID  Profile services  e.g. Academia.edu, Google Scholar, ResearchGate  Blogging and microblogging platforms  e.g. CoverItLive, Medium, Quora, The Conversation, Tumblr, Twitter WordPress  Impact measurement tools  e.g. Klout  Collaboration sites  e.g. Citeulike, Mendeley  Social networking sites  e.g. Facebook, Google+, Lanyrd
  14. 14. So where should you be? For wide dissemination of publications  ID services (e.g. Orcid, ResearcherID) and research profile services (e.g. Academia.edu, Google Scholar, ResearchGate) For wide dissemination of presentations  Resource sharing sites (e.g. SlideShare, SoundCloud, Vimeo, YouTube) If you are interested in tracking your impact  Impact measurement tools (e.g. Klout) If you want to keep up to date/others updated  Twitter - and to provide a directory of it all  About.me
  15. 15. So where should you be: essentials? 1. Your CV on LinkedIn
  16. 16. 16
  17. 17. So where should you be: essentials? 1. Your CV on LinkedIn ✓ 2. Your academic identity registered on ID services (e.g. Orcid, ResearcherID)
  18. 18. So where should you be: essentials? 1. Your CV on LinkedIn ✓ 2. Your academic identity registered on ID services (e.g. Orcid, ResearcherID) ✓ 3. Your publication track record on profile services (e.g. Academia.edu, Google Scholar, ResearchGate)
  19. 19. So where should you be: essentials? 1. Your CV on LinkedIn ✓ 2. Your academic identity registered on ID services (e.g. Orcid, ResearcherID) ✓ 3. Your publication track record on profile services (e.g. Academia.edu, Google Scholar, ResearchGate) ✓ 4. Links to the above from About.me
  20. 20. Should you set up a personal blog? 1. Do you want/need a full “independent” online profile? 2. Do you enjoy writing? 3. Are you prepared to give up your free time to blog regularly? 4. What will be your communications strategy?  What will you call your blog?  What will it cover?  How often will you post to it?  How will you direct traffic to it?
  21. 21. Some blog examples Research students in the Centre for Social Informatics at Edinburgh Napier University  Iris Buunk: http://theknowledgeexplorer.org  @irisbuunk  Lyndsey Jenkins: http://lyndseyjenkins.org/  @LJenk2015  John Mowbray: http://johnmowbray.org  @jmowb_napier  Frances Ryan: http://justaphd.com  @cleverfrances
  22. 22. 25
  23. 23. Blog alternatives  In-house news platform  Update function on LinkedIn  Ad hoc blogging on Medium, guest contributions to The Conversation
  24. 24. Resources For further detail on individual services mentioned in this presentation see Using social media to promote your research by Hazel Hall. The London School of Economics blog Maximising the impact of academic research is well worth following Sharing the DREaM blueprint gives an account of how social media extended the reach of an AHRC project in 2011/12
  25. 25. social media planning 30 https://theconversation.com/mind-the-gender-gap-why-women-must-still-fight-for-equality-in-science-32923
  26. 26. Contact Hazel Hall http://hazelhall.org http://slideshare.net/hazelhall @hazelh h.hall@napier.ac.uk +44 0131 455 2760
  27. 27. Promoting your research using social media Doctoral workshop presented at McMaster University Hamilton, Canada 4th November 2015 http://hazelhall.org http://slideshare.net/hazelhall @hazelh

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