Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Information literacy in a volunteer workplace: the case of hyperlocal government in Scotland

454 views

Published on

Presentation delivered by Hazel Hall at Workplace Information Literacy workshop, Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland, 5th December 2017

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Information literacy in a volunteer workplace: the case of hyperlocal government in Scotland

  1. 1. Information literacy in a volunteer workplace: the case of hyperlocal government in Scotland Presentation by Professor Hazel Hall Centre for Social Informatics, Edinburgh Napier University Workshop on Workplace Information Literacy Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland 5th December 2017
  2. 2. http://hazelhall.org @hazelh Slides on SlideShare at http://slideshare.net/hazelhall
  3. 3. Information literacy for democratic engagement (IL-DEM) What are the practices of elected, unpaid community councillors in Scotland as they exploit information channels for democratic engagement with citizens? What are the practices of elected, unpaid community councillors in Scotland as they exploit information channels for democratic engagement with citizens?
  4. 4. IL-DEM team and funding Hazel Hall Peter Cruickshank Bruce Ryan
  5. 5. Hyperlocal democracy in Scotland Community councils 1,100 active in Scotland across 32 local authorities ‘employing’ ~10,000 community councillors Voting members (elected, co-opted) Non-voting, ex-officio members (e.g. MPs, MSPs)
  6. 6. http://www.communitycouncils.scot/community-council-finder.htmlhttp://www.communitycouncils.scot/community-council-finder.html
  7. 7. Hyperlocal democracy in Scotland Limited powers
  8. 8. Hyperlocal democracy in Scotland ‘Schemes’ specify roles and responsibilities Community councils are NOT bodies of government Community councils DO NOT deliver services Community councils CANNOT raise taxes or make regulations/law
  9. 9. http://www.edinburgh.gov.uk/downloads/file /1477/scheme_for_community_councils http://www.edinburgh.gov.uk/downloads/file /1477/scheme_for_community_councils
  10. 10. http://www.edinburgh.gov.uk/downloads/file /1477/scheme_for_community_councils http://www.edinburgh.gov.uk/downloads/file /1477/scheme_for_community_councils
  11. 11. http://www.ntbcc.org.uk/about/http://www.ntbcc.org.uk/about/
  12. 12. Community councillor known challenges A volunteer unpaid ‘workforce’ Elections uncontested Vacancies unfilled Insufficient members to undertake tasks Councillor demographics: people with time
  13. 13. Information sharing No/low/outdated information skills Unmediated and mixed channel information interactions Ambiguity over community councillor roles Citizen opinion  official bodies Official information  citizens? Community councillor known challenges
  14. 14. Primary research questions 1-3 How do community councillors… Access and understand information on their duties and rights? Keep up to date with local issues and developments of reference to the communities that they serve? Disseminate information to their communities?
  15. 15. Supplementary research questions 4 & 5 Training Where do future efforts need to be directed to improve the information skills and practices of community councillors? What is the role of public library staff in the training of community councillors?
  16. 16. Final supplementary research question 6 Impact of community councillors’ information literacies How do community councillors’ information literacies contribute to: Their communities? The building of social capital? Their, or others’, citizenships?
  17. 17. Empirical work Semi-structured interviews 19 participants in 1-hour interviews 5 themes Information literacy, behaviour and practices Lifelong learning, everyday life Libraries Communities, social capital and citizenship Becoming information literate Plus some desk research: audit of public library provision for community councils
  18. 18. SCONUL model to guide data collection For example, data collected to address RQ1 align with pillars 3 and 4 How do you go about finding information about your duties and rights? What sources do you use? How did you learn about them?
  19. 19. Activity Theory to guide data analysis https://www.slideshare.net/HazelHall/exploring-information- literacy-through-the-lens-of-activity-theory https://www.slideshare.net/HazelHall/exploring-information- literacy-through-the-lens-of-activity-theory
  20. 20. Main findings: RQs 1 and 2 RQ1 Community councillors learn about their roles primarily through materials supplied by local authorities RQ2 The information sharing role is bi-directional Local authorities are the primary information source – although not all needs can be met Patchy use of social media to access information
  21. 21. Main findings: RQs 3 and 4 RQ3 High attention to provenance and authority of information to be disseminated to citizens Many channels for dissemination - both digital and non- digital – though impact not evaluated RQ4 Information skills gaps, particularly around social media
  22. 22. Main findings: RQ5 RQ5 Just one local authority specifies means by which the public library service supports community councils Lack of awareness of library support amongst interviewees ‘Libraries don’t do much for me [because] everything is available online.’ ‘Libraries don’t do much for me [because] everything is available online.’
  23. 23. Main finding: RQ6 RQ6 Community councillors’ information literacies contribute to building and support of citizenship
  24. 24. Key issues and implications Low social media skills and use With associated impact on assessing information needs of citizens Explained by demographics, emphasis on provenance and authority, perceptions of time commitment Low profile of libraries Not visible as strong supporters of community council work
  25. 25. IL-DEM project recommendations Training Lobby, audit, delivery Perception of information skills Value to role to be emphasised by local authorities Public libraries Extend/make more visible the support role of public libraries
  26. 26. Find out more Community, knowledge, connections web site  https://community-knect.net/ Recent papers  Hall, H., Cruickshank, P. & Ryan, B. (2018 in press). Practices of community representatives in exploiting information channels for citizen democratic engagement. Journal of Librarianship and Information Science.  Hall, H., Cruickshank, P. & Ryan, B. (2017 in press). Exploring information literacy through the lens of Activity Theory. In: Proceedings of the 5th European Conference on Information Literacy (ECIL2017). New York: Springer. [Slides at https://www.slideshare.net/HazelHall/exploring- information-literacy-through-the-lens-of-activity-theory]
  27. 27. Information literacy in a volunteer workplace: the case of hyperlocal government in Scotland Presentation by Professor Hazel Hall Centre for Social Informatics, Edinburgh Napier University Workshop on Workplace Information Literacy Åbo Akademi University, Turku, Finland 5th December 2017

×