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On Refinishing and Staining Woodwork

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An Etsy store owner focused on vintage clothing and jewelry, Hayley Ninnis also recently purchased a house built in 1884 to restore and sell it. As part of her work, Hayley Ninnis is learning to refinish furniture and woodwork.

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On Refinishing and Staining Woodwork

  1. 1. ON REFINISHING AND STAINING WOODWORK By Hayley Ninnis
  2. 2. Introduction  An Etsy store owner focused on vintage clothing and jewelry, Hayley Ninnis also recently purchased a house built in 1884 to restore and sell it. As part of her work, Hayley Ninnis is learning to refinish furniture and woodwork. Refinishing woodwork for a cleaning project or a complete restoration can bring new beauty into a home. Before beginning any project, whether restoration of an old chair or improving faded millwork, check to make sure you have all of the proper tools and that nothing has dried up or become brittle. One factor to consider is the type of job and what type of stripper it will require.
  3. 3. Woodwork  For finish removal, use a thin stripper that is less likely to soak into the wood. For paint, which is thicker and tends to stick to the wood more, use a thick, clinging stripper. Other essential items include sandpaper or a power sander, the appropriate stains and finishes, and good cloths or brushes to apply the products. After stripping the wood, choosing a wood stain can determine whether the project will succeed and fail. Oil-based stains are some of the most popular and come in penetrating or pigmented (non-penetrating) varieties. Penetrating stains are wiped away after the wood has turned the desired color, which can create uneven coloring. Pigmented stains are best for lightening or slight darkening of hardwoods, but the color fades with time and must be sealed well. Non-grain-raising stains create a uniform color on hardwoods and do not bleed or fade. For projects in which the finish is still in good condition, the wood may only need to be cleaned to restore its color.

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