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COVID-19 // Media Behaviours Report Vol.4 // Havas Media UK POV

UK media consumption has continued to rise in the last two weeks, with huge gains across live TV, video, social media, and video streaming, according to the latest Havas Media Group COVID-19 Media Behaviours Report.

The fourth iteration of Havas Media Group’s COVID-19 Media Behaviours Report, a research study into consumer behavior and media consumption based on a survey of 1,487 UK respondents, shows that 64% of people claim to be watching more live TV than they did prior to the coronavirus outbreak (a net increase of 15% versus the first set of findings two weeks ago).

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COVID-19 // Media Behaviours Report Vol.4 // Havas Media UK POV

  1. 1. Covid–19 Media Behaviours Report 30th April 2020 Wave 4
  2. 2. We are currently living in truly unprecedented times, in which the lives of people, companies and communities are being totally disrupted. The dramatic change in our daily lives is having a huge impact on our behaviours and media consumption. As old routines are abandoned, new patterns are emerging. How and why are people accessing media? What are the big shifts in time spent? How has the role media plays changed? This report examines the key shifts in behaviour since the emergence of Covid-19. Introduction
  3. 3. • The research was commissioned by Havas Media Group, to understand the current impact of COVID-19 across a range of behaviours among UK citizens, with a focus on media consumption. We are repeating the research on a fortnightly basis to track the impact of the developing situation over time. • This presentation covers key findings and implications from the third wave of results. Fieldwork was carried out over a 24 hour period from 13-14 April. The sample size is 1,498 respondents, nationally representative with quotas set on age, gender and region. The following results are cut by age group; however we are able to analyse the results by gender, region and sector of employment should that be of interest. • In addition to the research we have undertaken an industry and market analysis alongside further desk research to give greater context and depth to the research results. • If you have any questions about the contents of this report please email: mediastrategyandinsight@havasmg.com CONTEXT A bit about this report Fieldwork dates Wave 1: 17-18 March Wave 2: 30-31 March Wave 3: 13-14 April Wave 4: 27-28 April _3
  4. 4. • While peoples behaviour has stabilised over the course of previous waves of this research, in this latest wave we are seeing small declines in people choosing to self isolate and small reductions in the places people are planning to avoid, likely in anticipation of the government relaxing lock down measures. • While anxiety is the predominant mental state, we are seeing it start to decline as people become accustomed to this new way of living. • Isolation and loneliness has come down from previous waves, although it remains a significant concern for 18-24s. • Media consumption continues to stabilise after the initial surge in the first weeks of lock down. Although younger audiences are starting to use less live TV after their surge in usage. • Use of social platforms remains fairly stable, and we are seeing small increases in use of Linkedin, reflecting the changing status of peoples employment the longer the situation continues. • Neftlix and Amazon continue to see increases in usage particularly against 18-24s and the over 65s. • Cleaning and cooking remain the top two things people are doing more of, however DIY sees a further rise this wave vs last wave as people continue to get round to doing all the house related jobs they’ve been putting off. • 18-24s are spending more online in clothing and health and beauty, possibly a mixture of boredom with the current state of living and hope of rules being relaxed in the near future. EXECUTIVESUMMARY Executive summary
  5. 5. CONSUMERMINDSET _5 While anxiety is the predominant mental state, it is slightly declining. We also see that feelings of isolation/loneliness have peaked and are now reducing, although this is a much bigger issue for younger people Impact of COVID-19 on mental wellbeing – TOTAL BY AGE, wave 4 only 28% 39% 22% 10% 19% 21% 6% 8% 4% 37% 41% 21% 18% 17% 12% 9% 10% 2% 40% 39% 18% 17% 15% 11% 10% 9% 2% 38% 35% 17% 15% 13% 11% 10% 10% 3% Well informed Anxious Overwhelmed Isolated / lonely Unsafe Confused More connected to my community Reassured Other Wave 1 Wave 2 Wave 3 Wave 4 Significantly higher/lower than previous wave What impact has news coverage of COVID-19 had on your mental wellbeing? 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Anxious 36% 35% 39% 36% 40% 25% Isolated / lonely 32% 17% 13% 12% 13% 8% Overwhelmed 26% 20% 22% 17% 12% 9% Well informed 26% 29% 34% 40% 43% 48% Unsafe 21% 10% 16% 10% 14% 11% Confused 19% 16% 13% 7% 11% 7% More connected to my community 11% 8% 9% 9% 12% 12% Reassured 6% 10% 11% 7% 10% 12% Other 1% 2% 1% 3% 3% 4%
  6. 6. LIFESTYLE _6 Working and social patterns remain largely unchanged this wave, although we are seeing significant decreases in those choosing to or being advised to self isolate Change in working situation – TOTAL Change in working situation, wave 4 – BY AGE Change in personal / social situation – TOTAL Change in personal / social situation, wave 4 – BY AGE 48% 8% 14% 18% 10% 3% 30% 21% 25% 15% 8% 2% 32% 23% 22% 15% 9% 2% 34% 21% 23% 12% 9% 1% There's been no change to my working pattern at all I’ve had to stop working altogether I am working from home all the time I am working from home more often I’m working reduced hours I’m working shifted hours (e.g. to accommodate childcare) Wave 1 Wave 2 Wave 3 Wave 4 53% 19% 15% 23% 60% 38% 22% 2% 65% 32% 20% 2% 66% 28% 17% 4% I’m taking part in social distancing and seeing less people I’ve chosen to self-isolate I’ve been advised / forced to self-isolate I've not changed my behaviour at all Wave 1 Wave 2 Wave 3 Wave 4 In light of the recent COVID-19 outbreak, at this point in time, which of the following apply to you? Significantly higher/lower than previous wave 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ WFH all the time 29% 31% 32% 26% 18% 7% Stopped working altogether 25% 22% 22% 27% 21% 12% No change 20% 21% 20% 23% 42% 64% WFH more often 18% 17% 18% 13% 10% 2% Working reduced hours 13% 12% 12% 14% 5% 2% Working shifted hours 2% 4% 3% 0% 0% 0% 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ I’m taking part in social distancing and seeing less people 65% 65% 68% 77% 66% 58% I’ve chosen to self-isolate 35% 34% 22% 19% 28% 33% I’ve been advised / forced to self-isolate 17% 13% 16% 12% 14% 25% I've not changed my behaviour at all 5% 5% 5% 4% 4% 4%
  7. 7. LIFESTYLE _7 As the lockdown continues, there is a drop in those who are avoiding certain places / events showing people are becoming less compliant, older audiences are more likely to observe the government guidelines Significantly higher/lower than previous wave What types places / events are you planning on avoiding in the coming weeks? Places / events planning to avoid in the coming weeks – TOTAL Places / events planning to avoid in the coming weeks, wave 4 – BY AGE 64% 62% 59% 60% 55% 53% 36% 32% 82% 80% 78% 76% 78% 73% 57% 60% 81% 78% 77% 76% 76% 74% 60% 57% 78% 75% 73% 74% 69% 71% 49% 50% Restaurants, pubs & bars Cinemas Public transport International travel Shopping centres Sports events Shops in general The workplace Wave 1 Wave 2 Wave 3 Wave 4 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Cinemas 67% 62% 71% 82% 81% 84% Restaurants, pubs & bars 66% 69% 71% 82% 85% 88% Shopping centres 66% 58% 63% 71% 76% 78% Sports events 62% 61% 64% 75% 79% 80% Public transport 60% 65% 69% 78% 78% 82% International travel 59% 62% 69% 81% 83% 85% The workplace 47% 44% 46% 53% 49% 56% Shops in general 45% 43% 51% 46% 43% 59%
  8. 8. Media behaviour changes
  9. 9. CHANNELCHANGES _9 While still elevated compared to the time before COVID-19, media consumption remains stable or decreases slightly further this wave. With the extension of lockdown conditions, it seems people are adjusting to their new normal Change in media channel usage, Wave 4 31% 29% 28% 27% 14% 14% 12% 12% 11% 7% 6% 3% 3% 27% 31% 32% 31% 21% 20% 22% 20% 18% 16% 12% 3% 4% 19% 26% 30% 28% 32% 24% 35% 27% 21% 35% 22% 5% 15% 2% 3% 4% 2% 6% 3% 10% 5% 3% 5% 4% 2% 6% 1% 2% 2% 2% 7% 3% 9% 2% 3% 6% 3% 57% 35% 20% 10% 5% 9% 21% 35% 12% 34% 44% 31% 54% 29% 37% Video streaming (e.g. Netflix, Amazon Prime) Visiting Social Media websites Watching live TV (on TV set or other device) Watching video on demand (e.g. iPlayer, Now TV, YouTube) Reading Newspapers (either physical copy or online) Mobile gaming (e.g. Candy Crush, Clash of Clans) Listening to the Radio Music streaming (e.g. Spotify, Deezer) PC & Console gaming. Reading Magazines (either physical copy or online) Listening to podcasts Visiting the Cinema Posters on street or on public transport Never did this Doing a lot less of Doing a bit less of Doing about the same amount Doing a bit more of Doing a lot more of NET doing more of (w3 VS. w2) -1% 0% -3% -2% 0% -1% -1% -2% 0% -1% -2% 0% 0% NET doing less of (w3 VS. w2) 0% 1% 1% 1% -1% 0% 2% 1% 1% 1% 1% -1% 0% How would you describe your use of the following media channels and platforms, compared to the time before COVID-19?
  10. 10. CHANNELCHANGES _10 Most channels see minor decreases wave on wave, most notably live TV. Social media and gaming remain flat, suggesting people are continuing to seek out light entertainment and connection. Consumption of newspapers also remains stable. Change in media channel usage, Wave 4 Change Wave 4 vs. Wave 3 NET DOING MORE OF NET DOING LESS OF Visiting Social Media websites 60% 4% Watching live TV (on TV set or other device) 59% 6% Watching video on demand (e.g. iPlayer, Now TV, YouTube) 58% 4% Video streaming (e.g. Netflix, Amazon Prime) 58% 3% Reading Newspapers (either physical copy or online) 35% 13% Mobile gaming (e.g. Candy Crush, Clash of Clans) 34% 6% Listening to the Radio 34% 19% Music streaming (e.g. Spotify, Deezer) 31% 7% PC & Console gaming. 29% 6% Reading Magazines (either physical copy or online) 23% 11% Listening to podcasts 18% 6% Posters on street or on public transport 6% 42% Visiting the Cinema 6% 59% How would you describe your use of the following media channels and platforms, compared to the time before COVID-19? TOTAL CHANGE IN DOING MORE OF TOTAL CHANGE IN DOING LESS OF 0% 1% -3% 1% -2% 1% -1% 0% 0% -1% -1% 0% -1% 2% -2% 1% 0% 1% -1% 1% -2% 1% 0% 0% 0% -1%
  11. 11. CHANNELCHANGES _11 18-24s show minor increases in video streaming, VOD and music streaming, but significant decreases in consumption of live TV and podcasts. After some increases last wave, 25-34s show decreased consumption of many channels Change in media channel usage wave 4, by age Change in use of media (Net doing more Wave 4 vs. Wave 3) How would you describe your use of the following media channels and platforms, compared to the time before COVID-19? NET DOING MORE OF: 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Video streaming (e.g. Netflix, Amazon Prime) 87% 74% 71% 60% 46% 29% Visiting Social Media websites 83% 71% 71% 58% 54% 38% Watching video on demand (e.g. iPlayer, Now TV, YouTube) 80% 67% 67% 58% 55% 37% Music streaming (e.g. Spotify, Deezer) 66% 50% 39% 26% 16% 9% Watching live TV (on TV set or other device) 59% 57% 64% 58% 68% 53% Mobile gaming (e.g. Candy Crush, Clash of Clans) 55% 48% 42% 37% 27% 9% PC & Console gaming. 53% 47% 34% 27% 19% 8% Reading Newspapers (either physical copy or online) 38% 38% 38% 36% 34% 28% Listening to the Radio 33% 37% 41% 33% 37% 26% Reading Magazines (either physical copy or online) 31% 30% 31% 22% 19% 14% Listening to podcasts 22% 33% 25% 19% 14% 3% Visiting the Cinema 16% 11% 7% 4% 3% 1% Posters on street or on public transport 9% 13% 11% 4% 4% 1% TOTAL 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ -1% 1% -7% -3% 2% -4% 1% 0% 0% -7% 0% -3% 3% 4% -2% 2% -13% -7% -1% 5% 0% -2% 1% -1% -3% -2% -5% -1% -3% -8% -11% -1% -2% 3% -1% -1% -2% -5% -4% 0% 9% -2% 0% -2% -3% 0% 3% 4% 0% 0% -3% 0% 2% 3% -3% 0% -1% -4% 0% 3% -4% 3% -2% -1% -4% -1% 2% 2% -3% -2% -2% -20% 1% -1% 3% -2% -2% 0% 2% -3% -3% 1% 1% 0% 0% -6% 0% 2% 1% 1% -1%
  12. 12. SOCIALMEDIA All social platforms have made gains in usage since COVID-19, although growth is now continuing to plateau. Interestingly, LinkedIn is showing the greatest gains this wave, a likely result of employment being impacted so heavily _12 Change in use of Social Media Platforms, Wave 4 Change in use of Social Media Platforms (Net using more Wave 4 Vs. Wave 3) 27% 27% 15% 9% 8% 7% 4% 3% 26% 24% 16% 13% 9% 8% 8% 4% 26% 22% 19% 22% 13% 8% 19% 9% 3% 3% 3% 3% 2% 2% 5% 2% 2% 2% 2% 3% 2% 1% 4% 2% 16% 23% 45% 50% 65% 74% 59% 80% Facebook WhatsApp Instagram Twitter Snapchat TikTok LinkedIn Twitch Never used this Using a lot less Using a bit less Using about the same amount Using a bit more Using a lot more How would you describe your use of the following social media platforms, compared to the time before COVID-19? TOTAL 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ LinkedIn 2% 2% 1% 1% 2% 5% 1% Facebook 2% 5% -3% 3% -5% 3% 7% TikTok 0% 2% 2% 0% -2% 1% -1% Twitch 0% -6% 0% 0% 1% 4% 1% WhatsApp -1% 3% -7% 1% 1% 2% -3% Snapchat -1% -5% -3% 3% -2% 0% -1% Instagram -1% 4% -6% 4% -3% -4% -1% Twitter -3% -4% 1% -5% -9% -1% 1%
  13. 13. SOCIALMEDIA In order to fight the ‘infodemic’ (term coined by The WHO describing the epidemy of COVID-19-related fake news) technology companies continue to introduce further reaching features _13 As mentioned in the previous report, WhatsApp rolled out a new feature to limit forwards to only one contact at a time. In just two weeks since the announcement, WhatsApp saw a 70% reduction in the number of highly forwarded messages. As the messages are encrypted, it’s impossible to know whether messages stopped from being forwarded consisted of fake news although, with WhatsApp’s dubious track record, it’s seen as positive sign. With spikes in misinformation and scams, platforms have been looking into way to increase transparency. Facebook and Instagram have launched a new feature which will automatically add prominent labels to posts from accounts that are popular within the United States but are run from another country. Google, on the other hand, will require all advertisers to confirm their legal identity. Both of this initiatives will be enforced in US first with broader roll-put happening over next few years. While it’s clear a lot is been done in the area of fighting fake news and tech platforms should be commended however the recent investigation of non-profit organisation Markup into Facebook’s ‘pseudoscience’ ad targeting shows how much is left to do. While the targeting category – containing 78 million people! - has been since removed, Facebook is facing a backlash and its efforts to prevent spread of fake news has been put into question.
  14. 14. AUDIOPLATFORMS Usage of audio platforms continues to level out this wave, although there are notable differences by demographics. While 18-34s are listening to many channels less this wave, the opposite is true of 45-54s and 65+ _14 Change in use of Audio Channels, Wave 4 Change in use of Audio Channels (Net using more Wave 4 VS. Wave 3) How would you describe your use of the following audio channels and platforms, compared to the time before COVID-19? 11% 6% 5% 5% 5% 4% 4% 3% 13% 13% 9% 10% 6% 5% 7% 5% 17% 27% 22% 16% 18% 12% 16% 11% 4% 6% 6% 3% 6% 3% 5% 3% 4% 6% 7% 3% 5% 3% 4% 3% 51% 42% 51% 63% 60% 73% 65% 75% Spotify BBC Sounds / BBC Radio Heart Radio Amazon Music Capital Radio Apple Music Absolute Radio LBC Never used this Using a lot less Using a bit less Using about the same amount Using a bit more Using a lot more Total 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ LBC 0% 1% -2% 0% 1% 1% 1% Heart Radio 0% -1% 5% -2% 3% -2% -1% Absolute Radio -1% 0% -6% 0% 2% 0% 0% Apple Music -1% -3% -3% -1% -2% 0% 0% Amazon Music -2% -9% -1% -1% -2% -3% 1% Spotify -2% -2% -5% -2% 2% -5% -1% Capital Radio -2% -9% -4% -7% 0% 1% 0% BBC Sounds / BBC Radio -3% -9% -6% -4% 2% -7% 0%
  15. 15. AUDIOPLATFORMS Audio is becoming multi-dimensional as music platforms and artists look for new ways to engage people _15 Travis Scott’s in-game Fortnite concert attracted over 12.3 million players logging in at once to experience it. It’s an increase of almost 1.5 million players compared to last year’s Marshmello’s concert. In a world without live concerts, Fortnite has yet again proved itself an interesting location to host shared experiences beyond pure gaming! Augmented reality can also offer musicians a chance to connect with their audiences under current circumstances. Real Estate launched the world’s first live, AR concert experience called ‘Quarantour’. Created in WebAR (hence not requiring any apps other than one’s browser) it allows fans to place a three- dimensional concert stage on the surface of their choosing. With the outbreak leading to spikes in feelings of stress and anxiety, more and more brands and tech platforms shift their focus to mental health. Spotify is hoping it can help us feel more relaxed by launching the Daily Wellness - a mix of music and podcasts geared towards self-care and wellness.
  16. 16. NEWSBRANDS Consumption of newsbrands remains fairly stable at a total level this wave. However, 18-34s are generally consuming less news brands this wave, while 45-64s are consuming more, especially broadsheet content _16 Change in use of newspaper brands, Wave 4 Change in use of newspaper brands (Net using more Wave 4 Vs. Wave 3) How would you describe your use of the following newspaper brands, compared to the time before COVID-19? 6% 5% 4% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 10% 7% 10% 6% 7% 5% 7% 4% 22% 18% 17% 16% 17% 14% 18% 15% 6% 4% 4% 4% 4% 7% 4% 3% 5% 6% 4% 6% 6% 16% 5% 3% 50% 60% 61% 64% 64% 54% 63% 71% The Daily Mail The Sun The Guardian The Telegraph The Mirror Metro The Times Huffington Post Never used this Using a lot less Using a bit less Using about the same amount Using a bit more Using a lot more TOTAL 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ The Times 1% -9% 3% 0% 4% 3% 1% The Sun 1% -2% -1% 2% 3% 3% -1% The Guardian 0% -5% -3% 0% 6% 2% 0% Metro 0% -6% 0% 0% 0% 2% 1% The Telegraph 0% 0% -3% -4% 3% 0% 1% The Daily Mail -1% -1% -4% 3% 2% -3% -3% The Mirror -1% -2% -6% -3% 1% 2% 1% Huffington Post -1% -1% -2% -3% 1% -1% -1%
  17. 17. TVCHANNELS While we are still watching considerably more TV than before the lock down, consumption of these key channels is dropping wave-on-wave, particularly for the 18-34s How would you describe your use of the following TV channels, compared to the time before COVID-19? 36% 16% 13% 12% 10% 9% 6% 30% 20% 24% 26% 16% 22% 16% 21% 24% 44% 48% 30% 53% 53% 3% 3% 4% 4% 3% 4% 6% 3% 3% 3% 2% 4% 3% 3% 8% 33% 12% 8% 37% 9% 15% Never used this Using a lot less Using a bit less Using about the same amount Using a bit more Using a lot more Change in use of TV Wave 4 Change in use of TV Channels (Net using more Wave 4 VS. Wave 3) Total 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Channel 4 -1% -8% -7% 4% 3% -3% 2% Channel 5 -1% -7% -1% -2% 1% -2% 2% BBC (other channels) -2% -3% -7% 5% -3% -3% 0% ITV -3% -10% -5% -2% 2% 1% -3% Sky (other channels) -3% -9% -4% -6% 0% -1% 1% BBC News -3% -4% -7% 4% -4% -4% -2% Sky News -5% -12% -7% -4% -3% -7% -2%
  18. 18. VOD&STREAMING We continue to watch more Netflix and YouTube vs. pre-COVID, but usage of VOD & streaming platforms is slowly dropping, largely driven by 18-24s – only Netflix sees wave-on-wave growth for this key age group How would you describe your use of the following video on demand and streaming platforms, compared to the time before COVID-19? 30% 22% 13% 12% 6% 5% 4% 3% 19% 27% 16% 24% 16% 13% 9% 5% 15% 33% 18% 35% 38% 38% 33% 10% 2% 3% 3% 4% 4% 4% 4% 3% 1% 2% 2% 4% 3% 3% 3% 2% 33% 12% 47% 20% 32% 36% 48% 76% Netflix YouTube Amazon Prime Video BBC iPlayer ITV Hub All 4 My5 Apple + Never used this Using a lot less Using a bit less Using about the same amount Using a bit more Using a lot more Change in use of video on demand & streaming platforms, Wave 4 Change in use of video on demand & streaming platforms (Net using more Wave 4 VS. Wave 3) Total 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Amazon Prime Video 1% -3% -1% -1% 5% -2% 3% All 4 0% -5% -3% 3% 4% 0% 0% Apple + -1% -5% -3% 1% 2% 0% 0% Netflix -1% 4% -9% 0% 1% -6% 5% My5 -1% -3% -2% -4% -1% 0% 0% BBC iPlayer -1% -9% -6% -3% 1% 2% 2% ITV Hub -2% -7% -6% 2% -1% 1% -1% YouTube -4% -8% -12% -4% -2% -4% 1%
  19. 19. VOD&STREAMING Netflix is winning the battle however the streaming wars are far from over! _19 Arguably Netflix is one of the biggest winners of last couple of months! Not only it reported growing its subscribers base by 16m in Q1 2020 (compared to planned 7m!) but also on 16th of April hit a major milestone - for the first time ever Netflix's share price had risen by just enough to make it more valuable than Disney. The fact that Disney was worth roughly 2x as much as Netflix just 3 months ago makes it even more impressive. Although Disney can also celebrate attracting over 50m subscribers to its Disney+ platform. YouTube’s Originals division is working on a slate of COVID-19-related shows which will range from educational content to dance performances and a social media mystery series. YouTube is eager to build on the success of it’s #withme initiative build around videos showing people performing everyday tasks or taking on crafts and activities that can be done at home. Tribeca Enterprises (responsible for organising annual Tribeca Film Festival) and YouTube have teamed up for a virtual festival called We Are One: A Global Film Festival. It will take place between 29th of May and 7th of June and showcase features, shorts, documentaries, music, comedy and interviews from festivals around the world (including the BFI London Film Festival).
  20. 20. Role of media and content
  21. 21. NEWSSOURCES The primary source of COVID-19 news has now stabilised, with TV continuing to lead and no significant changes wave-on-wave Primary / preferred source of news re: COVID-19 Significantly higher/lower than previous wave What is your primary / preferred source of news re: COVID-19? 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% Wave 1 Wave 2 Wave 3 Wave 4 Primary / preferred source of news re: COVID-19 Wave 4 Primary / preferred source of news re: COVID-19 Net gains Wave 4 vs. Wave 3 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ TV 34% 40% 53% 64% 68% 73% News websites 28% 26% 26% 21% 15% 14% Social media platforms 12% 16% 8% 4% 4% 1% Friends & Family 6% 5% 5% 3% 1% 1% Radio 6% 5% 2% 4% 6% 3% Newspapers 5% 3% 2% 1% 4% 7% Podcasts 3% 2% 2% 1% 1% 0% Magazines 2% 3% 3% 0% 0% 0% TOTAL 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Friends & Family 2% 4% -2% 2% 1% 0% 0% Social media platforms 1% -6% 6% 0% 0% 3% 0% Magazines 0% -1% 2% 1% 0% -1% 0% Podcasts 0% 1% -1% -1% 1% 0% -1% News websites 0% 4% -1% -3% 0% -3% 1% Newspapers 0% 1% -1% -1% 1% 1% 1% TV -1% -6% -3% 5% -2% 1% 0% Radio -1% -1% 0% 0% -1% -1% -2%
  22. 22. TRUSTWORTHYSOURCES Which of the following do you trust for factually correct information about COVID-19? After a slight improvement last wave, trust in Twitter has dropped significantly, driven by a decline for 18-24s; BBC continues to be the most trustworthy source of COVID-19 information Trustworthy sources of information re: COVID-19 Trustworthy sources of information re: COVID-19 Wave 4 Trustworthy sources of information re: COVID-19 Net gains Wave 4 vs. Wave 3 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% BBC SKY News The Guardian Daily Mail Friends & Family Facebook Other Twitter Wave 1 Wave 2 Wave 3 Wave 4 Significantly higher/lower than previous wave 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ BBC 64% 53% 63% 70% 70% 72% SKY News 29% 33% 32% 32% 31% 21% The Guardian 14% 19% 15% 12% 13% 8% Friends & Family 12% 12% 11% 11% 4% 9% Daily Mail 11% 10% 11% 7% 10% 12% Facebook 11% 13% 12% 6% 2% 1% Twitter 5% 8% 6% 3% 2% 1% TOTAL 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ The BBC -2% 4% -4% 1% -3% -4% -4% SKY News -1% 2% 4% -8% -4% 3% -2% The Guardian 1% -5% 3% -2% 2% 2% 1% Daily Mail -1% -3% -3% -1% 0% -2% -1% Friends & Family 0% -2% 0% 3% 2% -3% 0% Facebook -1% 0% -3% -1% 0% 0% 0% Twitter -2% -8% 1% -3% -4% 1% 0%
  23. 23. COMMUNICATION People are continuing to use more communication platforms vs. before COVID-19, but there is a slight decline in all of them wave-on-wave, mainly driven by 25-34s whose usage has dropped dramatically In terms of how you are keeping in touch with your friends and family, are you doing any more or less of the following, compared to the time before COVID-19? 31% 27% 25% 22% 31% 28% 28% 36% 25% 21% 30% 33% 2% 3% 3% 3% 2% 2% 1% 3%9% 19% 12% 2% Messaging (e.g. WhatsApp, Facebook Messenger) Video Calls (e.g. Facetime, Skype) Social Media platforms (e.g. Facebook, Instagram) Talking on the phone Never did this A lot less A bit less About the same A bit more A lot more Change in communication since COVID-19 Wave 4 Change in communication since COVID-19 (Net using more Wave 4 vs. Wave 3) Total 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Video Calls -1% 5% -8% 3% 2% -2% -1% Social Media platforms -1% -1% -9% -1% -1% 2% 3% Messaging -2% -1% -12% -4% 1% 1% 1% Talking on the phone -3% 1% -7% -3% 3% -11% -2%
  24. 24. COMMUNICATION With video calls remaining the main way of staying connected with the outside world, no wonder competition in the space is heating up! However are never- ending video chats good for us? _24 Facebook wants more of the video calling market, and has introduced a new tool called Messenger Rooms. The new feature allows up to 50 people to be in a group video call together with no time limit. Interestingly people will be able to join the chat without a Facebook account which feels like a U-turn as just 3 months ago Facebook quietly removed the ability to sign up for Messenger without a Facebook account. There is no denying Zoom had few tough weeks but company hopes its newest update – Zoom 5.0 – will silence some of the critics. New version of the app includes improved encryption (Zoom had previously claimed that it used end-to-end encryption, even though this was not true) and new privacy controls. While video conferencing apps are helping us stay employed and connected, ‘zoom fatigue’ is on the rise. As we increasingly use video chats for work but also family catch-ups, happy hours, fitness classes and lost go on, many of us say the constant screen time is causing them to be even more tired than normal.
  25. 25. CONTENTAREAS Consumption of gaming content has dropped wave-on-wave, driven by younger ages, potentially those who haven’t sustained a new interest in gaming during lockdown In terms of areas of interest, how would you describe your consumption of the following types of content, compared to the time before COVID-19? (this could be reading about, watching, or listening to this type of content) Change in consumption of areas of interest Wave 4 Change in consumption of areas of interest (Net consuming more Wave 4 vs. Wave 3) 34% 14% 13% 12% 9% 5% 4% 3% 34% 28% 23% 23% 14% 6% 17% 7% 23% 45% 42% 37% 27% 20% 45% 23% 3% 4% 6% 4% 4% 10% 5% 8% 3% 2% 7% 5% 5% 31% 5% 44% 3% 6% 9% 19% 42% 30% 23% 16% Never had any interest in this A lot less A bit less About the same A bit more A lot more Total 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Food 2% 0% -3% 8% 6% -1% 1% Home & Garden 1% 6% 0% 7% -4% -2% 0% Sport 0% -2% -2% 4% 1% 0% 0% Science & Technoloy 0% 2% -3% 3% -1% -1% 1% Travel -1% -1% -2% -1% 2% 0% -3% Entertainment -2% 1% -7% 0% 5% -6% -2% News -3% 0% -4% 0% -5% -4% -5% Gaming -3% -11% -9% -7% 3% 0% 0%
  26. 26. NEEDSTATES We continue to see a drop in needs, especially connection & information, potentially as people are now fully settled into their lockdown routine Thinking about the different roles that media can fulfil in your life, have any of the following needs become more or less important to you, compared to the time before COVID-19? Change in media needs Wave 4 Change in media needs (Net more important Wave 4 vs. Wave 3) 41% 24% 22% 21% 20% 20% 17% 12% 33% 33% 33% 31% 31% 29% 29% 29% 23% 37% 39% 40% 38% 39% 47% 48% 2% 3% 3% 4% 5% 5% 3% 6% 2% 2% 3% 3% 6% 8% 4% 5% A lot less important A bit less important About the same A bit more important A lot more important Total 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ For practical advice 0% -2% 3% 9% 2% -9% -5% Escapism -1% 8% -4% 0% 0% -6% 0% Inspiration -1% -2% -9% 9% 0% -8% 3% Unwind -2% 8% -9% 1% -3% -3% -1% Distraction -2% 0% -3% -1% -1% -1% -5% Comfort -3% -4% -5% 2% -6% 0% -4% Information -4% 2% -5% -3% -6% -4% -7% Connection -5% -4% -7% 2% -8% -8% -3%
  27. 27. Broader consumer behaviour
  28. 28. ACTIVITIES Participation in cooking, fitness and DIY are all continuing to grow wave on wave, particularly amongst 18-24s and 65+ In terms of activities, are you undertaking more or less of the following, compared to the time before COVID-19? Change in activities Wave 4 Change in activities since COVID-19 (Net using more Wave 4 vs. Wave 3) 21% 20% 19% 14% 12% 12% 11% 10% 37% 31% 31% 25% 24% 26% 19% 21% 36% 40% 40% 39% 37% 37% 28% 36% 4% 4% 6% 6% 5% 6% 4% 13% 1% 1% 2% 3% 3% 5% 3% 9% 2% 3% 1% 13% 19% 14% 34% 11% Cleaning Cooking Relaxing Reading books Doing puzzles, board games or crafts DIY Playing computer / video games Fitness Never did this A lot less A bit less About the same A bit more A lot more TOTAL 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ DIY 2% 6% -2% 2% 0% 0% 5% Cleaning 1% 1% -1% 0% -1% 0% 7% Fitness 0% 8% -6% -4% 1% -2% 5% Cooking 0% 3% -3% -7% 4% 3% 1% Doing puzzles, board games or crafts -1% 7% -9% -2% 1% 0% -1% Relaxing -2% 5% -7% -1% -7% -2% 0% Playing computer / video games -2% -6% -12% -4% 3% 8% -2% Reading books -4% -1% -14% -2% 4% -5% -2%
  29. 29. SELFIMPROVEMENT Thinking about how you are spending your time currently, compared to the time before COVID-19, which best applies to you for each of the following? Reading, learning new hobbies and taking up fitness continue to be the top new activities. 18-24s continue to sign up for educational courses, while 45-54s are reading more, taking up new forms of fitness and learning new hobbies New hobbies / activities undertaken Wave 4 Change in New hobbies / activities (Net already started / definitely intend to more Wave 4 vs. Wave 3) 22% 12% 12% 8% 7% 6% 5% 4% 19% 12% 11% 10% 8% 7% 7% 5% 32% 33% 28% 29% 23% 20% 19% 15% 13% 21% 22% 27% 23% 20% 24% 22% 9% 19% 24% 24% 37% 44% 43% 51% Read more Learn a new hobby e.g. gardening, cooking, knitting Take up a new form of fitness Learn a new skill (e.g. arts, crafts, musical instrument) Take a short educational course Take part in training through my existing workplace Learn a new language Sign up for a longer educational course e.g. undergraduate, postgraduate or MBA I’ve already started doing this I definitely intend to do this I might do this I probably won’t do this I definitely won’t do this I was doing this before COVID-19 TOTAL 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Learn a new hobby e.g. gardening, cooking, knitting 1% 0% -1% 3% 6% -1% 1% Take part in training through my existing workplace 1% 0% -2% 5% 1% 2% 0% Take a short educational course 1% 8% -4% -1% 1% 3% -1% Learn a new skill (e.g. arts, crafts, musical instrument) 0% 3% -4% 2% 3% -3% 1% Take up a new form of fitness 0% -3% 0% -3% 7% -5% 2% Read more 0% -2% -3% 2% 6% -5% 0% Sign up for a longer educational course e.g. undergraduate, postgraduate or MBA -1% -10% -2% -2% 2% 0% 0% Learn a new language -2% -8% -3% -7% -3% 0% 3%
  30. 30. LEISURESPENDING Spending on entertainment and digital purchases leads the way vs. pre COVID-19, with 18-24s actively buying more takeaways in the last fortnight. An increase in gym / fitness club memberships is driven by under 45s – likely to be online subscriptions Again, thinking about your spending habits, which of the following apply to you in terms of how your habits may have changed, compared to the time before COVID-19? Change in leisure spending Wave 4 7% 4% 4% 4% 4% 3% 3% 3% 15% 12% 12% 7% 8% 7% 5% 5% 43% 23% 25% 21% 20% 11% 12% 10% 4% 13% 6% 6% 5% 4% 5% 3% 3% 28% 6% 8% 6% 4% 16% 4% 28% 20% 46% 54% 57% 70% 60% 75% Entertainment subscription services e.g. Netflix Takeaway / food for delivery Digital purchases of films e.g. Sky store, Amazon Prime Limited passes for subscription service e.g. Now TV Entertainment / Cinema pass Education / self- improvement / learning new skills Virtual / online gym / fitness classes Gym / fitness club memberships Online dating apps / websites Never spend on this Spending a lot less on this Spending a bit less on this Spending about the same as before Spending a bit more on this Spending a lot more on this Change in leisure spending (Net spending more Wave 4 vs. Wave 3) TOTAL 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Gym / fitness club memberships 2% 4% 3% 4% 0% 1% 0% Entertainment subscription services e.g. Netflix 0% 4% -7% 0% 4% -1% 2% Education / self-improvement / learning new skills 0% 0% -3% 0% -3% 3% 1% Online dating apps / websites 0% -1% 0% -1% 1% -1% 0% Virtual / online gym / fitness classes 0% -3% -1% 2% 0% -2% 1% Digital purchases of films e.g. Sky store, Amazon Prime -2% -4% -8% -2% 0% 2% 1% Takeaway / food for delivery -2% 3% -7% -7% -1% 2% 1% Limited passes for subscription service e.g. Now TV Entertainment / Cinema pass -2% -3% -7% -6% 1% 1% 0%
  31. 31. BIGTICKETPURCHASEINTENTIONS Now, we’d like you to think about bigger purchases or decisions. Which currently best applies to you in terms of how your intentions may have changed, compared to the time before COVID-19? Booking a holiday continues to be the most delayed purchase, becoming even more likely among 18-24s in the last fortnight. People are also easing off other big purchases, such as buying a new mobile phone handset Change in big purchase intentions Wave 4 Change in big purchase intentions (Net Definitely / Probably will delay Wave 4 vs. Wave 3) 41% 17% 14% 13% 13% 8% 8% 7% 16% 13% 17% 20% 9% 14% 10% 12% 8% 8% 12% 21% 7% 15% 9% 17% 6% 4% 5% 13% 3% 11% 6% 13% 29% 58% 52% 33% 68% 51% 67% 51% Booking a holiday Buying a car Buying a new mobile phone handset Making home improvements Buying or selling a property (house or flat) Switching utility providers (gas/ electric, internet, mobile phone etc.) Investing in Further Education (Undergraduate degree, Master, other formal qualification) Taking out a new insurance policy / switching provider Definitely will delay doing this Might delay doing this Probably won’t delay doing this Definitely won’t delay doing this Had no intention of doing this Total 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Buying a new mobile phone handset 3% 6% -1% 4% 4% 4% 1% Buying or selling a property (house or flat) 0% -3% -2% -3% 1% 5% 3% Investing in Further Education 0% -3% -2% 0% -1% 0% 2% Booking a holiday -1% 6% -3% 2% 1% 0% -6% Switching utility providers -1% 1% -7% -1% 0% -2% 2% Taking out a new insurance policy / switching provider -2% -6% -2% 1% -1% -1% -2% Making home improvements -2% -3% -5% -3% 4% 1% -4% Buying a car -3% -6% -2% -5% -2% 0% -1%
  32. 32. SHOPPING Online shopping dominates and continues to rise, with a surge for 18-24s in the last fortnight. In store shopping also increases to a lesser degree for the same age group Thinking about your shopping habits now… Overall, are you spending any more or less on shopping via the following methods, compared to the time before COVID-19? 14% 5% 27% 13% 35% 25% 7% 16% 10% 38% 6% 2% Online shopping In-store shopping Never did this Spending a lot less Spending a bit less No change Spending a bit more Spending a lot more Change in shopping habits Wave 4 Change in shopping habits (Net spending more Wave 4 vs. Wave 3) TOTAL 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Online shopping 1% 10% -4% -3% 0% 2% 4% In-store shopping -1% 2% -3% 1% 0% -1% -1%
  33. 33. BRICKS&MORTARSHOPPING In store shopping is largely being propped up by grocery and is the only category actively increasing across the last fortnight (driven by all ages bar 65+) And now, thinking about these specific categories, which of the following apply to you in terms of how your IN-STORE shopping habits may have changed, compared to the time before COVID-19? Change in in-store shopping habits Wave 4 Change to in-store shopping habits (Net spending more Wave 4 vs. Wave 3) 10% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 2% 25% 7% 6% 5% 5% 7% 7% 5% 37% 37% 28% 38% 30% 37% 42% 37% 12% 9% 5% 8% 11% 7% 13% 9% 15% 27% 18% 34% 46% 26% 27% 37% 1% 17% 40% 12% 5% 20% 8% 10% Food and drink Leisure Goods (Books, board games and stationery) Computer / video games Electrical products (including mobiles, tablets, photography equipment, TV and audio goods, etc) Clothing, accessories and footwear (incl. Sportswear) Leisure Goods (DVDs, film, TV series, music) Health and beauty Homewares and furniture Never buy in store in this category Spending a lot less in store Spending a bit less in store No change Spending a bit more in store Spending a lot more in store Total 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Food and drink 6% 1% 9% 11% 8% 10% 0% Health and beauty 0% -4% 4% 0% -2% 2% 0% Clothing, accessories and footwear (incl. Sportswear) 0% -2% 1% 0% -1% -1% -1% Electrical products 0% -5% 2% -1% -2% 0% 0% Leisure Goods (Books, board games and stationery) -1% -1% -5% 0% 0% -2% 1% Computer / video games -1% -2% -4% -1% 2% -1% 1% Homewares and furniture -1% -3% 1% -1% -1% -1% -1% Leisure Goods (DVDs, film, TV series, music) -1% -7% -2% -1% 1% -1% 0%
  34. 34. COMMUNICATION Solutions supermarkets are adopting to face the new reality of in-store shopping could offer a peek into future of the whole retail sector _34 For years, retailers have experimented with scan-and-go checkout-free retail (the practice of customers using their mobile phones to scan items, bag these items themselves, pay electronically, and then just walk out the door) but it looks like coronavirus fears could accelerate its roll- out. While Co-op, Marks & Spencer, Sainsbury’s and Tesco have introduced scan-pay-go in a small number of stores, Asda announced expanding the solution to all its stores. Time will tell whether other retail sectors will also embrace scan-pay-go solutions. Brands are looking at the ways how to support those who are not able to visit supermarkets to do their grocery shopping. Sainsbury’s, M&S, Asda and Aldi all have launched new voucher schemes to make it easier for volunteers to buy food on behalf of someone else. Starling Bank went even further and launched The Connected Card which can be given to a friend, family member or volunteer shopper. Tesco is providing its workforce with access to free digital mental health wellness tools in an effort to mitigate stressful working conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic. Employees will have access to tools like Headspace and SilverCloud for the next 12 months.
  35. 35. E.COMMERCE A fortnightly increase in online shopping for 18-24s is driven by clothing and health products. Elsewhere there are signs 65+ are adapting well to a digital means of shopping, with increases across all categories And again, thinking about these specific categories, which of the following apply to you in terms of how your ONLINE shopping habits may have changed, compared to the time before COVID-19? compared to the time before COVID-19? Change in online shopping habits Wave 4 Change to online shopping habits (Net spending more Wave 4 vs. Wave 3) 12% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 3% 3% 18% 8% 13% 13% 14% 13% 10% 9% 32% 33% 42% 37% 41% 40% 44% 41% 7% 5% 8% 11% 8% 7% 7% 7% 7% 12% 14% 23% 14% 16% 22% 20% 24% 38% 18% 12% 18% 21% 14% 19% Food and drink Computer / Video Games Leisure Goods (books, board games and stationery) Clothing, accessories and footwear (incl. Sportswear) Health and beauty Leisure Goods (DVDs, film, TV series, music) Electrical products (including mobiles, tablets, photography equipment, TV and audio goods, etc) Homewares and furniture Never buy online in this category Spending a lot less online Spending a bit less online No change Spending a bit more online Spending a lot more online TOTAL 18-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65+ Clothing, accessories and footwear (incl. Sportswear) 2% 6% -1% 0% 0% 2% 5% Homewares and furniture 1% -3% 5% -3% 1% 0% 3% Health and beauty 1% 6% -3% -2% 1% -2% 4% Food and drink 0% -5% 3% 2% 1% 0% 0% Leisure Goods (books, board games and stationery) 0% 2% -1% -2% -1% 0% 4% Electrical products (including mobiles, tablets, photography equipment, TV and audio goods, etc) 0% -7% 2% 0% -1% 2% 3% Leisure Goods (DVDs, film, TV series, music) 0% 0% -4% -3% 0% 0% 6% Computer / Video Games -1% -12% -4% -1% 4% 1% 1%
  36. 36. 36 In summary Media consumption has stabilised with some slight declines in live TV and newsbrands, while streaming services continue to see increases. Established behaviours are starting to show the strain, with people anticipating a relaxing of measures and less inclination to self isolate. Younger people are feeling the effects more strongly than any other age group. They are the most likely to feel lonely and overwhelmed, while at the same time doing more new things (DIY, shopping, fitness).
  37. 37. Thank you

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UK media consumption has continued to rise in the last two weeks, with huge gains across live TV, video, social media, and video streaming, according to the latest Havas Media Group COVID-19 Media Behaviours Report. The fourth iteration of Havas Media Group’s COVID-19 Media Behaviours Report, a research study into consumer behavior and media consumption based on a survey of 1,487 UK respondents, shows that 64% of people claim to be watching more live TV than they did prior to the coronavirus outbreak (a net increase of 15% versus the first set of findings two weeks ago).

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