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Digital Innovation Academy Presentation Slides

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The presentations of speakers at Digital Innovation Academy on June 6, 2018.

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Digital Innovation Academy Presentation Slides

  1. 1. Digital Innovation Academy Harvard Public Affairs & Communications June 6, 2018
  2. 2. 2 In higher ed… summertime is strategytime ● Assess what worked / didn’t over the past year ● Think creatively / differently about our work ● Explore and experiment with new workflows, ideas, and innovations ● Involve colleagues in your assessment and strategic planning process
  3. 3. 3 Thinking differently about digital ● Today’s event transcends specific digital topics ● Explore practical applications of creative approaches, and look to the future of digital Tactical Exploratory
  4. 4. 4 Practical, tactical session goals ● Create a framework to start small, think big, and create organization change ● Generate and implement great ideas ● Enhance your digital storytelling in the areas of social video, podcasting, email marketing design, analytics, and 360° film / photography
  5. 5. 5 Coffee talk networking session Engage with Harvard experts, collaborate with your University colleagues, share updates and ideas, and let the strategizing begin
  6. 6. 6 Future, exploratory session goals ● Understand the digital ecosystem and the future of the internet and social media ● Gain insight on how younger generations interact with the web and ideas for more youth engagement ● Explore the skills, priorities, and technologies that will be most important for digital communications professionals in the future
  7. 7. 7 Our speakers are kind of a big deal. Enjoy and engage with them in Q&A!
  8. 8. Thank you Harvard Public Affairs & Communications
  9. 9. Small bets, big payoffs How to create change through experimentation @mikepetroff | Harvard University
  10. 10. hello! I’m Mike Petroff Director of Content Strategy, Harvard University @mikepetroff 2
  11. 11. 3 I love conferences. I also hate returning to work after conferences.
  12. 12. 4 An Agile approach to content Richard Prowse Head of Digital, University of Bath
  13. 13. 5 I love it! Thanks! Cheers! Good luck!
  14. 14. Meanwhile, back at Harvard. 6
  15. 15. 7 We wear many hats as content strategists.
  16. 16. The Coach Powers: ● Governance models ● CMS trainings ● How-to guides 8
  17. 17. The coach. 9
  18. 18. The Organizer Powers: ● Content audits ● Trello boards ● Structured data 10
  19. 19. The organizer. 11
  20. 20. The Wordsmith Powers: ● Brand voice ● Grammar ● Copy editing 12
  21. 21. The wordsmith. 13
  22. 22. The Influencer Powers: ● Persuasion ● Negotiation ● Community-building 14
  23. 23. The influencer. 15
  24. 24. 16 Organizations need influencers. Why is it important to embrace and encourage change?
  25. 25. 1. Psychological safety: the belief that one will not be punished or humiliated for speaking up with ideas 2. Cognitive diversity: a blend of different problem- solving behaviors, like collaboration, identifying problems, applying information, breaking rules, and inventing new approaches 17
  26. 26. 18 More: ● Curious ● Inquiring ● Experimental ● Nurturing Less: ● Hierarchical ● Directive ● Controlling ● Conforming
  27. 27. Happiness at work 19
  28. 28. Small wins have a cumulative impact. 20
  29. 29. Research Study 26 project teams 7 companies 238 individuals 21 “Our goal was to discover the states of inner work life and the workday events that correlated with the highest levels of creative output.”
  30. 30. 22 “Of all the things that can boost inner work life, the most important is making progress in meaningful work.”
  31. 31. 23 Change Structure
  32. 32. 24 Real examples of small bets and big payoffs.
  33. 33. St. Lawrence University Meg Bernier Keniston Associate Director of Marketing Goal: Working with students, bring social media into ‘real life’ experiences on campus. 25
  34. 34. Instagram thank you notes 26 Twitter hockey jerseys
  35. 35. “ Now, I do presentations discussing how students can use their digital presence in positive ways. Career Services also now has programming focused on digital identities. 27
  36. 36. Cornell University Ashley Budd Director of Digital Marketing Goal: Encourage alumni donations for Giving Day. 28
  37. 37. Giving Day email campaigns 29 ● Optimistic but not sappy ● Smart but not stodgy ● Fun but not childish ● Clever but not silly ● Informal but not sloppy ● Helpful but not overbearing
  38. 38. “ We’ve learned what resonates with students and have set them up to be more comfortable with giving to the university. 30
  39. 39. University of Florida Todd Sanders Director of Digital Communications and Social Media Goal: Engage with their community on social media for Festivus. 31
  40. 40. University of Florida’s Facebook Page 32
  41. 41. Top Comments 33
  42. 42. “ I’m happy to report that since the Festivus post, @UFTAPS has joined Twitter. It’s been four years of begging the parking folks to join social for this to happen. 34
  43. 43. University of Cambridge Barney Brown Head of Digital Communications Goal: Working more closely with students to create positive stories. 35
  44. 44. Instagram Takeover 36
  45. 45. Instagram Takeover 37
  46. 46. “ By trusting our students and amplifying their (unedited) voices through our central channels we’ve now got a great relationship with our vloggers. 38
  47. 47. We experiment at Harvard, too. Some work out. Some don’t. But we’re always learning.
  48. 48. Audience surveys 40
  49. 49. Social media video production 41
  50. 50. A/B tests 42 Daily Gazette email newsletter Harvard.edu homepage
  51. 51. Instagram #HarvardUnwind series 43
  52. 52. Giphy stickers for Commencement 44
  53. 53. The dreaded “Monthly Report” spreadsheet 45
  54. 54. “ If every single one of your projects succeeded, it would mean you were coasting. Failing once in a while is a good sign. -Perry Hewitt 46
  55. 55. Scoop: Analytics dashboard and reports 47 2016/2017
  56. 56. Scoop: Analytics dashboard and reports 48 2017-2018
  57. 57. Experimentation takes time. Ongoing pilots: ● Audience growth efforts ● Paid campaigns on social ● 24-hour and live content ● Agile workflows and Trello ● Redesigns (big and small) All while managing: ● Harvard.edu content ● Harvard Gazette Wordpress ● @Harvard social posts ● Email support ● Daily/weekly analytics reports ● Meetings ● Academy trainings ● Campaigns ● And lots more... 49
  58. 58. Credit: Graziella Jackson, Echo&Co 50 Based on an assumed 1,782 working hours in a year (2,080 minus federal holidays, vacation, sick time, etc.) Type of idea % of your budget % of your time “Bread and butter” (low risk, low scope daily efforts) 70% 50% (891 hours per year, 20 hours per week f/t) “Build and boost” (replicating ideas that have proven their results; often reach and conversion drives with a clear beginning, middle, end) 20% 25% (445.5 hours per year, 10 hours per week f/t) “Breakthroughs” (high risk, high scope, high value new ideas, taken from pilot to replication) 10% 25% (445.5 hours per year, 10 hours per week f/t)
  59. 59. 51 Frameworks for experimentation
  60. 60. Process.
  61. 61. Design Thinking 53
  62. 62. Agile Methodology 54
  63. 63. 55 Reporting
  64. 64. 56 4-slide report What was our goal? What did we do? How did it do? What will this change for us?
  65. 65. People.
  66. 66. Negotiation 58
  67. 67. Culture, Time, and Resources 59 “If there’s an idea that someone’s passionate about, we put in a system to make it easy and fast and cheap for them to run an experiment. Strip it down to what leap-of-faith assumption you want to prove, and how you can run an experiment next week or next month, at virtually no resources, to test that idea.” -Scott Cook, co-founder of Intuit
  68. 68. Culture, Time, and Resources 60 “If there’s an idea that someone’s passionate about, we put in a system to make it easy and fast and cheap for them to run an experiment. Strip it down to what leap-of-faith assumption you want to prove, and how you can run an experiment next week or next month, at virtually no resources, to test that idea.” -Scott Cook, co-founder of Intuit
  69. 69. Culture, Time, and Resources 61 “If there’s an idea that someone’s passionate about, we put in a system to make it easy and fast and cheap for them to run an experiment. Strip it down to what leap-of-faith assumption you want to prove, and how you can run an experiment next week or next month, at virtually no resources, to test that idea.” -Scott Cook, co-founder of Intuit
  70. 70. Culture, Time, and Resources 62 “If there’s an idea that someone’s passionate about, we put in a system to make it easy and fast and cheap for them to run an experiment. Strip it down to what leap-of-faith assumption you want to prove, and how you can run an experiment next week or next month, at virtually no resources, to test that idea.” -Scott Cook, co-founder of Intuit
  71. 71. Culture, Time, and Resources 63 “If there’s an idea that someone’s passionate about, we put in a system to make it easy and fast and cheap for them to run an experiment. Strip it down to what leap-of-faith assumption you want to prove, and how you can run an experiment next week or next month, at virtually no resources, to test that idea.” -Scott Cook, co-founder of Intuit
  72. 72. 64©Mary Shapiro, Simmons School of Management, Boston, MA
  73. 73. 65
  74. 74. Experimentation requires a focus on process and people.
  75. 75. 67 Find your inner influencer. Create change through experimentation.
  76. 76. Find ways to make progress on meaningful work. 68
  77. 77. 69 Thank you! @mikepetroff linkedin.com/in/mikepetroff
  78. 78. Staying sharp: How to create and implement great ideas Harvard Digital Innovation Academy June 6, 2018
  79. 79. 2 Graziella Jackson, Echo&Co ● Human-centered designer and creative principal ● Has worked with social sector organizations on digital innovation for 15 years ● Studied the intersection of technology and civic life at Georgetown University ● Learned innovation from my mom, who was a master at creating and implementing new ideas Email: graziella@echo.co LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/ graziellajackson Twitter: @graziasays
  80. 80. What we’ll explore ● What makes one idea better than another? ● How can you balance everyday and breakthrough ideas? ● How can you preserve an original idea through implementation? ● Why do the best ideas often remain undiscovered? 3
  81. 81. What makes one idea better than another? (idea valuation) 4
  82. 82. Let’s find out! Is the idea / activity useful? if no Stop! You could risk wasting valuable resources on something that does not return results. Is the idea / activity uncommon or rare? Stop! You could be spending valuable resources on something someone else is already pursuing. Is the idea / activity costly to replicate? Caution! Someone else could easily copy or replicate your idea (or even do it better). Before proceeding, decide if it is worth the investment. Is the idea / activity designed for lasting value? Caution! The activity may be valuable in the short term, but it may not have long-term value. Before proceeding, decide if it is worth the investment for only a short-term gain. if yes Congrats! You have an idea that is very likely worth the investment! Test it out with a pilot program. if yes if yes if yes if no if no if no 5
  83. 83. A great idea... ● Addresses a specific challenge ● Adds value for the organization ● Adds value for the end-consumer 6 Read: Fifteen experts define innovation https://www.ideatovalue.com/inno/nickskillicorn/2016/03/innov ation-15-experts-share-innovation-definition/ Think: How do you define innovation? What do you think separates an okay or good idea from a great idea?
  84. 84. Great ideas come from ... ● The right people, ● In the right setting, ● With clear guidelines, ● And useful materials, ● Solving a specific challenge, ● Toward clear outcomes, ● Through a series of well-designed activities. 7 Think workshop, not meeting.
  85. 85. Great ideas come from ... 8 ● Change your physical setting. ● Use timers to add pressure. ● Use sound and music to encourage movement. ● Start by exploring something other than your idea (opposites, what ifs, impossible scenarios, combinations, total guesses, etc). Read: Thinkertoys: A Handbook of creative thinking techniques https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004CFAWU2/ref=dp-kindle- redirect?_encoding=UTF8&btkr=1 * Warning! Product placement. Disrupting usual ways of thinking and doing.
  86. 86. How can you balance everyday ideas and breakthrough ideas? (idea management) 9
  87. 87. Breakthroughs need structure and space 10 Based on an assumed 1,782 working hours in a year (2,080 minus federal holidays, vacation, sick time, etc.) Type of idea % of your budget % of your time “Bread and butter” (low risk, low scope daily efforts) 70% 50% (891 hours per year, 20 hours per week f/t) “Build and boost” (replicating ideas that have proven their results; often reach and conversion drives with a clear beginning, middle, end) 20% 25% (445.5 hours per year, 10 hours per week f/t) “Breakthroughs” (high risk, high scope, high value new ideas, taken from pilot to replication) 10% 25% (445.5 hours per year, 10 hours per week f/t) Listen: Freakonomics: Here’s why your projects are always late http://freakonomics.com/podcast/project-management
  88. 88. Cost can be a great driver of change 11 Operating hourly rate x Hours to production ÷ Number of impressions (or conversions) = Cost per impression (or conversions) Your operating expenses divided by the number of workable hours in the year — typically 1,782 The number of hours spent on this activity across all team members who supported it. The number of people who viewed the content or activity. The number of people who converted off the content or activity. The estimated cost of that activity per yield. Enables you to ask: How else could we be spending this money!? $120 / hour x 30 ÷ 10 = $360 per impression
  89. 89. Build a roadmap — step 1: capture 12
  90. 90. Build a roadmap — step 2: organize 13
  91. 91. Build a roadmap — step 3: validate 14 Is the idea / activity useful? if no Stop! You could risk wasting valuable resources on something that does not return results. Is the idea / activity uncommon or rare? Stop! You could be spending valuable resources on something someone else is already pursuing. Is the idea / activity costly to replicate? Caution! Someone else could easily copy or replicate your idea (or even do it better). Before proceeding, decide if it is worth the investment. Is the idea / activity designed for lasting value? Caution! The activity may be valuable in the short term, but it may not have long-term value. Before proceeding, decide if it is worth the investment for only a short-term gain. if yes Congrats! You have an idea that is very likely worth the investment! Test it out with a pilot program. if yes if yes if yes if no if no if no
  92. 92. Build a roadmap — step 4: plan 15* This will be the only spreadsheet shown in this presentation
  93. 93. Build a roadmap — step 5: implement 16 Read: The 18 best startup books I have read this year https://medium.com/swlh/the-18-best-startup-business-books- i-have-read-this-year-cbbab1b6c53e Why the lean startup changes everything https://hbr.org/2013/05/why-the-lean-start-up-changes- everything
  94. 94. How can you preserve an original idea through implementation? (idea implementation) 17
  95. 95. 18 good knowledge base.
  96. 96. Build a knowledge and practice base 19 ● Replicate your pilot, ● Refine each attempt, ● After several successful test runs, ● Create processes to mature the pilot, ● And make it available at scale. Visit MobLab https://mobilisationlab.org/ Ten imperatives to sustain good innovation https://www.huffingtonpost.com/robert-f-brands/10- imperatives-to-sustain_b_5936398.html Read:
  97. 97. Brave the elements ... 20
  98. 98. Plan the work before doing the work 21
  99. 99. Why do the best ideas often remain undiscovered? (idea generation) 22
  100. 100. We skip the inspiration phase Read: Divergent thinking and the innovation funnel https://www.ideou.com/blogs/inspiration/brendan-boyle-on- divergent-thinking-and-the-innovation-funnel 23
  101. 101. We “brainstorm” too much ● It over-emphasizes the “genius method” ● It attempts to add and subtract at the same time ● It favors certain learning styles over others ● It makes people dread meetings ● Over time, it can create a stagnant idea culture 24 Read: Your team is brainstorming all wrong https://hbr.org/2017/05/your-team-is-brainstorming-all-wrong Learning styles: Why one-size fits all does not work https://ilslearningcorner.com/blog/2016/02/18/2016-02- learning-styles-one-size-fits-all-doesnt-work
  102. 102. We forget to ask the user A 5-step process for conducting user research https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2013/09/5-step-process-conducting- user-research 25 Read:
  103. 103. We have meetings instead of fun Replace meetings* with: ● Gamestorming ● Role playing and empathy mapping ● Creative improv * It’s time to hone those teaching and facilitation skills! 26 Gamestorming http://gamestorming.com Try: Five improv exercises every designer should know https://www.ideo.com/blog/5-improv-exercises-every- designer-should-know
  104. 104. We don’t “pitch” a better alternative Read: What makes a good pitch? http://training.npr.org/audio/what-makes-a-good-pitch-npr- editors-weigh-in How to pitch an idea to your boss and get a yes https://www.themuse.com/advice/how-to-pitch-a-big-idea-to- your-boss-and-get-a-yes Watch: Pixar series on pitching and feedback https://www.khanacademy.org/partner- content/pixar/storytelling/storyboard-your-film/v/pitching1 Your pitch needs to: ● Tell a compelling story ● Demonstrate your expertise ● Preview your research ● Be short ● Be surprising 27
  105. 105. Let’s practice! 28 I have an idea for ______________________. Based on initial research, I think if we ___________________, then we will ____________________ for __________________. This is important because ___________________. I’d like to try __________________, which will require ______________________. As we test and replicate it, we will measure ___________________, to determine if it is successful and should be repeated at scale. [a solution] [an action] [a result] [a resource] [a metric] [an audience] [an action] [a need]
  106. 106. Go forth and ideate! 29
  107. 107. Speed rounds How to enhance your digital storytelling
  108. 108. How to create social videos without a video team
  109. 109. Asia Bradlee Digital Communications Coordinator, Harvard Public Affairs & Communications
  110. 110. What is WAVE? ● Online video maker for quick video creation. ● Customize fonts and colors to match your brand. ● Preloaded photos, videos, and music with option to upload your own. ● Videos can be downloaded in any format— square for social, 16:9 for YouTube, etc.
  111. 111. What are the benefits of WAVE? ● Visualize data in a more compelling way; not text heavy. ● Weave together data from different components to create a story. ● Complement for social campaigns. ● Repurpose physical collateral. ● Time efficient. a. 1-2 days
  112. 112. Month in Review
  113. 113. Ecosystem of Innovation
  114. 114. In Conclusion ● WAVE videos allow us to make data visually interesting, increase access to our content, and give a fun/creative voice to our brand. ● This technology help us tell our stories in a time-efficient manner and without the need for a large video team.
  115. 115. How to build a podcast from the ground up
  116. 116. Curt Nickisch Senior Editor, Harvard Business Review
  117. 117. Case In Point
  118. 118. Why Are You Doing It?
  119. 119. Who’s It For?
  120. 120. What’s The Format?
  121. 121. How Long Should It Be?
  122. 122. Who’s Gonna Do It?
  123. 123. How Will People Find It?
  124. 124. How to email: Design thinking for e-newsletters
  125. 125. Ben S Wallace Senior Digital Designer, Harvard T.H Chan School of Public Health
  126. 126. “ Design thinking is the essential ability to combine empathy, creativity, and rationality to meet user needs. (No one really knows who said this) (Design thinking isn’t just for designers)
  127. 127. Place your screenshot here Modern, but more importantly, easier to understand The final product
  128. 128. How to take disparate data sources & build your own analytics dashboard
  129. 129. Helen Lewis Systems Analytics Lead, Harvard Alumni Affairs & Development
  130. 130. 1) Put data (from anywhere) into Google Sheets Or choose a data source, like Google Analytics or YouTube! Gather data from.. -Certain Events -Outlook -Excel Files -Salesforce Marketing Cloud -literally anywhere!
  131. 131. 2) Connect data source(s) & a build dashboard
  132. 132. 3) Get creative to tell the story!
  133. 133. 4) Go historical!
  134. 134. Let’s recap! Gather Put data from any data source(s) into Google Sheets and connect... Connect Or use a connected data source, such as Google Analytics or YouTube Design Build (and customize) your Dashboard Tutorial https://www.distilled.net/reso urces/google-data-studio-the- beginners-tutorial/#Chapter17 https://bit.ly/2kOgT1D Share it!
  135. 135. How to film & photograph in 360° with a limited budget
  136. 136. KJ Wang Multimedia Producer and Editor, Harvard Public Affairs & Communications
  137. 137. What’s what VR Artificial. Computer-generated environment using sight and sound to mimic a real one. Expensive. Always. AR Real + artificial. A live view of a real- world environment, supplemented by computer-generated content. Expensive. Usually. 360 Real. Video, or photo, that is spherical. Shot with omnidirectional cameras, or multiple cameras. Affordable.
  138. 138. “Back in my day...” Involved a lot of stitching, processing rendering, head-scratching, and exporting. Each of six cameras would record independently, with images wrapped spherically in post.
  139. 139. You’re welcome You won’t have to do any of that. You can now just stick it on a tripod and press a button.
  140. 140. Journalistic Capture a moment and let the viewer immerse themselves in it. Telling Stories Filmic Add a narrative, whether that involves VO, text, music, visual cues to guide the viewer and tell your story. So you CAN do 360, but SHOULD you? Use 360 to best tell a story, rather than for the novelty of it.
  141. 141. Our work Some examples of the type of assets we’ve created using 360 footage □ Immersive scenes (video + photo) □ Narrative 360 films with VO □ 360 infographics (image + fact boxes) □ Tiny planet (video + photo, using manipulated 360 footage) □ 360 timelapse (photo + video)
  142. 142. Process Planning Filming Editing
  143. 143. Camera recs GoPro Fusion □ $700 □ Excellent quality on video and stills □ Higher skill level required □ More time Ricoh Theta V □ $400 □ Great still image quality □ Reasonable video quality □ Easy, quick, novice-level operation
  144. 144. Tips □ Select spaces that are visual interesting in every direction– left, right, up and down. □ Use a tripod (almost always). □ Try planting audio cues to entice the viewer to look around and explore. □ Remember the experience is quite different when viewing on a headset vs. desktop vs. mobile. □ Both Facebook and YouTube have 360 players. Vimeo too. □ Be creative. Experiment! This is still relatively new in the mainstream.
  145. 145. Speed rounds Thanks!
  146. 146. The Digital Ecosystem Where we are, where we’re headed, and what we could be doing better Dipayan Ghosh June 6, 2018 Digital Innovation Academy Harvard University
  147. 147. The Infrastructure to Spread Disinformation & The Demand for that Disinformation
  148. 148. Why discuss social media and news in the first place?
  149. 149. Infrastructure
  150. 150. Traditional advertising (e.g., Chanel) (e.g., NYT)
  151. 151. The digital advertising ecosystem
  152. 152. 2011
  153. 153. Facebook monthly active users 2008-2017
  154. 154. Facebook annual revenues 2007-2017
  155. 155. Revenue growth from ad tech – and this was true across the industry.
  156. 156. Facebook’s new ad tech (2011-2013) • Power Editor – June 2011 • Ads in the News Feed – January 2012 • Custom Audiences – September 2012 • Lookalike Audiences – March 2013 • Partner Categories – April 2013
  157. 157. Power Editor
  158. 158. Custom Audiences Source: Stream SEO
  159. 159. Lookalike Audiences Source: Hitwise
  160. 160. Partner Categories
  161. 161. Ads in the News Feed Source: Buffer Social
  162. 162. The commercial interests of disinformation actors and internet platforms are – in some ways – aligned.
  163. 163. Underlying this entire infrastructure is highly sensitive personal data.
  164. 164. Behavior tracking (location data)
  165. 165. Behavior tracking (location data)
  166. 166. The Cambridge-Facebook data was especially sensitive because it included Facebook user ids.
  167. 167. ‘Weak’ AI Weak AI has the capacity to understand a narrow environment, typically with a degree of memory and computational power many orders of magnitude higher than average human intelligence.
  168. 168. Forthcoming applications of AI in digital advertising?
  169. 169. Automated content creation using AI Source: PSFK
  170. 170. Contingency-based ad targeting
  171. 171. How do we fix this?
  172. 172. As digital professionals it’s about… • Remaining vigilant about your organization’s digital image • Being circumspect while absorbing new content • Applying intuition and a calm, questioning eye • Knowing where to issue a complaint • Creating relevant and genuine content for your online audiences
  173. 173. Policy Agenda • Data rights (privacy, security, autonomy…) • Election ad transparency (political funding, searchable databases…) • Public interest audits for AI (e.g., open APIs for alg. transparency) • Enforcement against anticompetitive behaviors in the industry • National security apparatus to combat nefarious actors • Public education on digital content, news, and disinformation • Public service journalism
  174. 174. The broader issue
  175. 175. Identity Politics Fragmented Media Markets Decline of Public Service Journalism Corruption + Money in Politics Disinformation Widening Economic Inequality Distrust of the Failing State Tribal Partisan Division Norm Breaking in Democratic Institutions
  176. 176. Thank you!
  177. 177. June 6, 2018 Sandra CortesiUNDERSTANDING YOUNGER GENERATIONS: A STUDY OF THE PEOPLE USING THE WEB Illustrations by Youth and Media Youth Advisor Elsa Brown @ https://www.behance.net/ebrown726e4b6 Silly Robots by Chris Lloyd @ www.yllw.co.uk/sillyrobots/
  178. 178. SANDRA CORTESI • Twitter: @sandracortesi • Email: scortesi@cyber.law.harvard.edu
  179. 179. [In most cases, youth ages 12-18; based on focus group interviews with over 300 young people.] Illustrations by Youth and Media Youth Advisor Elsa Brown
  180. 180. TODAY: • Three youth practices 1. Online/offline 2. Platform diversification 3. Information/interaction lifecycle • Three ideas for more youth engagement 1. Enter youth spaces 2. Shape your mindset / adapt a youth perspective 3. Enable participation • Three themes that matter 1. Environmental issues 2. Identity 3. Crafts, skills, pathways, and fair labor
  181. 181. 1 ONLINE/OFFLINE
  182. 182. 2007 2010 2013 2015 2016 2018
  183. 183. PRICE?
  184. 184. Implications: • Think about online and offline interfaces. • The key is creating the right experience, whether it’s online or off.
  185. 185. 2 PLATFORM DIVERSIFICATION
  186. 186. Platform Diversification 1. Individual / peer group(s) 2. Audiences 3. Features / affordances 4. Context 5. Perceived intimacy/privacy
  187. 187. Social Media & Harvard (2014) • Which of the following best describes your school or affiliation? • How often do you use the following social media platforms for personal use? Please place a mark in the appropriate boxes. • How often do you use the following social media platforms for academic or professional use? Please place a mark in the appropriate boxes. • Which of the following social media platforms do you use most often for personal, and which one for academic or professional use? Please place a mark in the appropriate boxes. • On the platform you use most for academic or professional use, how would you feel about: • On the platform you use most for personal use, how would you feel about: • What tools / platforms / website are you using for academic or professional purposes you think are exciting and would like to encourage more people to use? • For the social media platform I use most, my privacy settings: • How much do you limit what your professors can see on your Facebook profile? • I post updates/photos that I do not want a college administrator or future employer to see: • How comfortable would you feel if... • How would you rate the following social media scenarios? • What role do you feel Harvard should play online? • Which of the following would you want the University to use to share information/communicate with you? Check all that apply. • On which of the following would you feel comfortable interacting with faculty? Check all that apply. • Which of the following Harvard social media accounts are you following/looking at on a regular basis?
  188. 188. # Question Like Don't Like Don't Care Not sure how I'd feel Total Responses Mean 1 Harvard University having an account 89 5 69 2 165 1.90 2 Harvard University friending/following you 66 34 42 18 160 2.08 3 Faculty members having accounts 96 10 54 5 165 1.81 4 Faculty members following you generally. 73 36 32 18 159 1.97 5 Departments or centers having accounts 100 5 56 3 164 1.77 6 Departments/center following you 73 37 41 10 161 1.93 7 Administrators having an account 62 25 69 8 164 2.14 8 Administrators following you 45 68 38 11 162 2.09 9 Other students having accounts 129 1 34 2 166 1.45 10 Other students friending/following you 131 3 25 4 163 1.40 5. On the platform you use most for academic or professional use, how would you feel about:
  189. 189. # Question Very uncomfortable Somewhat uncomfortable Neutral Somewhat comfortable Very comfortable Total Responses Mean 1 Harvard followed or friended you on social media? 20 60 41 28 16 165 2.76 2 Harvard shared what you posted on social media with its followers? 50 48 26 28 12 164 2.41 3 Harvard shared your student groups' events with other students over social media? 10 19 29 37 70 165 3.84 11. How comfortable would you feel if...
  190. 190. Implications: • Where the conversation takes place is constantly evolving. • Move away from a solely online and platform-specific approach toward a more holistic approach. • Be prepared to respond to feedback, incl. negative feedback.
  191. 191. 3 INFORMATION / INTERACTION LIFECYCLE
  192. 192. Source: http://thebln.com/wp- content/uploads/2017/03/2017-Internet-Minute.jpg
  193. 193. ECHO LOOK GOOGLE HOME
  194. 194. Implications: • Engage young people in ways they can relate (more messy, quick/short, in real time, unfiltered and with filters). • Co-create with youth and their communities conversations alongside your employees, youth influencers, and experts. • Support the issues that are at the core of what matters most to youth today. • Trust is important. Youth want to know how institutions are using their personal information and how the information will be protected.
  195. 195. TODAY: • Three youth practices 1. Online/offline 2. Platform diversification 3. Information/interaction lifecycle • Three ideas for more youth engagement 1. Enter youth spaces 2. Shape your mindset / adapt a youth perspective 3. Enable participation • Three themes that matter 1. Environmental issues 2. Identity 3. Crafts, skills, pathways, and fair labor
  196. 196. ENTER YOUTH SPACES. 1
  197. 197. As (young) users shift priority from social networks to messaging apps like WhatsApp, Snapchat, Facebook Messenger, etc., they have become powerful news platforms.
  198. 198. SHAPE YOUR MINDSET / ADAPT A YOUTH PERSPECTIVE. 2
  199. 199. ENABLE PARTICIPATION. 3
  200. 200. TODAY: • Three youth practices 1. Online/offline 2. Platform diversification 3. Information/interaction lifecycle • Three ideas for more youth engagement 1. Enter youth spaces 2. Shape your mindset / adapt a youth perspective 3. Enable participation • Three themes that matter 1. Environmental issues 2. Identity 3. Crafts, skills, pathways, and fair labor
  201. 201. 1 CARING ABOUT THE ENVIRONMENT
  202. 202. FACTS: Also Known As: Tolly Dolly Posh Famous As: Blogger Nationality: U.K. Age: 17 Years Tolmeia
  203. 203. 2 EXPLORING IDENTITY
  204. 204. Diversity and inclusion demographic categories of interest include: ethnicity, race, gender, gender and sexual identity, religion, national origin, location, age, and educational (skill level) and/or socioeconomic status.
  205. 205. 3 SHOWCASING CRAFTS, SKILLS, PATHWAYS, AND FAIR LABOR
  206. 206. CONNECT • Twitter • @sandracortesi • @youthandmedia • Pages • youthandmedia.org • Email: scortesi@cyber.law.harvard.edu
  207. 207. CREDITS • Illustrations by Elsa Brown • Silly Robots by Chris Lloyd @ www.yllw.co.uk/sillyrobots/ • Icons: https://thenounproject.com/ • Pictures: • Data and data analytics: https://media.licdn.com/mpr/mpr/shrinknp_800_800/AAEAAQAAAAAAAAcSAAAAJDJlNDA0YTgyLTA4NTEt NGFlYS05ZWU5LWZjM2RmZmQ2N2ZkMw.jpg • Be optimistic: https://img00.deviantart.net/2f5f/i/2014/338/4/e/be_optimistic__by_lilbumblebear-d7bmlcp.png • Social media worries: https://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/2017/technology-social-media.PDF • Internet minute: Source: http://thebln.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/2017-Internet-Minute.jpg • Global Shapers Survey 2017: http://shaperssurvey2017.org/static/data/WEF_GSC_Annual_Survey_2017.pdf • End of the world: https://www.geek.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/end-of-the-world-625x350.jpg
  208. 208. Digital Innovation June 6, 2018
  209. 209. PERSONAL 3D PRINTER photo: wikimedia commons
  210. 210. FUNCTIONAL 3D-PRINTED HANDGUN photo: wikimedia commons
  211. 211. photo: @Doug88888, Flickr.com NEWS BIG
  212. 212. POLITICAL PARTIES photo: Gage Skidmore, Flickr.com BIG
  213. 213. photo: ehpien, Flickr.com GOVERNMENT BIG
  214. 214. photo: wikimedia commons ARMIES BIG
  215. 215. photo: Dawn Ashley, Flickr.com FUN BIG
  216. 216. photo: W. & D. Downey, wikimedia commons THE END OF MONARCHY
  217. 217. The Cray-1 Computer, by walt74, on Flickr
  218. 218. images: wikimedia commons THE EVOLUTION OF THE COMPUTER 1970’s 1980’s 1990’s 2000’s 2010’s
  219. 219. Internet Map
  220. 220. photo: wZa HK, Flickr.com INDIVIDUAL
  221. 221. photo: Josh Kenzer, Flickr.com INTIMATE
  222. 222. photo: AJ Ashton, Flickr.com INTENTIONAL
  223. 223. Online Communications Big Email List Online Community Off-line Actions
  224. 224. Building Online Communications Organization Infrastructure Innovation Big List Online Community Off-line Action
  225. 225. • Generalist • Small, flat teams • Use of volunteers • Content production • Testing-driven culture Building Online Communications Organization Infrastructure Innovation • Webtools • Data • Analytics • Early & Often – speed & volume • Test, test, test • Aggressive segmentation • Risk tolerance
  226. 226. Content Marketing (Partners, associations, articles) Organic Search (Google, Yahoo, Bing) Paid Search (Google AdWords) Social Networks (Facebook, Blogs, Twitter) Email (regular, tested communications) Direct Visitors (Business cards, events, splash) Traffic Web site Landing Page Micro sites Prospect Download Submit Webform Engagement action Acquisition Webinar/ Demo Social Media Email / Phone Engagement Click-Through (Leakage Point #1) Call to Action (Leakage Point #2) Initial Contact (Leakage Point #3) ➢ Low organic ranking ➢ Ineffective paid ad copy ➢ Wrong keywords ➢ Sub optimal bid strategy ➢ Email content not compelling ➢ Offer not relevant to needs ➢ Confusing value proposition ➢ Ineffective call to action ➢ Response time too long ➢ Impersonal response ➢ Offer not tailored to online behavior Activation Conversion Scoring Nurturing Offline Promotion (Mail, radio, print) New Donor Donor Conversion (Leakage Point #4) ➢ Lack of focus on priority opportunities ➢ Failure to understand and overcome objections ➢ “Just not ready” Building a Big List
  227. 227. NICCO MELE twitter: @nicco nicco_mele@hks.harvard.edu nicco.org READ THE BOOK from ST. MARTIN’S PRESS EndofBig.com

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