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Train the trainer what we are training and who we are training

Understanding learning styles

Train the trainer what we are training and who we are training

  1. 1. TRAIN THE TRAINER WHO AND WHAT ARE WE TRAINING Understanding Learning Style Author: Harsh Vardhan Note: It is critical to appreciate that different adults have different learning styles. Similarly the in depth understanding of the subject, upon which training is being conducted – leads to better results. Usually when planning a training program, this gets ignored; leading to less than acceptable results. Although this presentation addresses AT&T /Bell South Training (Telecom)process, this can be adapted to any training program, and is not any industry specific.
  2. 2. WHO ARE WE TRAINING As Trainers/Coaches/Mentors or generally speaking in the role of Human Resource Developer - we need to find the easiest way to reach out to people.
  3. 3. WHO ARE WE TRAINING INDIVIDUAL LEARNING STYLES There are 3 individual learning styles. It is pertinent to understand and incorporate it in the training, design, and delivery. The differences are in the relation with which different individuals receive/perceive, process and respond to information.
  4. 4. WHO ARE WE TRAINING INDIVIDUAL LEARNING STYLES •We respond differently to teaching methods and to different teachers. •Considering our own learning experiences, we will remember doing better in some topics than others. •We retained some content more accurately and longer than some. Part of this corresponds to our different learning style. •It means that our response differs from others, based on, content, delivery, learning environment and teaching techniques.
  5. 5. WHO ARE WE TRAINING RECEIVING INFORMATION
  6. 6. WHO ARE WE TRAINING RECEIVING INFORMATION Our 5 senses receive information consciously and subconsciously. Depending on context, most information comes through, sight, hearing and touch.
  7. 7. WHO ARE WE TRAINING RECEIVING INFORMATION •Individual’s differences in the preferred mode lead to differences in the speed of transmission and response to the information. •Neurological Research has established that the information is received as per pre-set priority, so not all information is treated as equal.
  8. 8. WHO ARE WE TRAINING RECEIVING INFORMATION Trainers benefit from understanding the benefit of judging this (Individuals emit their preferred style of learning, all the time without a having a clue to it) on the onset by customizing their method of delivery – "Horses for the courses - Approach".
  9. 9. WHO ARE WE TRAINING VAK MODEL
  10. 10. WHO ARE WE TRAINING
  11. 11. WHO ARE WE TRAINING VAK MODEL VISUAL - Those who learn more by sight. They remember more of what they see. Prefer to take notes and diagrams. They are more apt to learning better with the help of – •Handouts •Flip Charts •Demonstration •Videos and Films •Projection Systems •Charts, Maps, Mind maps E.g. – 1.Videos of the actual AT&T Bellsouth Services in use. Video of roll play. Video simulation of situations. 2.Chart demonstrating the position of the mouth and the tongue showing, the sound for ‘American Accent’ learning.
  12. 12. WHO ARE WE TRAINING AUDITORY - A group of people display a behavior of learning corresponding to more discussion, speeches and lectures. Reading to facilitate the internal auditory process. They are more apt to learn better with the help of – •Lecture type activities •Questions and Answers •Audio Tapes •Discussion E.g. – 1. Small Group Activities - Like short skits in ‘American Accent’. 2. Frequent Listening sessions of Sales recording. 3. Discussions on, “Correct Leadership Practices”.
  13. 13. WHO ARE WE TRAINING KINESTHETIC - Learning by doing and moving around. More energetic group, which display movement, while doing activities - which do not require movement. They prefer to get up and experience the task. •Role Play •Exercises •Touching and Manipulating things •Opportunities to "do it" through practice. E.g. – 1.Models of products being sold. 2. Role play of leadership situations. 3.Short American drama for accent.
  14. 14. WHO ARE WE TRAINING •All training styles need to be incorporated for successful training. ‘Program Design’ needs to incorporate this. •Trainers need to take care that people can learn from other than their preferred mode, hence all modes need to be addressed - as frequently as possible.
  15. 15. WHO ARE WE TRAINING •The trainers learning style can impede the style of delivery. •The nature of the topic itself can be Visual, Auditory or Kinesthetic.
  16. 16. PROCESSING THE INFORMATION WHO ARE WE TRAINING
  17. 17. WHO ARE WE TRAINING PROCESSING THE INFORMATION •Human brain is an extremely complex organ which is ultimately responsible for our behavior. •Post processing received information; it decides the behavior to display the response. Common estimate is About 10% of the capacity of the brain gets used.
  18. 18. WHO ARE WE TRAINING PROCESSING THE INFORMATION -We read at the speed of 40 words per minute -We listen at the speed of 80 words per minute -We think at the speed of up to 300 words per minute -We process information at the speed of 120 words per minute -The Human brain is often referred to as Triune brain, as it is made of three structures; The Brain Stem, The Mid Brain and The Cortex.
  19. 19. WHO ARE WE TRAINING THE BRAIN STEM – Popularly known as the reptilian brain, it is primitive in nature and the primal responses emit from it.
  20. 20. WHO ARE WE TRAINING THE MID BRAIN - Controls our emotional response to information. This is important in context of training as emotional responses are linked to memory. •The challenge for the trainers is to create emotional links so that the memory of it is retained. •This is often achieved by linking the topic or events, into strong memories or values that the participants have, by creating a learning event that is challenging, rewarding and enjoyable. •One has to be however extremely careful as poor training can be just as strong.
  21. 21. WHO ARE WE TRAINING THE CORTEX - It is the most developed part of the brain. It is responsible for thought and manages language and symbols. It receives information, processes and matches the same with earlier stored information or experience. It then chooses the most appropriate response. It is divided into ‘Left brain’ and ‘Right brain’.
  22. 22. WHO ARE WE TRAINING RESPONDING TO INFORMATION
  23. 23. WHO ARE WE TRAINING RESPONDING TO INFORMATION If learning is defined as change in behavior as a result of experience, training should be designed to allow the participant to behave, or select responses, which matches their style. Learning can be structured through a discovery process of 4 quadrants. 44 Reflection 1Reflection 1 IntroductionIntroduction 22 AcquisitionAcquisition 33 PracticePractice
  24. 24. WHO ARE WE TRAINING RESPONDING TO INFORMATION •The introduction quadrant is the point where the rapport gets build, linking topics to personal experiences and motivating the learner to the task should occur. Often not enough time is given to this. •This is a reminder that the training cannot be training centric, as only this quadrant relates to delivery of the training. In all other we play the role of the facilitator.
  25. 25. WHO ARE WE TRAINING RESPONDING TO INFORMATION •Session design becomes the process of selecting appropriate activities for each quadrant and each varies in providing variety to preferred learning style. •The reflection quadrant is often ignored. Participants often display acquired skill or knowledge in 3rd quadrant, are assessed and then go home. •If the transfer of the classroom performance has to be to the work place; time is required for the 4th quadrant.
  26. 26. WHO ARE WE TRAINING RESPONDING TO INFORMATION •Time taken in each quadrant is variable, depending on the content and the learners, however all quadrants need to be covered for effective training. •All training should begin with an introduction and finish with a review. The trainer can decide to divide the course into several acquisition and practice sessions before closing.
  27. 27. WHO ARE WE TRAINING RESPONDING TO INFORMATION •The skills that make this model work are abilities to move easily from one quadrant to an other. •Good questioning, good instructions and good links to the learners experience and expectations are imperative to the whole process.
  28. 28. WHO ARE WE TRAINING ESTABLISHING THE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT
  29. 29. WHO ARE WE TRAINING ESTABLISHING THE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT •Trainers should start the process of establishing rapport before the contents are introduced. •As trainers we want to be able to influence participants and to accept the ideas we present, therefore the ability to build relationship is critical and non-negotiable.
  30. 30. WHO ARE WE TRAINING BUILDING RAPPORT
  31. 31. WHO ARE WE TRAINING 2 KEY STRATEGIES TO BUILDING RAPPORT 1.Present self to the participants, not as an expert, but as a person with similar perceptions and values. Acknowledging the expertise of the group and clarifying the role of a person with alternative approach and additional skills/knowledge, to do their job.
  32. 32. WHO ARE WE TRAINING 2 KEY STRATEGIES TO BUILDING RAPPORT 2.Build rapport before the formal training begins by meeting and greeting learners as they arrive to establish a common point of contact. It may begin with knowledge of where they live or some other aspect of their lives, or shared expectation of the course.
  33. 33. WHO ARE WE TRAINING SETTING EXPECTATIONS
  34. 34. WHO ARE WE TRAINING SOME EXPECTATIONS CAN BE FORMED BY: The way training room is presented – • Dressing standards • Focus on time keeping • Use of appropriate openers • Quality of handout and resources • Use of body language and gestures • Matching the language to that of the group • Clarity in setting expectations and giving instructions
  35. 35. WHO ARE WE TRAINING OPENERS “First impression is…,” Participants are likely to be distracted, insecure or self –conscious in the unfamiliar environment. They may arrive in negative frame of mind, depending on factors external.
  36. 36. WHO ARE WE TRAINING OPENERS To overcome these distractions, an opener is required to act in a manner that will: •Be fun •Focus on the topic or lead on it •Create an opportunity to meet and greet An opener with all 3 factors addressed will soon get the group interested, involved and actively participating. This sets the tone for work that follows.
  37. 37. WHAT ARE WE TRAINING CONTENT Analysis of course content comprises of gathering information about the knowledge, skills and attitude.
  38. 38. WHAT ARE WE TRAINING CONTENT •Mind mapping it to get the big picture and determine the manageable chunks of learning, logically sequencing it. •Omitting what is non-essential on the basis of "need to".
  39. 39. WHAT ARE WE TRAINING CONTENT ANALYSIS •It can be seen as planning the organizational aspects of training course design. •Its purpose being to identify the performance gap in the organization.
  40. 40. WHAT ARE WE TRAINING CONTENT ANALYSIS •Its objective being to define the performance required of the individual participant. •Its analysis focusing on the Knowledge, Skills and Attitude required for the said performance.
  41. 41. WHAT ARE WE TRAINING CONDUCTING A CONTENT ANALYSIS The sequence of the analysis – 1. Gather the Information 2. Create a mind map to link all the ideas and to see the whole picture. 3. Decide on logical sequence. 4. Prioritize the contents.
  42. 42. WHAT ARE WE TRAINING SOURCES FOR GATHERING THE INFORMATION 1. Job Description 2. Work Profile or KRA (Key Responsibility Areas) 3. Questionnaire 4. Self-Analysis 5. Observation 6. Interviewing 7. Diaries 8. Panel of Experts
  43. 43. WHAT ARE WE TRAINING CREATING A MIND MAP •Mind Mapping is described as a 'Whole Brain' approach of combining Brainstorming, Note taking and Planning. •Using such a map allows for visual of a whole picture, group ideas and a logical decision about the content. •The major advantage of this technique is that it allows for the non-linear process of the neurological.
  44. 44. WHAT ARE WE TRAINING CREATING A MIND MAP Using a Mind Map in the context of the training allows it to be broken into manageable logical sequence. Each key area is broken down further into sub-areas which then require their own performance objective and session plans.
  45. 45. WHAT ARE WE TRAINING DECIDING ON THE LOGICAL SEQUENCE
  46. 46. WHAT ARE WE TRAINING DECIDING ON THE LOGICAL SEQUENCE •It is the act of analyzing the relationship between the different chunks of learning and developing an efficient learning sequence. •Learning order is important as not mastering the previous set of information would make the learning of the next set illogical, incomplete or impossible.
  47. 47. WHAT ARE WE TRAINING DECIDING ON THE LOGICAL SEQUENCE Tasks, skills and procedures are the most self-sequencing. A task is achieved generally through a logical sequence. A task mind map would document all actual steps. A secondary branch would capture – •All related knowledge or skills. •All critical attitudes required to perform the job completely. •All technical knowledge required to performing the work efficiently.
  48. 48. WHAT ARE WE TRAINING KNOWLEDGE SEQUENCE IS LIKELY TO BE EFFECTED BY THE FACTORS AS UNDER – Pre-requisites: The order of information flow. Simple to complex: Start with easy to understand. Known to the Unknown: Using the knowledge that the participants bring to the table and use it further as the building block.
  49. 49. WHAT ARE WE TRAINING PRIORITIZING THE CONTENT •Deciding upon the detail of required knowledge detail to perform competently as per the organizational requirement. •Deciding upon the amount of time that is required for the practice. •Gauging the knowledge that the participant's will bring to the table.
  50. 50. WHAT ARE WE TRAINING Ultimately to decide upon the content a simple thumb of the rule equation – •Must Know •Should Know •Could Know
  51. 51. WHAT ARE WE TRAINING Plan well and get started. Thank you.

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