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The Happy Ghosts of Harbord - Harbordite No. 30

  1. 1. The Happy Ghosts of Harbord by Charles Girlder (Staff, 1925-57) Pleasant it was at Harbord when the green fields lay near by, And pleasant for the boys and girls who saw things eye to eye For astronomy is noted for its regular eclipse And the linguistic courses have led to scholarships. Oh, the jolly ghosts of Harbord; - how they threw the bricks about When renovation came our way and the new gym steps fell out! Pleasant it was when ceilings sank; it gave us cheerful heart To see the jolly ghosts of old just taking things apart. The happy ghosts of Harbord just meet you at the door; Past - Present - Future - Ever - they're yours for evermore. And the glorious thing in Harbord ghosts, the first day you arrive They are never dead or buried, - they're very much alive. (1931) HARBORD CENTENNIAL PUBLICATION GROUP Julius Molinaro - President & Editor Ithoda Tepper - Vice-President Ituth (;reen - Secretar)' Mannie (;rossman - Treasurer Willie Zimmerman - Research & Archives Corinne Salsberg - Proofreader Myriam Landry - Design & T)'pograph)' Vicky Armanios June Keshen Eleanor Bissell Irving Keshen E.G. Bulmer Jennie Klotz Sam Cass Fran Lipton Sid Caplan Evelyn Lent Fred Catzman Dorothy Leatherbarrow John Flinn Hugh A. MacDonald William G. Goddard Bea Myers Charles Goldsbie Ben Nobleman Helen Gray Ken Prentice Peggy Guest Rosslyn Scharf Dr. Mildred Green Mildred Selznick Jack Harryman John Weinzweig William C. Hunter Tony Wild Allan Hux Lena Winesanker Henrietta Johnson Betty Zeldin The publication of this book was made possible through the assistance of the New Horizons Program, Social Service Programs, Health & Welfare Canada.
  2. 2. FOREWORD "Time has no divisions to mark its passage, there is never a thunderstorm or blare of trumpets to announce the beginning of a month or year." Thomas Mann's observation reminds us that the first century in the life of Harbord Collegiate Institute ended and that a new one began without a fanfare or a 21-gun salute to mark the turning point. Last fall-the eve of the birth of Harbord's second century-witnessed the inauguration of the Harbord Museum which, if not the first in Canada, is distinguished by its architectural design. The first major undertaking of the centennial year was the creation of the Harbord Museum which came into being in time to accommodate the growing collection of a century's memorabilia, donated by former students, their families and friends. The second major event of the Centennial was the production of this volume, properly referred to as issue number 30 of the Harbordite, and which has been in preparation for more than two years. The Harbordite was created in 1979 as the newsletter of the Harbord Club, itself formed in 1978, and as an active communications network between members and the school. In the course of its labours, the Harbordite uncovered the myriad aspects of Harbord's rich and varied history. It did not immediately occur to the Harbordite editorial staff that the material gathered and published in the newsletter would be of crucial importance later. The newsletter was the seed, this centennial volume, its flower. When, as 1992 approached, it occurred to members that a centennial volume was one of the best ways to commemorate Harbord's first century of life, two significant elements were found to be missing- first of all, funding, and secondly, a larger editorial staff. This deficiency rapidly led to the formation of the Harbord Centennial Publication Group which, initially recruited as a nucleus from the Harbordite staff, later drafted a willing number of experienced hands from the fields of teaching, publishing, business, finance and advertising. Now, thus duly constituted, the Harbord Centennial Publication Group was in a position to apply to the New Horizons Program, Social Services Programs, Health and Welfare Canada for a grant - a subsidy that made the production of the centennial volume a reality. The Group's task was also facilitated by the large fund of research material that had been gathered and published in the Harbordite over the past 13 years and construction on this base began. The history of Harbord presents a valuable record of facts, occurrences, anecdotes, biography, discourse and narrative-a record viewed through the eyes of students who attended the school, and their teachers. The title of the volume was inspired by the title of a poem by Charles Girdler who, between 1925 and 1957, brought to life in his classes in ancient history, the leading figures of Greece and Rome; and who, in English classes, introduced his students to drama in the skits and plays which he directed and presented on the stage of Harbord's auditorium. The stage provided a broad avenue for that versatile master's creative talent, delighting generations of appreciative student audiences, and simultaneously serving as an experimental theatre, or laboratory. Many went on to make show business their vocation of a lifetime; the stage, at least, provided a valuable introduction to the human comedy following graduation. "The Happy Ghosts of Harbord" is dedicated to the late Ken Prentice (,31), a founding member of the Harbord Club and a contributor of many pages of the Harbordite, documenting in straightforward fashion the various facets of Harbord's centennial life. Ken devoted long hours to unearthing buried relics of the school's past and to weaving seemingly unconnected threads into a coherent tale, an accomplishment for which his classical studies had eminently prepared him. The organization of the volume proved to be a simple matter as each piece found its rightful place in one of the six chapters into which the book is divided. Chapter One, on the history of the school, follows the evolution of the institution through war and peace and through the successive waves of immigration to Canada. While Chapter Two is a "who's who" of principals and some teachers, Chapter Three provides a cornucopia of student ingenuity, invention and innovation in sports, drama and music. Chapter Four chronicles the accomplishments of alumni in diverse fields of endeavour, and Chapter Five comprises letters to the editor, a mixed bag of opinion, comments or nostalgic recollections, an essential feature of the Harbordite, and too important not to occupy its own niche. Chapter Six, on permanent endowments, which are managed by the six directors of the Harbord Charitable Foundation for the benefit of students, presents biographical sketches of the honorees, in whose name scholarships were established by peers, friends or relatives. The centennial edition is a tribute to a school which has fostered excellence since its inception and to all the alumni of this cherished institution who may have left its halls forever but have always retained an indescribable, enduring something of its legacy. Julius Molinaro Editor
  3. 3. PRINCIPAL'S MESSAGE Harbord's one hundredth birthday is a wonderful occasion to celebrate! This we did on October 31st, 1991, when the whole school kicked off our centennial celebration with a big birthday party in the gym. This party followed a special assembly where the time capsule from the 1931 comer stone was opened by Premier Bob Rae and Nataline Rodrigues, President of our Student Council. The contents of this time capsule are on display now in our beatiful new museum room, which was also opened on October 31st. As the current Principal of the school, I invite you to visit, any time at your convenience, the Harbord Museum. It contains many items which illustrate the Harbord tradition of excellence-both in the academic and extracurricular fields. You will be filled with pride as you examine the memorabilia going back to 1892. Pride in Harbord also goes back to those starting days when the Toronto Board of Education purchased pasture land from Alex Manning, began construction in 1890, and opened the doors in January 1892 to 170 students. This pride is clearly stated in a letter taken out of the 1931 time capsule. It was written on March 13,1931 by Col. Hagarty, who was the Assistant Principal from 1892 to 1906 and Principal from 1906 unti11928. In referring to pride, he states, among other things: "Pride in the greatness of the school, its achievements, its reputation from coast to coast won in its early days under my former Principal, Dr. H. B. Spotton; pride in my association with such a Principal and fellow teachers of national renown; pride in the privilege of being an instructor of hundreds, nay, thousands of boys and girls many of whom have gained distinction in the land, and the like of whom it would be difficult to match the world over." As you browse though the pages of this beautiful Centennial Book, I am sure that you will experience many hours of nostalgic enjoyment. We are all grateful to Julius Molinaro, the book's editor, and his support staff, for producing such an outstanding book! Many people have worked very hard to produce a successful centennial reunion, and it is always dangerous to start focusing on specific names. However, there is one name which I must mention because this 1933 graduate has been Harbord's strongest supporter for many years. I am of course referring to Willie Zimmerman! He was one of the founding members of the Harbord Club, has built up the membership to over 2000 names, guided the museum room through to completion and has been invaluable in all the centennial planning. Thanks, Willie! I hope that thousands of you will be able to return to the school for the centennial celebrations in May, 1992. Welcome home! This is the time to reminisce, to renew friendships and as a Harbordite grad, staff member, or friend, to say with renewed pride- Onward Harbord! Don Creighton
  4. 4. Harbord Collegiate Centennial Day 7:e celebration ofa hundredth anniversary provides a sublime opportunity to explore the achievements ofyesterday, to celebrate the results ofthose achievements today, and to build on the foundations ofthose achievements for tomorrow. For a century, Harbord Collegiate has been home to successive waves ofimmigrant young people whose unswerving dedication to learning has produced an impressive and unequalled scholastic record. At Harbord. Ontario Scholars are the rule rather than the exception, and the who's who ofalumni includes a prestigious and prolific list ofnotable community leaders. The brightness ofour City's future is guaranteed by the outstanding qualities ofits youngest residents. These young men and women continue to be splendidly represented by the current students at Harbord Collegiate who carry on the legacy of exceptional learning coupled with a keen interest in current community issues. On behalfofmy colleagues on City Council, it is a pleasure to salute the past and present educators and scholars ofHarbord Collegiate on a century of meritorious community service, by proclaiming May 9, 1992 in the City of Toronto as Harbord Collegiate Centennial Day. Well done, Tigers! ~~(2J~ Mayor May 9, 1992
  5. 5. HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL History of Harbord by Ruth (Cohen) Green here have been great strides in the After the school was built, one curious Many Harbord pupils have achieved T educational system throughout this continent in the years since the forties: teacher-training is more special- cow decided to pay a visit to the students, and sauntered through the side entrance into the school grounds. notable success in business and profes- sional life. Some of these are-Gordon Skilling, professor of political science at ized; certification and specialist certifi- At this time the section around the the University of Wisconsin, and a noted cates are almost an insurance policy for a University between Avenue Road and broadcaster; the late Dr. E. W. Wallace, teaching position; new sports have been Bathurst Street, north of Bloor, was a former President and Chancellor of Vic- added to the in-school programs; compe- wealthy residential district, which filled toria University; Dr. Charles Best, one of tition is wider-spread and records have up very quickly, and clamoured for a the oustanding physiologists of the world, become more and more amazing. New high school. In the fall of 1890 work on now director of the Banting-Best Depart- subjects have been discovered and added the original building was begun with Mr. ment of Medical Research; Gregory to the curricula; guidance is a scheduled Storm as architect. It was a fifteen-room Clark, prominent Toronto writer; Dr. part of a student's timetable and the school with an assembly hall and gymna- Saul Dushman, Assistant Director of importance of Psychological Services has sium. The picture near the music room General Electric Research Laboratory at been recognized. Buildings have been gives an idea of its appearance. In 1892 Schenectady, New York; Beverley Bax- modernized, computerized and brightly the school opened with 250 pupils. ter, journalist and political figure in decorated; student-teacher relationships The school grew rapidly. By the autumn Great Britain; Garfield Weston, head of are more open; myriad new texts have of the first year attendance had risen the Weston Biscuit Company and mem- appeared-we could go on ad infinitum. from two hundred and fifty pupils to be- ber of the British House of Commons; Although it is hardly likely that we will tween three and four hundred and it was Sir Edward Beatty, President of the be here for the Harbord Bicentennial, it necessary to add to the staff. Harbord C.P.R.; Dr. Sherwood Fox, President of will no doubt be a very changed atmos- was now overcrowded and for the first Western University; Dr. C. T. Currelly, phere with unimaginable, innovations (at time the Board was compelled to equalize Director of the Museum of Archeology; least we of the 90s can't foresee all the attendance by assigning boundaries to and Dr. E. F. Burston, Director of the changes). But certainly we present-day the three Collegiate Institutes-Jarvis, Department of Physics at the University Harbord Alumni and students, our activ- Parkdale and Harbord. Harbord's bound- of Toronto. ities and accomplishments will form an aries were Avenue Rd., Queen's Park, In military achievement, Harbord integral part of the next 100 years' and Simcoe St. on the east and Dufferin Collegiate has had a notable record. In History of Harbord. We have only to St. on the west. By 1906 attendance had the last Great War, nearly five hundred reflect on the first 50 years to have climbed to more than seven hundred. To pupils and teachers answered the call to an insight: provide for additional pupils, the gymna- arms. Colonel Hagarty, then principal, sium and assembly hall were made into was commissioned to raise the 101st "Fifty Glorious Years!" This title and classrooms, and some first-form classes Battalion. the following excerpts from an article in were transferred to the third storey of In the year 1920, the Lieutenant-Gov- the Harbord Review of 1942, best des- King Edward School. In September of ernor of Ontario, His Honour Colonel cribes Harbord Collegiate Institute as it the following year, this Harbord Annex Harry Cockshutt, unveiled the monument was: was made a separate unit, and was named in front of Harbord Collegiate Institute, "Are you sure this is Harbord Colle- "North West High School." From this dedicated to the students who fell in the giate Institute?" asked the old man with nucleus grew Oakwood Collegiate. first World War. This bronze statue was the orange and black tie. "It certainly has The school as it now stands may be created by the Canadian sculptor, G.W. changed since I was a pupil here in the said to have been completed in September Hill of Montreal, and was cast in Belgium. 1890s." And indeed it has. 1931-a modem, handsome, and well- On Thursday, November 12, 1931, Harbord has now behind it fifty years equipped building. General Sir Arthur Currie unveiled the of glorious tradition and it is with just From the beginning, Harbord has won photographs of the seventy-three students pride that we point to them now. envious honours in scholarship. Three of killed in defence of freedom and democ- Let us look back at the Harbord Dis- its graduates have won the Rhodes Schol- racy. These photographs hang in the front trict of fifty years ago. We can scarcely arship-E. R. Patterson in 1902, R. C. hall of the school. recognize it. Planks then served as side- Reed in 1906 and Gordon Skilling in In the second World War, Harbord walks on Harbord Street and bicycle 1934. The Prince of Wales Scholarship, Collegiate once more is playing a full part. riding on these walks was forbidden. awarded by the University of Toronto to Major Brian S. McCool left at once for Houses were few. One stood on the site the Honour Matriculation candidate who active service overseas. Mr. Murray Gra- of the drug store at Bathurst and Har- stands highest in the Province in two ham and Mr. H. Hill are R.C.A.F. in- bord Streets. A slaughterhouse was loca- departments has been won by six Har- structors, and many former students of ted somewhere near the present Palmer- bord pupils. Other scholarships have Harbord are now in our army, navy and ston Boulevard, and cows were often been consistently gained by brilliant air force. Several have already laid down driven along Bathurst and Harbord Harbord pupils. The photographs of their lives. Streets. scholarship winners hang in the hall to No account of Harbord would be com- the east of the auditorium. plete without mention of its musical activi- -1-
  6. 6. HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL ties. An orchestra, organized in 1926 greatly increased. More pupils took part in immortality than society usually accords under the leadership of Mr. McCool with the games. Swimming became more and school teachers." a few players, had, a few years later, over more popular. Many awards were given in Two women teachers are of greater thirty members. From the beginning the lifesaving and in branches of the work historical importance than the men, for orchestra has had a high standard in its of the St. John Ambulance Association. they played a part in the educational selection of good music. The school choir Though the Cadet Corps was abolished by emancipation of women. Eliza Balmer has had a similar aim. In 1933 the choir the Board of Education, the essential was among the first to be allowed to take and orchestra combined to produce the features of the service in marksmanship, university examinations, and she won, in first Gilbert and Sullivan operettas, "The signalling, ambulance work, and the bugle competition with the men, three scholar- Pirates of Penzance." This established a band were continued at Harbord. ships in General Proficiency and Modern cherished Harbord custom. But the big innovation was made in Languages. Gertrude Lawler was one of Many well-known musicians are among music. The orchestra had already estab- three women named to the senate of the the ranks of Harbord graduates-Broadus lished for itself an enviable reputation, but University of Toronto in 1910, another Farmer of the studio bearing his name; there had been no singing. An excellent important breach in old-age male privilege. Harry Adaskin, former first violinist in girls' choir was formed, then a group of the Hart House String Quartette; Law- boys ventured to take to the air. With The Harbord of the classes of 1931-35 rence Defoe, tenor soloist; Morris Surdin, many misgivings it was decided to present were the first years of a fme new building. who arranges music for Horace Lapp and some of the many Gilbert and Sullivan (It is interesting to note that the original the C.B.C.; Harry Keith Beattie, formerly operettas. So amazingly successful was the building was valued at $105,000; the on the musical stage in London, (now in presentation that in each successive year a building was valued at $567,000 in 1941.) the army); Al Steinberg, Hyman Gova- similar operetta has been presented. For many, these were also the worst years man, and Isadore Desser, violin soloists of the Great Depression. with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra; Mary Campbell, during 1940-41, Even today, reference is made socio- and John Weinzweig on the C.B.C. staff. made a collection of material which she logically to the "several incidents of anti- In the world of sports Harbord has also placed in a binder for the fiftieth anniver- Semitic violence that cuhninated in a been active. Hockey, swimming, track sary celebration. Regarding the construc- pitched battle at Christie Pits." and field, rugby, and basketball have been tion, growth and development at Harbord, Along with the changes in the new very popular with the students, the latter she wrote that the original Toronto building itself came the introduction of the two in particular. Harbord teams have Collegiate Institute was renamed Jarvis St. Rotary System (remember, when the been successful in intercollegiate competi- Collegiate; the Grammar School and Up- school first opened, the teachers went tions and many athletic trophies grace our per Canada Collegiate supplied the needs from classroom to classroom, armed with halls. Interform athletics have an enthusi- of older Toronto as secondary school. their books and notes for each period). astic following as have the girls' sports. Jameson Avenue Collegiate Institute The system of recommendation came into Harbord pupils are learning "to play the (renamed later as Parkdale) was separated being-a student with second-class honors game". from Toronto proper by the railway tracks could be exempted from writing the fmal Harbord Collegiate Institute has indeed and was a separate community. Departmental Examination, and extra- a splendid record of accomplishment and She continues: "In 1911, the school was curricular activities flourished. its proud motto of "Virtus et Doctrina" , added to at the rear of the building: six is an ever-present inspiration to succeeding central rooms were added, the old gymna- It Finally Opened! (Excerpted from an classes. sium being demolished." article by Nick Vitacco) In 1916, the flagstaff of the Elizabethan On Friday, November 14th, 1980, Har- On the occasion of this fiftieth anniver- Tower was blown down during a violent bord Collegiate's new building opened, sary, former principal Colonel Hagarty storm, and later the top of the Tower was ending two years of intense renovation said that Harbord is a school "which will dismantled as a safety measure. and construction. The official ceremony always be given a place of honour in the In 1920, six additional rooms were has opened the third building which serves Annals of Toronto." added at the rear of the school. the present students of this school. This And former principal David Glassey, In 1930, the west wing of the front of ceremony was a once-in-a-lifetime experi- on that same occasion told that "the the old building was demolished to make ence for it is almost fifty years since attendance rose to its maximum of over way for the construction of the new Har- Harbord saw her last opening. 1400." He went on to describe the im- bord Collegiate. The school, as it now This was an important and memorable provements in the then new building: (Ed: 1942) stands, may be said to have day for Mr. Ralph Peters, chairman of Not the least of the attractions of the been completed in September 1936. the ceremony. In his remarks, Mr. Peters new building are the two gymnasiums, the Before the new wing was built there was spoke about the progress of the construc- swimming pool and the most beautiful no swimming pool or official library; tion and thanked many of the distin- auditorium in Ontario in which many portable classrooms had to be utilized. guished guests, including Susie Mar, happy hours have been spent by the staff To be noted (the reader may tum to other former S.A.C. president. and pupils. The unique feature of the pages for a complete account), "a corner- Through endless red tape, three levels of building is the Memorial Hall, wherein are stone was laid at the boys' entrance." government, strikes, delays and endless the likenesses of the two women and the Many of the educationalists on staff at headaches, Harbord has fmally been re- seventy-three men graduates who gave Harbord Collegiate in the early years constructed. their lives in the first World War. have, to quote E. Guillet, Research His- The official ceremony not only opened The extracurricular activities were torian of Ontario, "somewhat greater this school but also symbolizes that, with -2-
  7. 7. HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL strong support from students, community more than that-a tribute. These are the immigration propaganda were all and administration, city hall has been old boys and girls, home to say hello for a justified and even surpassed. Maybe it beaten; but only with time and true effort. minute and then forever goodbye. was magic. All these kids, in the 1930s The same evening, up on the stage in and 1940s, were blank slates without even In a Class of Their the auditorium, a barbershop quartet. It the price of a piece of chalk in their consists of Louis Weingarten, Frank pockets. They were Depression children Own: The Harbord Shuster, Sam Shopsowitz and Sam Sni- and they were Jewish and the pasty old School of Success derman. The latter two are Shopsy's Hot Dogs and Sam the Record Man. The first Anglo-Toronto of those days was neither encouraging nor even tolerant or fair. In by Robert Stall two are Wayne and Shuster. Three thou- the Harbord area, where street after They say there is magic in the walls sand other alumni are in the conga line street of row housing and bad plumbing of Harbord. If this is true, and if many and around the school this night. The had fallen from the grace of WASP believe it, then next year the place will be Mount Sinai Hospital was unfortunate concern, the Jewish immigrants had only overrun with people carrying all manner enough to schedule its prestigious, one thing concrete on which to focus of urns and jars and coffee cans because $100-a-ticket Annual Ball this same night their hopes: the big old school. by then the walls will be dust. Beginning and nobody is there because everybody is It was a school that had already estab- next spring, they'll be tearing down Tor- here. There are millionaires and house- lished a tradition of excellence. Its first onto's Harbord Collegiate. They'll put hold names and people of station, genius, principal, H.B. Spotton, declared public- another building in its place and they'll influence and power. They sing silly ly in 1892 that he intended to create call it Harbord, but it's unlikely there will songs and they drink and they eat thou- a school whose academic standards and be the same magic in the new walls. It is sands and thousands of Shopsy's Hot achievements would have no peer. Spot- foolish to look forward and sunnise. Dogs. They think back to when they were ton was himself an unparalleled educa- Better to look back, way back, and see if students here and their parents were as tor, a renowned Canadian botanist and we can see the magic ... poor as synagogue mice. And they think the author of a biology textbook favored Start with today, a Saturday in June, forward and quickly they set up a schol- in schools for many years. He was suc- 1975. The big old building is still stand- arship fund for the kids of the immigrant ceeded in 1906 by Colonel E. W. Hagarty ing. Inside, it is as quiet as a high school families who moved into the neighbour- whose style was much closer to that of a on a Saturday afternoon, totally quiet, hood after they moved out to the suburbs: drill sergeant. He was an awful disci- save for the creaking of the library floor Harbord today is the only high school plinarian and an awesome perfectionist, which the engineers have said cannot sup- in Ontario, perhaps the only one in all of feared equally, it is said, by his staff and port the weight of all the books. In the Canada, where credit courses are given students. His was a reign of terror but, corridors, it is quiet enough to hear the for the study of the Chinese language, strangely, his methods were academically photographs whispering their meanings both Mandarin and Cantonese. One third effective. Following is the tortured, but from their places along the walls. Photos of Harbord's students are Chinese, one finally humble, plaint of one student, as of honor students, framed year by year quarter are Italian and the rest are mostly printed in the Harbord yearbook of 1907: all the way back to the beginning of Portuguese and West Indian. There are a "Faces pinched, sad and pale the school in 1892. They tell you much few WASPs. There are now three Jewish Tell the same unvarying tale, about this school and this neighbour- students out of a total enrolment of Tell of moments robbed from sleep, hood. They start off in the 1890s and almost 1,200. Harbord used to be 90 Meals untasted, studies deep; early 1900s, genteel and gentile, the percent Jewish. The neighbourhood has Those who've passed thefurnace through sepia sons and daughters of comfortable changed. Let's go back 40 years ... With aching brow will tell to you, Toronto WASPs. They tum Jewish in the We are in the 1930s and 1940s, the hey- How the teacher crammed it in, late 1920s and through the 1930s and the decades of Harbord. We are in the ado- Rammed it in, jammed it in, 1940s. These are the glory days, the gold- lescences of most of the people in that Rubbed it in, clubbed it in, en age of Harbord, the era that has made conga line. Here they are, going to Rapped it in and slapped it in, this place a legend ... school, fooling around, studying, kibitz- When their heads were hollow. " Now it is one year ago. A Saturday ing, blithely unaware that they are build- evening in June, 1974. On this night ing a legend. For they are making Har- Harbord is being told how much she is bord Collegiate one of the two or three Spotton's lofty vision and Hagarty's loved and how much she is owed. It is high schools in this country that will most brain-busting tactics produced prompt noisy in the corridors. It is as loud and vividly fulfil 'The Canadian Dream'. and impressive results. A graduate just vital, as meaningful and schlocky as a bar Come to Canada, work hard, send the after the tum of the century was Week- mitzvah. It is the first time in the history children to school, make them study. end's Gregory Clark, who confesses that, of the Toronto Board of Education that And one day they will conduct symphony though he himself was an indifferent stu- the serving of liquor has been allowed in a orchestras and political parties. They will dent because he was impatient to get into Metro school. It is the Harbord Home- be rich and famous. They will be doctors journalism, his attitude was not typical. coming and spirits are running as high as and lawyers. They will make poor parents "Almost everybody who matriculated they are deep. The band is blasting out proud. They will succeed. from Harbord Collegiate during that Hava Nagila and a conga line is bouncing At Harbord in Toronto, as at Baron period went on to university." This, in through the beat and down the corridors. Byng High School in Montreal, it the first decade of the 20th century, was They heard Harbord would be turned to worked. Exactly the way it was supposed an incredible record of achievement for dust and they organized a reunion, but to. Whole lives and golden dreams and any secondary school. -3-
  8. 8. HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL In just a few years the returns started in this country. had a dry and deathly wit as well as a coming in. Harbord graduates who went It wasn't just the extraordinary aca- macabre appreciation of the sort of on to university went on and on to be- demic standards of the teaching staff that humour which seemed to infect great come doctors, lawyers, engineers, profes- gave this school its soul. Nor was it simply portions of the Harbord student body. sors. One of them was Dr. Charles Best the unique esprit de corps of the student Naturally, it was Weingarten and Shuster who, in a short time, shook the whole body. Rather it was the fullness of the life who were two of the Oola Boola Club's world as the co-discoverer of insulin. In lived within its walls, catalyzed and premier stars. How much of that daring the 1920s Gordon Skilling made a habit organized by freewheeling kids and free- teenaged duo exists today? Astonishing- of astonishing everybody every time his thinking teachers. Three extracurricular ly, it seems that Wayne and Shuster had teacher read out the Latin homework to programs, the brain children of three precisely the same wit in their teens as be translated for the following day. Skil- radically imaginative teachers, began at they now possess in their fifties. The fol- ling would translate it directly into his Harbord in the 1930s. lowing are excerpts from Frank Shuster's notebook as it was read and his home- The Harbord symphony orchestra. Humour Column in the Harbord year- work would be finished at the instant the The first ever in a Toronto collegiate. book of 39 years ago: teacher finished dictating it. He is today Organized by Brian McCool, a large bear Prof: Have you got a hobby? acknowledged to be Canada's leading of a man who delighted in tweaking the Student: Yes sir, I collect bugs. Russian language scholar. In 1925 Louis ears of badly behaved students between Prof: Yes, but that's no hobby. .. Rasminsky was business editor of the his thumb and burly index finger. So Harbord yearbook and he graduated at what-a symphony orchestra in a high and the top of his class. He was for years the school. But this one was special. One 1st Kangaroo: Annabelle, where's governor of the Bank of Canada and his of its student conductors solemnly an- the baby? signature is still on many of the bank- nounced to a teacher in grade 10 that one 2nd Kangaroo: My goodness, I've had notes in your wallet, eloquent testimony day he would conduct a famous profes- my pocket picked. to the power of a Harbord boy who made sional symphony. The boy was Victor good ... Feldbrill who today is resident conductor Then, a year later, Louis Weingarten So the big old school on Harbord Street of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. wrote a column under the aegis of the had already established its tradition of TSO concertmaster Al Pratz was another Oola Boola Club. It was 1937 and war academic achievement when the Depres- former member of the Harbord sympho- was around the comer, so he wrote: sion hit. It hit the Jewish neighbourhoods ny, as was former concertmaster Hyman "In afew years I shall enter the great- hardest. In the 1930s many Jews arrived Goodman, as were most of the Toronto est fight of my life, but I will enter it with on the run, escaping Hitler's ilk in Symphony's violinists. At one time, no the same brave words with which millions Europe, seeking life and peace in the land less than one quarter of the Toronto of others have entered it- 'I DO!' " of opportunity. It was an inopportune Symphony Orchestra were Harbord grad- time. Canada could not even employ its uates. Several other students became com- Weingarten and Shuster, it should be own, and in Toronto newcomers were posers, including Morris Surdin and Lou mentioned, were in the same class in high resented. The atmosphere was unfriendly Applebaum, who is now the director of school, sitting two seats apart and trading and anti-Semitic feelings often leapt into the Ontario Arts Council. McCool, the wisecracks around the long-suffering stu- terrible visibility. In Toronto, job dis- teacher who started it all? He was the dent who sat between them. That student crimination was the norm, from the gym instructor. was Eddie Goodman who would later be department stores which would not hire Not that the music teacher, Allister a prominent Toronto lawyer and chair- Jewish students to the Toronto General Park Haig, was idle. His elaborate full- man ofthe 1967 Progressive Conservative Hospital which refused Jewish interns. scale productions of Gilbert and Sullivan leadership convention. In that same class And at times, in the Harbord area, there operettas, staged annually from 1932 were Lou Applebaum and Maxwell Gold- were beatings and anti-Semitic demon- until his retirement in 1949, were the most bar, one of the poorest kids at Harbord. strations. Jewish parents, who tradition- famous of Harbord's extracurricular ac- He used to stuff cardboard into his shoes ally revered education, magnified this tivities. He directed Weingarten and to plug the leaks when it rained. Today, reverence until it stood clearly as the Shuster on the Harbord stage. He direc- Goldhar is a business tycoon and the pres- only salutation for their families. Their ted Evelyn Gould, who later became an ident of Revenue Properties Co. Ltd. He children, motivated beyond the bounds inter-nationally acclaimed soprano. He had wanted to be a doctor but couldn't of today's comprehension, converged on directed a boy named Philip Givertz, afford the tuition, so he took a course in Harbord Collegiate. although it was student conductor Feld- accounting instead. They came to the right place. it was so brill who felt moved one day to eject This was a typical twist of Harbord uncannily, absolutely the right place that Givertz from a rehearsal of Iolanthe fate. Applebaum, the composer, studied it's clear God was grinning all the while. because he was talking too much. Later, a music in university because at $40, it was These sons and daughters of sweat-shop few more stories about young Philip the only course he could afford. Tuition workers and push-cart pushers, these Givertz. fees in other departments were $150. social undesirables and unemployables, Then there was the Oola Boola Club, "Many of the others who couldn't afford these kids swarmed into this big old an excruciatingly corny and sometimes college went directly into business, " recalls school, rubbed against each other, stuck funny predecessor of Monty Python's Applebaum. "They were well on their way to many things and flew out finally with Flying Circus, in which Harbord students to becoming millionaires while I was still the ability to extract nectar from every- wrote and performed their own comedy in university." thing under the sun. Today they are lead- sketches. The club was organized by a In that same year at Harbord was David ers in most of the important areas of life teacher of history, Charles Girdler, who Bohnen whose subsequent success was -4-
  9. 9. HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL one of the most vital and significant of all. Safer; NBC producer Reuven Frank; Eva Then he pulled a small fmagle. He con- Bohnen was academically brilliant and he Langbord, CBC casting director; vinced his parents to throw him out of the reputedly became the first Jewish intern at television producers Paul Wayne and house. He asked them to disown him. the Toronto General Hospital, shattering Norm Perry; Herbert Stricker, president, And he then gave his address as that of an its long-standing prejudice against Jewish Heathcliffe Developments Ltd.; Harvey aunt who lived near Harbord Collegiate. doctors. He later became head of surgery Hudes, president, Mosport Speedway. So Philip Givertz got himself properly at Mount Sinai Hospital and remained And then there is young Philip Givertz, educated and then entered the world pre- there until his death recently. At least the boy who was thrown out of a rehearsal pared to deal with all its obstacles and eight other Harbord alumni are chiefs 34 years ago because he talked too much. hostilities. He changed his last name to of departments in various Canadian His is the story that tells the most about Givens. He went to law school. hospitals. the meaning of Harbord and the changing In November, 1963, Phil Givens became Among other Harbord graduates were: faces of Toronto. mayor of Toronto. He held the job until Melissa Hayden, prima ballerina, New Givertz, probably more than any other 1966. In 1968 he ran for Parliament, then York State Ballet Company; Gordon Stul- boy his age, saw the importance of Har- for the provincial legislature where he is berg, president of 20th Century Fox; bord and he wanted desperately to be a today. Stephen Lewis, leader of Ontario's New student there, not just a student but a "The kids at Harbord had to prove Democratic Party; Alan Borovoy, direc- member because in many ways Harbord something to themselves and their tor of the Canadian Civil Liberties Asso- was a club, a family, a way of life that parents," Givens says. "In addition, they ciation; Mel Lastman, mayor of North promised both a good time now and real had to compensate for a degree of anti- York, Ontario; Phil White, mayor of the opportunities afterward. In the Toronto of Semitism that was around at that time. Borough of York; Harvey Hart, Holly- the late 1930s, Givertz, the child of a Jew- Many of them aimed very high and they wood fIlm director; Toby Robins, actress; ish working-class family, knew that Har- scored." author Morris Kertzer; Tom Alderman, bord was his best chance. The problem writer, The Canadian Magazine; Louis was that he didn't live in the Harbord Reprinted/rom Weekend Magazine, June 14,1975 Jaques, former photo editor, Weekend area. School authorities ordered him to Magazine; Burnett Thall, vice-president, attend Parkdale, another collegiate, where Toronto Star; CBS newsman Morley he spent a full year. Harbord Lord Roberts Imperial Cadets Harbord Collegiate Institute Toronto, Canada, Rifle Team 1909 -5-
  10. 10. HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL The Harbord Collegiate Institute War Record byAlIanHux The students, staff and alumni of Harbord Collegiate Institute made outstanding contributions to the Canadian military effort in two world wars. Over one thousand Harbordites served in these wars and at least one hundred and twenty-five sacrificed their lives to defend the values that Canadians hold dear - individual freedom and political democracy. The Harbord Cadet the boys to Long Branch on Saturdays to teach them "the intricacies of marksman- Principal Hagarty regularly exhorted the students and the cadet corps on the Corps and the South ship". The Harbord marksmen won a merits of the Allied cause, the faults of African War number of trophies and team champion- ships. In 1910, Harold Heakes won the the enemy, led by Germany, and the im- portance of joining the fight. War evokes The Harbord Cadet Corps (1898-1962) all Canadian championship as the best strong emotions and powerful passions provided an ideal training ground to marksman under 16 years, and he received which are not easily controlled even by promote military values and patriotic an engraved silver tray from Govemor- adults. After an assembly on Monday, spirit. Most of the young men from General Earl Grey which can be seen in September 7, 1914, a fight allegedly Harbord who served in the Canadian or the Harbord Museum. broke out among several Harbord stu- Allied armed forces were introduced to dents, at least one of whom was the son vigorous physical training, uniforms, of the Reverend Paul Wilhelm Mueller, drill and marksmanship through school World War I Professor of German, University Col- lege, University of Toronto. Professor cadets. The first student to join the Cadet Corps was J. Hamilton Adams in Sept- When Harbordites, along with 60,000 Mueller's three sons claimed that they ember, 1898, and he later returned to other Toronto students, returned to their had been embarrassed by Mr. Hagarty's Harbord C.1. as a teacher and Vice- classes on Tuesday, September 1, 1914, remarks in the assembly and that this had Principal (1913-1948). The first Captain the world was already inexorably drawn sparked the confrontation with other of the Cadet Corp was John T. Duguid into the First World War. The Toronto students. Meetings were held between the and in 1899 he became Harbord's first press had covered the escalating Euro- parents, staff and students, and Profes- veteran when he joined the Second pean tensions in July and the rapid sor Mueller petitioned the Toronto Board Canadian Contingent and sailed to the spread of the war " August. Toronto- in of Education. The Board investigated the South African or Boer War. Toronto and nians were bombarded with stories about incident and in the end concluded that Harbord were caught up in the patriotic the cruel Kaiser, the brave Belgians, the "while ... Principal Hagarty may have fervour of the South African War, as advancing Russians, the bungling Aus- used strong language ... in his references Principal E. W. Hagarty wrote in the trians, the determined French and the to the present war ... we commend the 1907 Harbord Review: heroic British. Headlines announced the policy he pursued in attempting to impress creation of a patriotic fund, the flood of the principles of loyalty and devotion to "The excitement in the school on this Canadian enlistments, and the marshal- our Empire." In its editorial on this inci- occasion was intense. A large purse of ling of the first Canadian contingent at dent, The Toronto Daily Star gently money was raised and presented to the Valcartiers, Quebec. Pictures of young reminded principals and teachers that it Captain, together with a handsome pock- men who had enlisted were printed daily. was a government, not a race or a people, et knife. He went through a dangerous (See Toronto Daily Star, Sept. 1, 1914) that was the enemy; all immigrants were part of the war, had his horse shot The excitement and enthusiasm of the invited to come to Canada, to become beneath him on a scouting expedition, early weeks of the war swept through the citizens and to share all our rights and and lay for a long time undiscovered with ranks of the staff and students at Har- liberties. As Toronto becomes even more his leg broken as the result of the fall. On bord. Monsieur Paul Rochat, Head of the diverse ethnically, culturally and reli- his return the following January he was Modem Languages Department, took a giously, it is important for all of us to met at he Union Station by a Harbord leave of absence from teaching, turned be sensitive to the feelings of others. contingent of teachers and pupils, and, as his French classes over to his wife, We must choose our words carefully, he stepped off the train carrying his rusty Norma, and returned to his reserve reg- especially when we are speaking passion- rifle, a mighty cheer told how glad they iment in France as the German armies ately about our personal beliefs and values were to see him again." drove towards Paris. Lieutenant Rochat which may be different from our students, was seriously wounded at Argonne and classmates, colleagues or neighbours. The Boer War gave great impetus to was decorated for his bravery, receiving Principal Hagarty continued the the Harbord Cadet Corps and its first the "Croix de Guerre." The first student "patriotic work of the school" through- instructor, E. W. Hagarty, a Classics to leave the school and join the Canadian out the war. He expected all the boys to teacher (1892-1906) and later Principal Expeditionary Force was Douglas Sparks. join the Harbord Cadet Corps and he (1907-1928). Mr. Hagarty also organized He sailed for France in October, 1914. urged and even needled the older boys to the first school Civilian Rifle Association Unfortunately, Lance-Corporal Sparks join the armed forces as they neared their in 1902 for Harbord students. He took was killed at Julian. eighteenth birthdays. In 1915 Mr. Hagar- -6-
  11. 11. HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL ty was given the rank of Lieutenant- his efforts to inspire, recruit and train served in WWI. We have been able to Colonel in the Cadet Service, and in 1916 cadets and soldiers, Mr. Hagarty made a identify 458 students and staff who had he was commissioned to recruit and train more personal contribution. His son, been on active duty with the armed a new batallion for the army. He took a Daniel G. Hagarty, had been a student forces. Their names appear here, 74 years leave of absence and recruited most of and a cadet at Harbord, and he had after the Great War because we would the soldiers required with the help of joined the Princess Patricia's Regiment. want them to know that their contribu- some former staff and students. How- Lieutenant Daniel Hagarty was killed on tions on behalf of Canada and the Allied ever, in the fall of 1916, he relinquished June, 1916, at Sanctuary Wood. cause are remembered and honoured. his command and returned to his position After the war it was estimated that as Principal of Harbord. In addition to over 500 Harbord students and staff had Harbord Collegiate Institute Honour Roll of Service - 1914-1918 Abernathy, H.F., Lt. Bruce, J. Domm, L. Adams, Fred Bryson, Gordon G., Cadet Douglas, Carola, Nurset Adams, G.W. Bryson, M. Drowned on Hospital Ship sunk Adams, S.J.t Bums, C. by German Submarine Allan, W.D., Lt. Col.t Burrett, C. Duguid, J. T., Capt. Allen, R.F. Burrows, B.A., Lt.t Duncan, A.J., Capt.t Anderson, H. R. Burton, H. Dunkley, A. W., Capt.t Anderson, L., Capt.tt Bush, C., Capt. Duthie, B., Lt. Anderson, S. Bussey, C. V. Elder, G.R. Arbuthnot, J. t Butler, J.G. Elder, W.H. Archibald, E. B. Calder, J. A. Elliott, C.F., Lt. Armstrong, A. Campbell, F.t Elliott, Alex. T., Capt. Asbury, F.C. Carter, John M. Elliott, H. Atkinson, G. Chantler, H. Elliott, 0., Maj.t Axton, C. Chantler, W.E. Ellis, A H., Lt. Bain, R.H. Oark, G., Lt. Evans, E. Baines, E. B., Lt. t Clark, J., Lt. Evans, W.E. Baird, H.t Oouse, Frank Fagan, AR. Ball, G. Cockburn, R. Fairhead, E., Capt. Ballantyne, C. c., Capt. Coles, Henry Falls, D. Barber, T. Conklin, R. tt Farmer, C., Lt. Barker, W.D.P., Maj. Connery, F., Maj.t Farquharson, Ray F. Barr, P. Copeland, A.M., Lt. Fassel, Elgin G. Bartlett, F. Copeland, W., Lt. Fellows, K., Lt. Bastow, Douglas, Sub-Lt. Sg. Corbett, H. Ferguson, G. Bates, E. Coveydur, George, Capt. Ferrah, A. Beatty, E. Crawford, J.P., Maj.tt Fice, H. T., Lt. Bell, C. A., Maj. M. C. Bartt Crawford, M.M., Maj. Fisher, S.t Benns, J.G.t Crosby, Egerton, Lt. Flavelle, J. E., Capt. Benson, H. Crummy, R.t Fleming, A. L., Capt. Bernkrandk, S. Am. Ay.t Crummy, W.t Fleming, G.R.S., Lt.t Birkle, G., Lt.t Currey, N.M. Foote, W., Lt. Birkle, W.E., Capt.t Curtis, F. W., Fl. Lt.t Fox, C.t Bishop, A., Lt. Cutler, W.G. Fraser, A, Fl. Lt. t Bishop, P., Lt. Da Costa, W., Capt. Fraser, D., Capt. Bishop, R., Lt. Dafoe, W.A. Lt. Fraser, M., Lt.t Blair, H. Davidson, George T.t Fraser, W. Booth, H. Davidson, G. W., Lt. Frederick, D. L., Lt. Borrett, K. Delamere, R., Fl. Lt. French, T. Bowles, W., Lt. Deverall, E., Lt. Gale, N. C. tt Bowman, J. Devitt, H. Galloway, G.G.t Boyd, E.F. Devitt, W., Lt. Garrett, Guyt Boyle, J. Devlin, H.t Garvie, F. L. t Bradshaw, Edwin Dill, W. Garvie, J. A., Lt. t Brimer, C., Fl. Lt.t Dillon, E. Gay,A. Brown, Geo. F. Dillon, H., Lt. George, Thos. K., Lt. Brown, P.G., Maj. Dinnick, 0.1., Maj. Gibson, G.A., Lt.t Bruce, Claire Doelle, A. Gilchrist, A.J. Maj. -7-
  12. 12. HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL Gilchrist, J.A., Capt. Hutchinson, Lt. McGillicuddy, J.t Gilray, G., Lt. Hutty, A.T., Fl. Lt.t McGonnigle, R., Lt. Gilray, S. Ingham, W. McInnes, E. D. Goforth, P., Lt. Irwin, D. McIntosh, E. Harvey Goforth, W. W. Johnston, I. G. McIntosh, H. Goodman, F. Johnston, R. E. McKendry, W. N. Graham, W. T. Jones, Eric G.t McKenzie, Archie Grant, C., Capt. Jones, E. McKenzie, D. F. t Gray, H.t Jones, R. McKibbon, G. Greene, C. A., Lt. t Jordan, E. McLaren, G., Capt. t Griesman, Joy, Douglas G., Maj. McLaren, W.H., Maj.t Griffin, S. P., Lt. Junkin, F. McLaughlin, P. t Grove, J. Junkin, I.t McLaurin, Norman W.T., Capt. Groves, H., Lt.t Keefer, N. McLeod, M. Guay, H.t Kennedy, G. McLintock, J. Laurie, Fl. Lt. t Haddow, W. Kennedy, M. McMillan, K. Hagarty, D.G., Lt.t Keys, Lily Denton, Nurse, died McQueen, M. V., Lt. Hagarty, E. W., Lt. Col. Keys, N.A., Lt.t McQuillan, H. Hall, W.T., Capt. & Fl. Cr.t Kirkwood, Kenneth, Fl. Lt. McRae, D. Halley, G. Klingner, L. W., Lt. Medland, F. R., Capt.t Hambly, J. Klotz, H. N., Lt.t Medland, M. Hamilton, F., Lt. Knight, F., Capt. Melville, R. Hamilton, G., Lt.t Kyles, L. B. Lt. t Merrick, R.C., Lt.t Hanna, W.G. Lamb, W.J ., Maj. Miles, A.W. Hargreaves, D. J. Langstaff, J. M.t Miles, H. Hargreaves, L. t Langstone, F. H., Lt.t Miller, A. A., Lt. Col. t Harron, L. Langton, H. Milne, W., Mentioned Hart, M. M., Maj. Lapp, A., Fl. Lt.t Mitchell, Douglas G. t Hart, R. W., Lt. Laughton, G. V., Lt.t Mitchell, J. G. M. Hartley, W. Lawson, H., Lt. Moffatt, W.H.t Hartney, H., Capt. Lawson, W., Lt. Monk, W. M. Carlton, Capt. died Harton, L. Leonard, J., Lt.t Moody, F.H., Maj.t Hawley, E. Leonard, T.D., Lt. Morrison, Charles, Fl. Lt. t Heakes, H., Lt. Leslie, W.A., Capt. Morrison, F.G. Maj. Heakes, V., Lt. Lester, J. W., Lt. Morson, A. E. Henderson, Fuller, Capt. t Lewis, P. Morton, C.E.H., Capt.t Henderson, H. Lloyd, H.O. Mossman, D. D. Henderson, R.1. t Loftus, Harold Mossman, J.K., Capt. Hewson, C. V., Fl. Lt.t Long, J.A.t Mossman, H., Lt.t Hewson, c., Lt.t Loudon, B. M., Capt.tt Munroe, F. Heywood, P. K., Lt. Mentioned Loudon, T.R., Maj. Mentioned Muntz, J.G. Capt.t Hobbs, H. Lyons, S., Lt. Murdock, M. Hocken, R., Lt.t MacAllister, A.W.t Nesbitt, Victor, Lt. Holmes, A. E., Lt. t MacAllister, L. Nettleton, C. A. Hoidge, R., Capt. MacDonald, J. Newcombe, J.C., Lt.t Home, R., Capt.t MacDougall, A. Newcome, W.A., Lt. Hope, C. MacGregor, D., Lt. Newlove, R. Hough, Stuartt Mackem, Wilfredt Norris, L. Houston, E. A. t Magee, Harold W. Ogden, Erskine, Lt. Howard, J., Lt. t Magwood, J.P., Lt.t Ogden, Wm. E., Capt. Howell, H. D., Lt. Mahon, H.M., Lt. Oke, W.V., Lt.t "Hudson, E. Mark, R. Oliver, J.M. Huffman, J. Martin, D. Orpen, L. Hughes, H. Masson, D. M. Page, F., Capt. Hughes, R. L., Lt. Matthews, L., Lt. Palmer, A. Hugiff, W. La Verne. McConnell, B. Parkinson, H. F., Lt. Hume, A.G. McConnell, R.G.t Parkinson, H. S., Lt. Hume, A.D., Capt. McConnell, J. Parsons, J. L. R., Lt. Col. Hume, W.B. McCoppen, G. Patterson, W., Fl. Lt. Hurd, W.B., Capt. McCormack, B.t Patton, N.E.G. Hurlburt, W. E. McCurdy, J. T. Pearn, Fred M. Hustwitt, S. A., Lt. McGill, W. L. Pearson, H., Capt. Hutchings, H.t McGillicuddy, D. M. Pepall, H., Lt.t -8-
  13. 13. HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL Perry, C. V., Lt.t Semple, H.A., Capt. Teney, A. H. t Peterkin, Ruby, Nurset Shannon, Eugene H. Teney, H.F. Poole, C. Sharp, D., Lt. Tom, C.W. Poole, G. Shenstone, A., Lt. Thompson, J. W.G.tt Porter, J. Shier, L. V., Lt. Thompson, 0., Lt. Pratt, D., Lt.t Shortill, R. L., Lt. Mentionedt Torrance, C. Price, C. Sider, R. Tracy, G. F., Lt. Proctor, F. Sifton, W. V., Capt.t Tracy, H. L., Lt. Proctor, G. S., Lt. Singer, S. H. Traupp, R. Procunier, C. A., Lt. Smith, C., Urquhart, G.A., Lt. Proudfoot, W., Lt.t Smith, G., Lt. Mentionedt Van Wyck, H.B., Capt. Quail, c., Lt. t Smith, H., Lt.t Vokes, A. Quigley, H.S. Smith, R.B. Vokes, E.t Quigley, O. S. Smith, W., Lt. Waldron, C. W., Capt. Quinn, E. Smylie, Clifford H. Wallace, H. Ramsey, F. H. Smylie, Roderick T. Wallace, P. Ramsey, Lawrencet Smyth, A.R. Walter, J. Parker Randall, W. Sorsoleil, J., F1. Ll. Ward, D.H Reade, A. B., Fl. Lt.t Sparks, D.t Waters, H. S. Ready, J., Capt. Sparks, W., Capt. Watson, K. tt Reid, George Squires, F.M., Fl. Lt. Webster, D., Lt. Reid, H., Lt. Stagg, Winnifred, Nurset Webster, H., Lt. Reid, R.G. Stark, B., Capt. Weir, Milton Rice, L.M., Capt. Staughton, I. t Wheadon, N. tt Riches, S., Lt. Stein, M.S. Whitelaw, W.M., Capt. Rider, c., Fl. Lt.t Stephen, J.D., Fl. Lt.t Whittaker, L. t Roach, E., Lt. t Stephens, G., Lt. Wilkinson, J. R. Robertson, G. Stephenson, R. Willard, A. Robertson, H., Lt. tt Stewart, W.E.t Williams, C. Robertson, J.E., Lt. Stinson, A. R., Lt. Williams, R. Robertson, V. K., Lt. Stokes, G. Williams S. Rochat, P., Lt.t Stovel, W., Lt. Williams, W.F., Rogers, Clifford E. t Sutherland, F.H., Capt. Willson, Herbert, G., Capt. Rogers, D. Sweetman, K., Lt. Willson, H. W. Rogers, H. P., Lt. Sydie, Erol, Lt. Wilson, W.K., Maj. Russell, R. V. Sykes, A. Wood, eM., Lt. Rutherford, G. C. Sykes, M.C. Wood, E.R. Sanders, R.P., Capt. Tansley, W. Worthington, H. t Scott, C. A., Lt. Taylor, Bruce Worthington, W. t Scott, F.G., Lt.t Taylor, F. Howard Wright, G. Scott, P., Lt.t Taylor, Geoff, Lt. t Wright, W.J.T., Capt. Seaborne, F.S.t Taylor, W.M. Capt.t Zufelt, D. HARBORD FOOTBALL TEAM LATE 1960's -9-
  14. 14. HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL Honour Roll of the Fallen - World War I Adams, Fred Duncan, Arthur J. Hocken, Richard H. Macklem, Wilfred Patton, Norman E. Adams, S.J. Fleming, George R. S. Home, Robert McConnell, Harold G. Perry, Cecil V. Allan, William D. Fox, Charles H. Hough, Stuart McKenzie, Douglas F. Proudfoot, William Anderson, Lou D. Gale, Norman C. Howard, John McLaren, William H. Quail, H. Charles Baines, Egerton B. Galloway, G. Gordon Hutty, Alfred T. McLaughlin, Paul Ramsey, Lawrence B. Brimer, Charles T. Garrett, Guy . Jones, Eric G. McLintock, John L. Reade, Arnold B. Burrows, B. Acton Garvie, James A. Keys, Lily Denton Medland, Frederick R. Rider, Clifford E. Conklin, Robert Groves, Harold M. Klotz, Herbert N. Miller, Armour A. Scott, Frederick G. Connery, Frank Hagarty, Daniel G. Kyles, Lloyd B. Mitchell, Douglas G. Smith, Harley Crawford, James P. Hall, William T. Langstaff, J. Miles Moffatt, William H. Sparks, Douglas E. Crummy, William T. Hamilton, R. Gordon Langstone, Frederic H. Monk, W. M. Carlton Stephen, James D. Curtis, Frank W. Henderson, J. Fuller Lapp, Austin R. Morrison, Charles Stewart, W. E. Davidson, George T. Henderson, Raymond Leonard, John Mossman, Harold Taylor, Geoffrey Devlin, H. Hewson, Charles D. London, Brian M. Muntz, H. Gerald Wheadon, Norman Douglas, Carola Hewson, C. Victor MacAllister, Alfred W. Newcombe, John C. Worthington, Harold Among the 458 service personnel from Harbord were 202 commissioned officers World War II of torpedoes, artillery, machine guns, poison gas and bayonets. including 15 men who held the rank of On that sweet day of victory, Nov- When Harbordites, along with 100,000 Flight Lieutenant in the new air service. ember 11, 1918, Harbordites and Toron- other Toronto students, returned to their 38 were decorated for bravery. Six staff tonians shared the hopes of millions of classes on Tuesday, September 5, 1939, members took leaves of absence to serve people around the world that the Great Britain and France had already declared in the armed forces. Harbord also con- War was the war to end all wars. The war on Nazi Germany. Poland was on tributed four nursing sisters and two of Toronto Daily Star, echoed this hope: her knees. Prime Minister Mackenzie these died in the service, Carola Douglas King had recalled the Canadian Parlia- and Lily Denton Keyes. In all, 75 men "(Children) will grow up in a new ment. Canada's participation in the and women from Harbord died during world, with Europe delivered from the Second World War was certain. The the Great War. Their supreme sacrifice fear and bondage of centuries, and with actions of the aggressor nations had been remains a testimony to their faith, com- vast possibilities of development for widely covered in the Canadian press and mitment and bravery, and a reminder to every nation in the world. It will be a time the voice of Adolf Hitler had been heard succeeding generations that freedom, of reconstruction - for a new interna- over Canadian radio. This war had come democracy and national independence tional order, for a new social order in as no surprise: only the starting date had cannot be taken for granted: they have every country relieved from the horror of been in doubt. been purchased by our forebearers with war. Such an opportunity has never Once again Harbordites enlisted in sweat, fear, blood and early death. before in history been offered to the large numbers. Their experience in the The World War I dead were commem- children of men." (Nov. 11, 1918) Harbord Cadet Corps under the tutelage orated by their contemporaries with the of World War I veterans had reminded War Monument that stands in front of The editorial writer went on to note in them of the last war. It was only a limited the school. George W. Hill, a Montreal the same article that the bands of children preparation for the next war which was sculptor, was commissioned to create a who were marching in the streets during dominated by tanks, aeroplanes and air- statue of an infantryman in action. The the early morning of November 11,1918, craft carriers. More important to the Monument, with the names of the fallen had much to celebrate. young people were the values of disci- engraved on it, was unveiled by Lieu- pline and co-operation learned in cadets, tenant-Governor Henry Cockshutt in a "For (the) children, (their) march in and the clear understanding of the differ- special Rememberance Day service on the darkness will be a memory to be cher- ence between democracy and dictatorship Friday, November 11, 1921. Ten years ished for life, a story to be told to a new learned in classes. No one anticipated the later the school again recognized these generation twenty or thirty years hence. " rapid thrust of "blitzkrieg" or the shat- young men and women who had died in tering surprises of Pearl Harbour and the prime of their lives. The pictures of No one realized the bitter irony of the Hong Kong. And no one in their worst many of the 75 fallen were assembled in victory celebrations on November 11, nightmare anticipated that the Second an honour hall outside of the new school 1918. In 21 years these children were the World War would last two years longer auditorium. On Thursday, November 12, men and women marching off to fight in than the First, and kill 33,000,000 people. 1931, General Sir Arthur Currie, the first another world war. Unlike their parents, Canadian commander of the Canadian who did not realize the horrors of mod- Corps, unveiled the photographs of these ern war in 1914, this next generation young people. Their eyes stare at you understood very well the carnage of with fIXed resolve: their youth reminds us mechanized warfare. They had heard sharply of the tragedy of their death. from eye-witness survivors the terrors -10-
  15. 15. HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL Harbord Collegiate Institute Honour Roll of Service - 1939-1945 Adelberg, Jack Lionel, Army Brightman, Albert, Army Dattels, David R., Navy Adye-White, Stewart, Army Brody, Jack David, RCAF Davern, Peter, Army Albright, Scarlat, RCAF Brody, Louis, Army Davis, Milton Alexander, Allan George, RCAF Brooke, William Osborne Dean, John Alexander Allan, Charles Edwin, RCAF Brown, George Murray, Army Dean, Margaret A., Nursing Sister Allentoff, Norman, RCAF Brown, Hugh F., Army Denier, Evon, Army Alter, Charles Brown, Leonard G., RCAFt Derbyshire, John Cameron, RCAF Anderson, Ryerson, Army Brown, William E., RCAFt Deyman, Jack, Army Applebaum, Benjamin, RCAF Browner, Louis, RCAF Devies, George W., Army Appleton, Charles, D.F.C., RCAF Bruce, David Stewart, Navy Dick, Lionel Alexander, Army Archer, Alfred, C.E. Bruce, Robert Mackenzie, Army Diggins, John Alexander, Army Armstrong, John F., Navy Budd, William, RCAF Dilworth, Russell Nelson, RCAF Ashbourne, John Beatty, RCAF Bulmer, Ed, RCAF Diskin, Morley, Army Avery, William Leslie, Army Byrnes, Bertram Patrick Dister, Arthur Lyle, Army Axier, Davidt Cain, William Edward, RCAFt Dobkin, Jack, Army Back, Sidney, D.F.M., RCAF Caldecott, Stapleton, Army Dobkin, John J. Baker, Vernon, RCAF Cameron, Donald, RCAF Dodd, Blachford, Armyt Baker, William Douglas, RCAF Cameron, Kenneth, RCAF Dodds Bakerspiegel, Alex, RCAF Cameron, Miriam, RCAF Doherty, Donald John, RCAF Balla, George Campbell, William R., RCAFt Donovan, James Michael, U.S.N.R. Ballantyne, Aubrey R., RCAF Candy, Douglas Cleeve, Army Doubt, Ross H., RCAF Barclay, Lloyd William, RCAF Carter, Philip Gordont Douglas, Louis Harold, Army Barron, Charles Lewis, RCAFt Carter, Roderick Crysler, Army O.B.E. t Dunn, Alan M., RCAF Barton, Olive Madeline, RCAF Cass, Eli, RCAF Easson, Stanley, Army Nursing Sister Cass, Irving Morris (Dr.), Army Ebach, John Travers, Army Bass, Israel, Army Chambers, Edward, RCAF Ehrenwort, Harry, RCAF Bassett, William Averil, Army Chapnick, Gilbert, Army Ehrlich, Murray Beattie, Harry Keith, Army Charndoff, Leonard, RCAF Eisenberg, Arnold, Army Bellamy, Horace Esmond, RCAF Charney, E. T., Army Eisenberg, Max, RCAF Berger, Bernard, RCAF Chikofsky, Herbert, RCAF Eisenberg, R. Ted, RCAF Berger, Philip, RCAF Choat, Ev, Army Elliott, John Archibald, RCAF Bergman, John Maxwell, Army Chvertkin, Morris, RCAF Elo, Thomas, RCAF Bergman, Louis, Army Clark, Henry Duncan, RCAF Ely, Philip, RCAF Bergstein, Bunny (Beral), RCAF Oarke, Douglas, Army Emery, John Owen, RCAF Berlin, William, Army Clarke, Steven Packman, Army Englander, Norman Harvey, Army Berman, Samuel, RCAF Oemens, Jack, RCAF Enouy, Lawrence, Army Bernbaum, Sydney Harold Cobbald, Arnold Frank, Navy Epping, Edward Berstein, Irving Cobbald, Harold John, Army Evans, John Robert, Army Birenbaum, Samuel, RCAF Cohen, Abraham Albert, RCAF Ezrin, Sydney, Army Black, Harris, RCAFt Cohen, Albert Sidney, RCAF Fallis, Fred Brewster, RCAF Blakeney, William, RCAF Cohen, Albert, RCAF Farr, Russell Harold, RCAF Blugrind, Max Cohen, Gerald, RCAF Fauman, Earl, Army Bochner, Harry J. RCAFt Cohen, Louis Oscar, RCAF Feldbrill, Victor, Navy Bolley, Hilda, Army Cohen, Murray, RCAFt Feldman, Abraham, Army Borland, James Frances Cohen, Myer Feldman, Jack, RCAFt Bortnick, Louis, RCAF Coldoff, Arthur, Armyt Feldt, Joseph Bowman, Howard (Dr.), Cole, Albert, Army Fields, Albert (Dr.), Army U.S. Army Medical Corps Cole, Jack, RCAF Fier, Morris, RCAF Boyd, Jack Ross, RCAF Collier, Alan C., Army Filler, Chester Arthur Boyd, Victor Leslie, RCAFt Collins, Gordon, Navy Fine, Bertram, RCAF Bradley, Herbert Arthur, RCAF Comrie, Donald G., RCAF Fine, Harold, Army Bradley, John Milligan, RCAF Cooke, Elizabeth, Postal Corps Finer, Nat, Army Braithwaite, James Mark, RCAF Cooper, Sydney c., Army, R.C.E. Firestone, Solomon Leonard, RCAF Braithwaite, Leonard, RCAF Cornfield, Joseph, RCAFt Fisher, Estelle Bramley, Ruth, Army, Nursing Sister Craigie, Alexander, Army, Wounded Fleming, David Charles Breck, Wallace Graham, Navy Cravit, Harry, RCAF Flick, Jeoffrey Bertram, RCAF Brenman, Harvey, RCAF Crowther, Henry Flinn, John Ferguson, Army Briden, Edward James, RCAF Crutcher, Martin Thomas, Army Forent, Cecil, RCAF Bright, Hugh (Dr.), Army Cuttlar, Hymie, RCAF Forent, Sydney, RCAF -11-
  16. 16. HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL Forman, Edward, RCAF Goldstein, Abraham, Victor Horbatnik, Eugene, RCAF Forsythe, Harry, Army Goldstein, Milton, Army Horbatnik, Gerald, Army Fotheringham, Clifford, RCAFt Goldstein, Solomon, RCAF Hrynyk, Walter, Navy Fountain, William Charles, RCAF Goldstone, Mervyn, RCAF Huders, Murray, RCAF Fox, David, Army Goodman, David, Navy Humeniuk, Eugent, Army Fox, Sydney, Army Goodman, Edwin Alan, Army Hunter, William, Army Frank, Harold, Army Goodman, Julius, Navy Hutchinson, Leonard Sydney, Army Frankel, Seymour, RCAF Goodman, Max, RCAF Iglesais, John Henry, Army Frankfurter, Glen Mark, Navy Gordon, Thomas, RCAF Ireland, Ralph Reginald, Army Fraser, Andrew, Army, Died Gorlick, Alex., Army Isenberg, Melville, RCAF, D.F.C. Freedman, Albert, RCAF Gorman, Harry, RCAF Israelson, Burril Freedman, Earle, RCAF Gorvoy, Jack (Dr.), Army Jaffe, Jack Irwin, RCAF Freedman, Louis, Army Gotfrid, Harold, RCAF James, John Leslie, RCAF, D.F.C. Freedman, Samuel Bernard, RCAF Gottlieb, Benjamin Maxwell, RCAF James, Roy Wilfred, Army, M.M. Freidman, Solomon, RCAF Gottlieb, Morris, RCAF James, Saul Irwin, RCAF Freisner, Solomon, Navy Gottlieb, Samuel, RCAF Jarrett, Gordon Hipwood, RCAF Friedlander, Frederick, Army Gould, Arthur, Army Jarvis, Keith, Army Frizell, Jack Grace, Abraham, RCAF Jaworski, John, RCAF Fromstein, Joseph, RCAF Graham, W. Murray, RCAF Johnson, Walter, Army Fromstein, Samuel, RCAF Grant, Ronald Callier, RCAF Johnston, Donald Whalen, RCAF Fulford, Kenneth Roy, RCAF Gray, William Alex., RCAFt James, Donald Stewart Fulford, Richard, RCAF Greenbaum, Edward, Army James, Gordon A. Gaba, William, RCAFt Greenbaum, Edward Israel, RCAF Junkin, J. Irwin, RCAF Gaffon Greenbaum, Morris, RCAF Kandel, Israel, Mer. Navy Gain, Thomas William, RCAF Greenberg, Edward, Army Kane, Jack, Army Gandier, Helen Eastwood, RCAMC Greenspoon, Maurice, Army Kaufman, Nathan, RCAF Garalick, Alex., RCAFt Gregg, Paul H. RCAF Kearns, Keith, Army Gardiner, Stanley, Army Grizzle, Stanley George, Army Kelen, Carl, RCAF Garfinkle, James, Army, Wounded Grossman, David, RCAF Kelly, Fred Winstan, RCAF, D.F.C. Garfunkle, Cyril Harold, RCAF Gruber, Ben Kelly, Orville Earl, RCAF Garfunkle, Howard, RCAF Gruson, Wilfrid, RCAF Kelman, Jack, RCAF Garratt, Meron Mowat, Army Gurofsky, Albert, RCAF Kelman, Wolfe, RCAF Garten, Harry, Army Hadad, Allan, Navy Kernerman, Morris Nathan, RCAF Garten, Sydney, Army Hal, Edward Thomas, Army Kestenberg, Harry, RCAF Gazen, Leonard, Army Halamore, Gordon Ralph, Army Kestenberg, Samuel, RCAF Gazen, Ronald Roy, RCAF Halperin, William, RCAFt Kesteven, Bruce Richard Geffen, Dennis, RCAF Halsey, George Arthur Keywan, James Walter, RCAF Gelman, Leon, RCAF Hamer, Ralph, RCAF Kirkpatrick, Army Gesensway, Leonard, RCAF Handelman, Sydney, RCAF Kirshenblatt, Lou, RCAF Gil, George Henry, RCAF, Prisoner Harenblas, Murray Klatman, Joseph, RCAFt Gilbert, Louis, RCAF Harrison, Morris, RCAF Kleinberg, Harry, RCAF Gilchrist, Donald H., Army Hauer, Samuel, RCAF Klemitz, Solomon Gilchrist, Alexander John, Army Hayes, Norman Dennis, RCAFt Krakovsky, Max, RCAF Gillespie, William Lome Hayward, Robert Frederic, Army Kramer, Julius, RCAFt Giovanetti, Joseph Heller, Harry Kramer, Louis, U.S. Army Glass, Jack, RCAF Heller, Jack, Army Krongold, Joseph, RCAF Gluskin, Max, Army Heller, Mervin, RCAF Kronick, M. Bernard, Army Goddard, Wm., G., RCAF Henderson, Eric Krugel, Norman, RCAF Gold, Bert, U.S. Army Henderson, Milton Howard, RCAF Kutner, Nathan, RCAF Gold, Irwin, U.S. Army Henderson, Robert Harvey, Army Kwinter, Samuel N.t Gold, Murray, Army Henry, Paul, Army Labell, Abraham, RCAF Goldberg, David Israel, RCAF Henry, Percy, RCAF Lambert, Julius Goldberg, Leonard, Army Hertzberg, Peter, Army Lamont, John, RCAF Goldberg, Melville M., Q.c., RCAF Hildes, Jack A. Lampel, Cecil, RCAF Goldberg, Philip, RCAF Hill, Harold Langer, Meyer, Army Golden, Saul, U.S. Army Air Force Hilliard, George David, Navy Large, Alfred Whitfield, RCAF Goldenberg, Daniel, RCAF Hodge, James Frederick, RCAF Lastman, Herbert, Army Goldhar, Sam, Army Hodgins, Frank Joseph, Army Lavelle, Herbert M., RCAF Goldie, Herbert Lionel, RCAF Hoffman, Irving, Army Laverty, A. Marshall, Padre Goldman, Harold, Army Hoffman, Isadore, RCAF Lawson, Cyril Webster, RCAFt Goldofsky, Sam, RCAF Hoffman, Jack, RCAF Lean, Norman, RCAF Goldsberg Hoffman, Theodore, RCAFt Leder, Manuel, Army Goldsman, Ralph, RCAF Holmes, Allen Morgan, RCAF Leibman, David A., RCAF -12-
  17. 17. HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL Leibowitz, Solomon, RCAF Moskowitz, Sydney, RCAF Raskin, Ben, RCAF Lembert, Bert Mosoff, Bernard Herman, RCAF Rea, John, RCAFt LePan Mosoff, Philip Charles, RCAF Rebick, Frank, RCAF Leppard, Leon Bruce, Navy Mottram, Leslie Ernest, Army Rebick, Irwin, RCAF, D.F.C. Leventhal, Joseph, RCAF Mowat, Angus Alexander, RCAF Recken, Max, Army Leveker, James Mudrick, Irving J., RCAF Reddell, John Douglas, RCAF Levine, David, RCAF Munro, David John, RCAF Reider, Irving B., U.S. Armyt Levine, Julius, Army Murray, Beresford Barton, Army Reingold, Max, Army Levine, Samuel, RCAF Naimon, Arnold Irving, DFC Retick, Frank Levita, Harold, Army Naylor, Marion, Army Reve, Sam, RCAF Levy, Harold, RCAFt Newburn, William David, Army Rich, Robert Liberman, Samuel, RCAF Newman, Bert, RCAF Richardson, Gerald, Navy Libman, David, RCAF Nicklin, James Philip Rictersporn, Henry Lilitzak, Eugene, RCAF Nicker, David, RCAF Ritchie, John, Army Lima, Anthony, RCAF Nield, W. Gordon Robertson, John, Navy Lindzon, Irving, RCAFt Nyuli, Lester Louis, Army Robertson, William Anthony, RCAF Lipson, Al, Army Ocopnick, Ben Roebuck, Sidney, Army Lipton, Nicholas, Army Oiffer, Joseph Norman, Army Rogers, Denis Daniel Littner, Nea, Army Olyan, Sidney, Navy Rogers, Samuel, RCAF Lonetsky, John, RCAF Orback, Morley, RCAF Rose, David, Army Lovekin, Eric Orien, Stanley Rose, Donald Worthington, Army Lowry, John Bretton, RCAF Ornstein, Morley, RCAFt Rosenberg, Abe, Army Luckock, Keith N., Army Ornstein, Robert, Army Rosenberg, Alvin, RCAF Lutner, Mitchell Osak, Sam, RCAF Rosenberg, H.A. Lyon, Harry Gordon, RCAF Owens, J. Summer, Army, Missing Rosenberg, Paul Howard, RCAF MacDonald, Clive Hessey Paisley, Irving Allan, Army Rosenstein, Samuel, Army MacDonald, Gordon M., RCAF Pangman, George, Brig. Gen., Army Rosensweig, Joseph, RCAF MacLean, David A. Pangman, John, Brig. Gen., Army Rosenthal, Herschel, Navy MacLean, A.A. Panzer, Leon, RCAF Rosenthal, Marvin, Army MacLean, Malcolm Par, William Russell, RCAF Rosenthal, Roy, RCAF McAllister, S.L., Army Paterson, J. Ross, Harold, RCAF McAlpine, William Patterson, John Frederick, RCAF Ross, Sidney, RCAF McBride, Bruce Douglas, RCAFt Pearl, Edward, Army Rotenberg, Emanuel, Army McCarl, Brian S., Army Prisoner Pearlman, Murray Benjamin, Army Rotenberg, Morris, RCAF McConnel, William Walter, Army Peter, Arnold Edward, RCAF Rotenberg, Robert, Navy McConvey, Carl Josepht Petersen, Reginald Brucet Roth, Edward Morris, Army McCool, Brian, Army Staff Petrie, William, RCAF Roth, Sidney, Army McKennon, Reginald Daniel, RCAF Pezion, Murray, Army Roth, William, RCAF McMaster, Claude E. Phripp, Frank, RCAF Rowe, George Lloyd, Navy McQuaig, Eric, Army Pinkus, Morton, RCAF Rubin, William, Army McQuaig, Robert, RCAF Pinkus, Philip, RCAF Rubinoff, Abraham L., Army McQuarrie, Hector Lindsay, Armyt Pivnick, Hilliard, Army Russell, Beattie Thomas, Army Madden, George Ernest, Army Playfair-Brown, George M., Army Ryall, Arthur Charles Magainick, M., RCAF Plewman, Charles Raymond, RCAF Sachs, Martin 0., Army Magder, Murray, RCAFt Pollard, John Hadley, Army Salsberg, Irving, RCAF Magder, Wolfe, RCAF Pollock, Milton, RCAF Salsberg, Nathan Manson, Maurice Polonsky, Alexander, RCAF Salvis, John, RCAF Marcus, Harold Posner, Benjamin Samuel, RCAF Sanders, William Thomas, Army Marcus, Philip Potashin, Harry M, Can. Dental Corps Savlov, Louis, Army Mayson, Israel, Army Pottens, Maurice, RCAF Sax, Louis, RCAF Mayzel, Harry Price, Sam, RCAF Schecter, Max, RCAF Mekler, Bernard, Army Prior, Alan Thomas, RCAF Schneer, Sam Mendelsohn, Jack Pristupa, Gustav, RCAF, prisoner Schwadron, Leo, RCAF Merrick, Rex c., Lt. Col., Army Pritchard, Ernest Lloyd, RCAF Schwartz, Jack, Army Miller, Isadore, RCAF Pritchard, Harold V., Army Tank Corps Seiden, Max, RCAF Miller, Max, RCAF Proctor, Auston W., Navyt Selegman, Samuel, Army Miller, Solomon, Army Proctor, Charles Stanley Wright, Seon, Douglas Milrod, Samuel, Army RCAF, D.F.C. Service, Frances A., RCAF Mink, Morris Proctor, Henry Archibald, DSO, Army Shadlesky, Harry, RCAF Mitchell, Gordon Loney Quinzer, Sam Shapiro, David, Army Mitchell, Robert Patterson Quitt, Louis, Army Shapiro, Leonard, RCAF Molinaro, Julius, AFHQ Rapport, Louis, RCAF Shapiro, Norman, Army, Died Morrow, Ives T., Army Rash, William Sharpe, William -13-

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