Entire Contents © 2013 Hansa|GCR; Confidential and Proprietary.Experience Mapping:How Do Your Customers Relate to Your Pro...
Meeting Agenda• Why experience mapping?• It’s their world …• Two lenses: Process understanding and processpreference.• It’...
4Our History• We help our clients build deeper, more profitablecustomer relationships by better understandingtheir custome...
Our Philosophy5The brand is the essence of the customer relationship. The brand is a head andheart promise executed throug...
6Why Experience Mapping
Why Experience Mapping?Gateway to the customer mindset. Your processes forinteracting with customers make sense to you—or ...
8It’s Their World
It’s Their World: Through the Looking Glass9Your world ... The customer’s world ...
10Two Lenses
Two LensesImportant overarching questions. Do customers understand your processes? How docustomers prefer to interact with...
How Does It Help?Why does experience mapping make a difference? You may have heard from customersthat your processes aren’...
13Rational and Emotional Sides ofCustomer Experience
What Do You Need to Know?The Deepest Customer Relationships Are Head and Heart Relationships14• Cognitive• Calculative• In...
Customers Evaluate with Both Reason and EmotionTwo things to know about every customer interaction.Following on the two le...
The Customer Experience Is Rational and EmotionalYou provide an 800 number. Your system answers the call. And then, “All o...
17Where Do I Begin?
Where Do I Begin?The infrastructure.Focus groups with customers who have shared acustomer experience.Focus group advantage...
Where Do I Begin?The process in five steps:1. Warm up discussion about expectations ofcustomer service.2. Working individu...
Where Do I Begin?Review the experience: start with thegranular and layer on detail and nuance.An example …20Write down eve...
21Case Study
Case Study: Service InterruptionIndustry: Technology ServicesBusiness challenge: Service interruptions happen—causedby unf...
1. Expectations of customer service. A general question or two about perceptionsof customer service help focus exercises t...
Case Study Step 2Recalling the ExperienceStimulated by the challenge of recallingthe service interruption, customerreactio...
Case Study Step 3 OverviewSmall Group Interactions• Small group team exercise to share and organize theindividual experien...
Case Study Step 3aCollaborationAs customers place their notes on the wall, theyobserve differences across the level of det...
Case Study Step 3bOrganizingA volunteer from the group becomes the leaderto facilitate ordering the steps.Customers discus...
Case Study Step 3c, 3dCategorizingThe number of steps varies, but some steps are universal,and the order in which they occ...
Case Study: Steps 4 and 5 OverviewGetting the Big Picture• Reassemble into the full group.Customers review the experience ...
Case Study: Step 4Identifying EmotionsEmotional reactions have been part of theconversation all along, but this is the pla...
Case Study Step 5Outcomes31See what the customer sees.Gain understanding from a new perspective.Identify specific pain poi...
32What Do I Get?Case Study Outcomes
Key decision points inthe process: A criticaljuncture forinformation fromProvider to determinenext steps.The Total Experie...
Provider and Customer InterractionsService Out During an Interruption Service OnCurrent ProcessFalloutMakeLongerTermPlanPr...
35Rational and Emotional OvertonesService Out During an Interruption Service OnCurrent ProcessFalloutMakeLongerTermPlanPro...
What Do I Get?After customers have…Recalled their experienceShared the experience with a peer groupOrganized the experienc...
Entire Contents © 2013 Hansa|GCR; Confidential and Proprietary.Kathryn StevensDirector, Client ServicesHansa|GCR+1 503.241...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Experience Mapping: How Your Customers Relate to Your Processes

392 views

Published on

Do you suspect problems with your customer experience because usage has dropped? Have you heard from customers that your processes aren't user-friendly, consistent, or reliable? Use a market research technique called Customer Experience Mapping to help you understand how your customers interact with your processes.

The webinar is presented by Kathryn Stevens, Client Services Director at Hansa GCR. It covers:

- Process understanding and process preference
- Rational and emotional reactions to customer experience
- The infrastructure, process, and outcomes of the Experience Mapping approach

The Experience Mapping webinar/PPT also includes a detailed case study example using this method. Watch and learn how to unlock the gateway to your customer mindset.

Don't miss our next free webinar. Register here: http://hub.am/XwTIKo

www.HansaMarketing.com
@Hansa_Tweets

Published in: Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
392
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
21
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Experience Mapping: How Your Customers Relate to Your Processes

  1. 1. Entire Contents © 2013 Hansa|GCR; Confidential and Proprietary.Experience Mapping:How Do Your Customers Relate to Your Processes?(Can you get there from here?)February 2013Kathryn Stevens, Director, Client Services• An experienced qualitative and quantitative researcher with more than twodecades of brand and customer experience background.• Significant domestic and international research experience identifying andunderstanding customer segments and customizing unique approaches tocustomer types.
  2. 2. Meeting Agenda• Why experience mapping?• It’s their world …• Two lenses: Process understanding and processpreference.• It’s complex: Rational and emotional customerexperience.• Where do I begin? Unlocking what the customerknows about your processes.• Case example of how this method has revealedstrengths and vulnerabilities, enablers andbarriers.• What Do I Get?: Case study outcomes.• Discussion and time for Q&A at the end of thesession.3
  3. 3. 4Our History• We help our clients build deeper, more profitablecustomer relationships by better understandingtheir customers and creating a compelling,differentiated customer experience.• Founded in 1979, we are part of a global groupwith 1,100+ professionals offering a variety ofservices including Creative Communication, DataAnalytics, Brand Consulting and Interactive.• We bring research and thought leadership in fourkey areas:• Customer Relationship Equity• Brand Equity• Product and Service Innovation• Market and Customer Segmentation
  4. 4. Our Philosophy5The brand is the essence of the customer relationship. The brand is a head andheart promise executed through the customer experience.The brand is the experience.The experience is the brand.
  5. 5. 6Why Experience Mapping
  6. 6. Why Experience Mapping?Gateway to the customer mindset. Your processes forinteracting with customers make sense to you—or theyshould. (If not, that’s a different topic entirely.) But how doyou know these processes make sense to the customer?• What works—where and when?You have a process that works fairly well, most of thetime for most of your customers. How do you find thetrouble spots and improve?• How do you take a read on how your processesrepresent your business?You have a process in place. You know customers use it,but you’re not sure how well it’s received. How do youtake a broad based read on how you’re presentingyourself to the customer base?• How do you implement a new process?You need to know what customers expect or would liketo expect when they contact you. How do they interactnow—and how do they like the status quo? How wouldthey react to a new approach?7
  7. 7. 8It’s Their World
  8. 8. It’s Their World: Through the Looking Glass9Your world ... The customer’s world ...
  9. 9. 10Two Lenses
  10. 10. Two LensesImportant overarching questions. Do customers understand your processes? How docustomers prefer to interact with you?11Do your customers understand yourprocesses well enough to navigate?Consider a process the customer has tofollow every time they execute a certaintransaction with you.Ask yourself:Can they access you successfully byphone or email to place an order,make an appointment?Has the process ever failed them—how, when and why?How do you find out whethercustomers know all the steps?Potential problem: the customer lacksawareness.What do customers prefer to encounterwhen they engage with you?Just because a customer uses yourprocess successfully, does notnecessarily mean they like it.Ask yourself:Does the initial screen or promptinsist on giving information they don’tneed or want?Does it take too long to get to thepoint?Do you offer options your customerswant?Potential problem: the customerdislikes the process or parts of theprocess.
  11. 11. How Does It Help?Why does experience mapping make a difference? You may have heard from customersthat your processes aren’t user friendly or consistent or 100% reliable. Or maybe youhaven’t heard anything at all but you suspect problems because usage has dropped.Possibly it’s been awhile since you’ve taken a pulse of how well your processes arekeeping up with industry standards or customer needs.12Experience mapping will help you:Diagnose specific pain points orfrustrations.Better understand the customer’sworld.Observe where customers give upon the process and disappear.Learn what the customer doesn’tknow about your processes.Discover where, when and howprocesses break down altogether.
  12. 12. 13Rational and Emotional Sides ofCustomer Experience
  13. 13. What Do You Need to Know?The Deepest Customer Relationships Are Head and Heart Relationships14• Cognitive• Calculative• Intellectual• Functional• Cost• ROI• Performance• Technical• Behavioraldesign• Emotional• Ego• Self image• Social / peerapproval• Trust• Identification• Fear• Aesthetics(e.g., look and feel)For example:• Bargain• Deal• Value• Quality• QuantityFor example:• Reducedhassle• At ease• CoolnessSensory Experience:Taste, touch, smell, hearing, sight, temperature
  14. 14. Customers Evaluate with Both Reason and EmotionTwo things to know about every customer interaction.Following on the two lenses of understanding andpreference is a deeper understanding of how customersperceive and process their interactions with you.• Rational. Understanding the Head aspect of the waycustomers react to a process involves intellectual issues.– Is the process efficient—does it save time, or at least notwaste time?– Does the process save me money?– Does the process lead to a quality outcome?• Emotional. Uncovering the emotional factors revealswhat the customer’s Heart dictates about navigatingyour process.– Does working through the process make me feel goodabout myself and the process?– Do I dread having to do this?– Do I trust I’ve achieved what I need at the end of theprocess?15What do I know orneed to know?How does it makeme feel?
  15. 15. The Customer Experience Is Rational and EmotionalYou provide an 800 number. Your system answers the call. And then, “All our customerservice representatives are busy, but your call is very important to us. Please stay on theline.” Every 30 seconds, customers hear how important they are.Your customer places a take out lunch order online and receives a pick up time. When hearrives to retrieve the order, it’s not ready. Five minutes later, he receives his order andlearns, “this one is on the house because you had to wait.”Your customer goes to the express checkout lane with two items. The person ahead hassix items, a coupon for each item and a debit card that refuses to work.16= ?
  16. 16. 17Where Do I Begin?
  17. 17. Where Do I Begin?The infrastructure.Focus groups with customers who have shared acustomer experience.Focus group advantages.Enables access to customers who have had avariety of experiences—those who havecompleted a process and those who havedisengaged along the way.A qualitative approach allows customers tothink deeply and independently.The focus group setting fosters sharing andcollaboration, highlights differing points ofview through full group and smaller groupexercises.Group discussions offer drill downopportunities for select topics.Stakeholders observe customers navigate theprocess.
  18. 18. Where Do I Begin?The process in five steps:1. Warm up discussion about expectations ofcustomer service.2. Working individually, customers recalleverything that happened.3. Small group team exercise sharing andorganizing the individual experiences.Each team produces a step by step experiencemap.4. Individuals review the experience maps.Indicate how each customer touchpoint on theexperience maps made them feel.5. Full group discussion of the successesand pain points of the process withrecommendations for processimprovement.
  19. 19. Where Do I Begin?Review the experience: start with thegranular and layer on detail and nuance.An example …20Write down everythingyou remember on aseries of Post It notes.Indicate how eachstep made you feel.Group the notesinto sharedexperiences.Working with ateam, place thenotes on a wall inany order.Place the groupednotes in order.Give each categoryof notes a name.
  20. 20. 21Case Study
  21. 21. Case Study: Service InterruptionIndustry: Technology ServicesBusiness challenge: Service interruptions happen—causedby unforeseen natural occurrences and occasionally by theservice provider itself when a planned interruption isessential to service maintenance. What can the serviceprovider do to make the interruption as palatable aspossible for customers?Assumption from the outset: almost no one is going to bedelighted at the way a service interruption is handled—they’re too tied to the base of needing that service. Thequestion, then, is how does the service provider helpcustomers make the best of a perceived bad situationwithout making enemies in the bargain?Approach: Focus groups with individuals who haveexperienced an interruption in service. Combination ofindividual, full group and small group exercises to developexperience maps that show the steps in the experience, howcustomers perceive each step both emotionally andrationally, and the potential for improvement.22The universe:Residential andcommercial customers.The shared situation:Experienced a serviceinterruption in the pastsix months.
  22. 22. 1. Expectations of customer service. A general question or two about perceptionsof customer service help focus exercises that follow.2. Individual exercise recalls everything that happened. Each customer has a pad ofPost It notes. Working one step per note, they write what happened. The rule:limit the steps to direct interactions with the provider.• First I …• Then the provider…• Then I …• Then the provider…Case Study Steps 1 and 2Setting the Stage, Individual Recall23Write downeverything youremember on aseries of Post Itnotes.
  23. 23. Case Study Step 2Recalling the ExperienceStimulated by the challenge of recallingthe service interruption, customerreactions vary.• Most recognize service interruptionswill happen.• Some see a few major events: theservice stopped, I was (or was not)inconvenienced, the service resumed,life as usual.• Some see a chain of disappointmentsor accelerated anxiety waiting forinformation. The need to know whatnext? is very strong.24Write down everything you remember ona series of Post It notes.
  24. 24. Case Study Step 3 OverviewSmall Group Interactions• Small group team exercise to share and organize theindividual experiences.Break into teams.– Start with customers spreading their notes on an empty wall.– Step back and read each other’s notes.– Find the commonalities; group them.• Each team produces a step by step experience map toshare with the full group.– Agree as a group on the order in which the steps take place.– Order the smaller steps within each major category.– Agree on a name for each category.Result: Each team has a draft of an experience map.25TIP: Use handheld digitalrecorders to capture theconversation in each group,tapping into candid insights.3b. Group thenotes intosharedexperiences.3a. Workingwith a team,place the noteson a wall in anyorder.3c. Place thegrouped notes inorder.3d. Give eachcategory ofnotes a name.
  25. 25. Case Study Step 3aCollaborationAs customers place their notes on the wall, theyobserve differences across the level of detail, butalso commonalities in the experience.While not everyone who has had the experiencewill have made the same interactions with theservice provider in the same order, most sharesome common elements of the experience.Groups share experiences interacting with theprovider, offering valuable insight about customermindset.“Why did you call three times?”“How did you know you should call?”“When did you get angry?”“How did you know to find updates on theinterruption on the provider’s web site?”263a. Working with a team, placethe notes on a wall in any order.Photo of randomly placednotesTIP: Have a camera available tocapture a record of each step inthe process.
  26. 26. Case Study Step 3bOrganizingA volunteer from the group becomes the leaderto facilitate ordering the steps.Customers discuss different approaches tohandling each of the steps and explore why eachstep was necessary—or not.“I stopped calling after I realized they sayservice will be restored within the hour nomatter how long the interruption has been.”Customers mention steps they might not havebeen aware of (valuable information for theprovider).“So, it’s really important to call the provider tolet them know about the interruption is?”The number of interactions with the companyand the different ways to interact becomeimportant.“After the first call, I just stay on top of thingsby checking the provider’s web site.”27Photo of grouped notes.3b, 3c. Group the notesinto shared experiences.
  27. 27. Case Study Step 3c, 3dCategorizingThe number of steps varies, but some steps are universal,and the order in which they occur is remarkably consistent.As customers work through this phase, they identify thedecision points—when to call customer service again, whento look for help from family and friends.“By the time we’d waited four hours for the service toresume, we realized we’d have to change our routine forthe evening.”283c. Place the groupednotesin order.3d. Give eachcategory of notes aname.“We had to cancel the plans soonenough to let everyone know thenew agenda.”Category names can identifycustomer pain points.Waiting Around for HelpKids Upset by Change in RoutineTIP: Use different colored notesto show category names.
  28. 28. Case Study: Steps 4 and 5 OverviewGetting the Big Picture• Reassemble into the full group.Customers review the experience maps and indicatehow they feel about each customer touchpoint on theexperience maps.Customers individually review maps from all groups.– Customers use stickers to indicate their emotional reactionto each step where they interfaced with the company.• Full group discussion of the successes and pain pointswith recommendations for process improvement.– Wrap up the discussion with overall recommendations forthe top three changes that would improve the process inthe future.29Indicate how eachstep made you feel.Outcomes.
  29. 29. Case Study: Step 4Identifying EmotionsEmotional reactions have been part of theconversation all along, but this is the placefor customers to focus on emotionalreactions to each step of the serviceinterruption.Customers work individually through thisphase without discussing what they’redoing.In many cases, the same interactiongenerates both negative and positivereactions.“I had to wait ten minutes to get to ahuman. I was pretty upset.”“I waited ten minutes, which wasreasonable to me since the interruptionseemed widespread.”30Indicate how each step made youfeel—happy or unhappy.
  30. 30. Case Study Step 5Outcomes31See what the customer sees.Gain understanding from a new perspective.Identify specific pain points and delighters.Recognize opportunities at each customer touchpoint.Understand the interplay of rational and emotional factors.Anticipate what customers will tolerate and what willmake them unhappy.Recognize the turning pointsLearn where phases change from acceptance to a need foraction to unpleasantness—and how to ease the pain whenit comes.
  31. 31. 32What Do I Get?Case Study Outcomes
  32. 32. Key decision points inthe process: A criticaljuncture forinformation fromProvider to determinenext steps.The Total ExperienceMain Pillars in the Service Interruption Experience33Service OutHolding Pattern< 2 hr.DuringCoping But Concerned2 3 hoursService backTakeImmediateNext StepsAt this time, peoplerealize it’s going to belonger than a “makedo” period and begina plan for their ownimmediatenext steps.People call friends orlook for alternativeresourcesCustomer investigateswhat is involved in theinterruption.Talk to friends andneighbors and/orcontact Provider to geta sense of what isinvolved in theinterruption.Some call Provider tomake sure Provider isaware, look online forinterruption coverage,but many others justwait patiently.Assess theSituationAfter two or threehours, manycustomers begingatheringinformation to makedecisions aboutwhat they need todo next.They check suppliesand consider thealternatives. This is akey time to contactProvider forinformation.ReassesstheSituationWaiting &CopingAt first, customershunker down andendure interruption.Many tap intoalternate sources andprepare to ride out acouple of hours. Notunsurprising, twohours is often thewait time givenby Provider.Up andRunningService is back on andpeople resumenormal routines andshut down alternativeresources.While service is stillout, a big shift occursfor many customerwhich forces them toreassess theirimmediate plan– andconsider adopting anemergency plan.This varies bycustomer, such asfamily needs orplanning for the nextday or several days.ReassesstheSituationDecision makingDependent upon a situation changeLifeResumes
  33. 33. Provider and Customer InterractionsService Out During an Interruption Service OnCurrent ProcessFalloutMakeLongerTermPlanProvideInfo AboutCollectingDamagesMake NewInfoAvailableCollectOutageInfoProvideInitialInfoProcessAutoupdateProvideAutoupdatesReassessSituationUp andRunningAssessDamageWaiting& CopingReassessSituationTakeImmediateNext StepsAssessSituation34Key decision making point Indicates a key difference in customer processContactProviderContactProviderForDamagesReceiveInfoContactProviderforUpdatesReceiveInitialInfoRequestAutoupdatesReceive ProviderAuto updatesCustomerExperienceInteractionsProviderActions
  34. 34. 35Rational and Emotional OvertonesService Out During an Interruption Service OnCurrent ProcessFalloutMakeLongerTermPlanProvideInfo AboutCollectingDamagesMake NewInfoAvailableCollectOutageInfoProvideInitialInfoProcessAutoupdateProvideAutoupdatesReassessSituationGetHomeRunningAssessDamageWaiting& CopingReassessSituationTakeImmediateNext StepsAssessSituation350 1413 25 0 16 9 1 7 18Key decision making point Indicates a key difference in customer processContactProviderContactProviderForDamagesReceiveInfoContactProviderforUpdatesReceiveInitialInfoRequestAutoupdatesReceive ProviderAuto updatesCustomerExperienceInteractionsProviderActions
  35. 35. What Do I Get?After customers have…Recalled their experienceShared the experience with a peer groupOrganized the experience into phases and named the phasesConsidered how each phase made them feel …… the exercises generate not one but a series of experience maps that highlight …Main pillars of the experience, compiled from the maps created in the focus groups.Benefit: You have an overview of the total experience in the eyes of the customer.Interactions between service provider and customers both proactive and reactive.Benefit: You know when and where you can make a difference.Interactions between service provider and customers enhanced with emotionalreactions at each touch point.Benefit: You learn about the interplay of emotional and rational reactions.36
  36. 36. Entire Contents © 2013 Hansa|GCR; Confidential and Proprietary.Kathryn StevensDirector, Client ServicesHansa|GCR+1 503.241.9136KStevens@hansagcr.comThank You!Copies of today’s presentation are available.To receive a copy please email me or MaryValenta at Hansa Marketing Services:mary.valenta@hansa marketing.com

×