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Lecture 7: Participatory GIS for Disaster Management

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Lecture 7: Participatory GIS for Disaster Management
Nur M. Farda (UGM)
2019 ProSPER.Net Young Researchers' School
5 March 2019

Published in: Environment
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Lecture 7: Participatory GIS for Disaster Management

  1. 1. Participatory GIS for Disaster Management Nur M. Farda (farda@ugm.ac.id) GIS Lab. Department of Geographic Information Science, Faculty of Geography, Universitas Gadjah Mada
  2. 2. Outline • Background • Participatory GIS • Approach • Platform, System and Tools • Examples
  3. 3. Background
  4. 4. JUDUL SUB-BAGIAN https://www.bbc.com/indonesia/indonesia-45149379 • There were more than 400 aftershocks • It took 321 human lives (BNPB) • 270.168 people were displaced (BNPB) • Thousands of damaged buildings (accessed on 11 August 2018)
  5. 5. Background • Right after the disaster happen, immediate emergency actions need to be taken to save lives and to prevent further damage. • Social media has recently played a critical role in community communication • Social media act as information propagator that can be useful for disaster relief. • Most people have access to social media. Social media community for disaster management as an option. https://www.quora.com/What-is-disaster-management-cycle
  6. 6. Participatory GIS • Participatory (community-based) research: Engaging the community then helps to produce and mobilize knowledge, while maintaining relevance and legitimacy among stakeholders in the field (Warner, 2015). • Levels of Participation: Participatory research is a trendy topic, but not all participatory studies entail the same levels of participation and engagement.
  7. 7. Participatory GIS Haklay, M., 2013, Citizen Science and Volunteered Geographic Information – overview and typology of participation.
  8. 8. Participatory GIS • Local knowledge is informal knowledge that is developed over time (change over time) and held by individuals and communities based on experience, also will vary within a community by demographics. • Spatial local knowledge is a subcategory of this informal information that relates to the spaces citizens experience. For example, where people feel safe and unsafe, which routes are too difficult to walk. • Participatory mapping is the bottom-up approach that allows the masses to create maps for all, in contrast to the traditional top-down approach, relying on those with the power and resources to create maps that will benefit the masses either directly or indirectly. (Warner, 2015)
  9. 9. Participatory GIS
  10. 10. Making sketch maps Verplanke, 2013
  11. 11. Reality vs. perception A1 A2B1 B2Verplanke, 2013
  12. 12. Participatory GIS (Taufik, 2013)
  13. 13. Participatory GIS (Warner, 2015)
  14. 14. Participatory GIS
  15. 15. Participatory GIS Purpose in PGIS and VGI • PGIS aims to improve the quality of planning through a participatory approach and facilitate inter-generational knowledge exchange and dialogue with disadvantaged communities and their leaders. • Community cohesion and actual engagement in implementing follow- up actions identified in the process.
  16. 16. Participatory GIS • VGI is intended to create, collect, validate, analyse, and disseminate geographic data contributed voluntarily by individuals (Elwood, 2008d; Goodchild, 2007b, 2008; Miscione et al., 2011; Tulloch, 2008) who do not necessarily know each other or have any kin or social relationship. VGI is based more on contribution and communication of information than on participation.
  17. 17. Participatory GIS • VGI is intended to create, collect, validate, analyse, and disseminate geographic data contributed voluntarily by individuals (Elwood, 2008d; Goodchild, 2007b, 2008; Miscione et al., 2011; Tulloch, 2008) who do not necessarily know each other or have any kin or social relationship. • VGI is based more on contribution and communication of information than on participation.
  18. 18. Approach “Triple C Method” Community Communication Cartography Victims of EQ Victims needs reports (social media, radio stations, media-center, website, etc.) Printed maps & Web GIS Goverment, NGO Products via Google My Map, ArcGIS Online and others Web GIS Public Crowdsource Coordination The map works as an intermediary between the public and relief organizations Aids
  19. 19. Platform, System and Tools https://sahanafoundation.org/ http://demo.sahanafoundation.org/eden/gis/index https://www.ushahidi.com/case-studies/crisis- preparedness-platform https://www.esri.com/en- us/arcgis/products/collector-for- arcgis/overview https://ushahidi.io/create
  20. 20. Platform, System and Tools https://petabencana.id https://petakita.big.go.id/
  21. 21. Examples • RS-GIS for Damage Assessment & Mapping, Bantul Earthquake, 2006 • Volunteered Geographic Information (VGI) for Disaster Emergency Response, Lombok Earthquake, 2018
  22. 22. Examples
  23. 23. Thank you

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