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Knowledge Creation with Māori Indigenous Communities to Policy and Shaping Environmental Law

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Knowledge Creation with Māori Indigenous Communities to Policy and Shaping Environmental Law

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Knowledge Creation with Māori Indigenous Communities to Policy and Shaping Environmental Law
Dr. Betsan Martin (RCE Waikato)
14th Asia-Pacific Regional RCE Meeting
Session 2, 19 July, 2022

Knowledge Creation with Māori Indigenous Communities to Policy and Shaping Environmental Law
Dr. Betsan Martin (RCE Waikato)
14th Asia-Pacific Regional RCE Meeting
Session 2, 19 July, 2022

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Knowledge Creation with Māori Indigenous Communities to Policy and Shaping Environmental Law

  1. 1. RCE Greater Gombak Asia Pacific 19-21 July 2022 Knowledge Creation with Māori Indigenous Communities to policy and shaping environmental law Betsan Martin, PhD. With Thompson Hokiana, Ngāti Kahungunu RCE Waikato Aotearoa New Zealand
  2. 2. University of All Blacks
  3. 3. Personal, Political and Epistemological Bridges • Greetings • The context for this presentation is the tremendous endeavour over nearly 2 centuries by indigenous Māori to retain, or recover self determination. This can be seen pre-eminently in the arena of the environment. • My own position is with the National Māori Council. The primary purpose of the Council is to achieve self governance, or self-determination for Māori people. • I will mention an educational bridge – of Maori teaching government policy and law makers about the framework they want for environmental law and resource management • An epistemological bridge – an ethics of responsibility. A multilane bridge: • A relational ethic for interdependence, an ethic with accountability for public good and how resources are used • A bridge across indigenous, Māori aspirations and western approaches to ‘living well with the earth
  4. 4. Communi - University
  5. 5. A virtual Bridge – communities engaging with new environmental law Māori teaching Ministers and law-makers: • About an integrated environment – based on a world view of a woven universe. • About decision-making coming from communities who know the ecosystem context and this feed upwards to policy.

Editor's Notes

  • Mention The Treaty . Waitangi Tribunal as a court through which Māori can present evidence against the Crown for breaches of Treaty agreements. Cases include language claims, social issues and major focus of these cases is in environmental destruction
    It is important to take care in using the term ‘indigenous’. In Aotearoa this does not refer to people who live in the forests in a ‘primitive’ and marginal situation. While the culture of Māori in Aotearoa is very distinctive, and has a world view quite different from ‘European’ Māori are highly integrated – in business, universities, government. There is quite a lot of intermarriage – I have Māori grandchildren.
    While many ‘white’ people seek to support Māori to achieve aspirations for social equity and governance it is not common for ‘white’ people to work in Māori organizations.

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