Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Fighting Global Disease and Degradation of Health Caused by Mosquitoes through Citizen Science

36 views

Published on

Fighting Global Disease and Degradation of Health Caused by Mosquitoes through Citizen Science
Case Study Presentation
Mr. Garry Harris, RCE Greater Atlanta
8th Americas Regional Meeting
23-25 September, 2019, Burlington, USA

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
  • 11:11 - A Message From The Universe? People all of the world keep seeing the repeating numbers "11:11." Discover the POWERFUL guidance the Universe wants everyone to know! ■■■ http://t.cn/AiuvUCDd
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Manifest Absolutely Anything. Discover the Universe's "7 Sacred Signs" that guide the way to unlocking your heart�s greatest desires. Access your free report now! ◆◆◆ http://t.cn/AiuvUMl2
       Reply 
    Are you sure you want to  Yes  No
    Your message goes here
  • Be the first to like this

Fighting Global Disease and Degradation of Health Caused by Mosquitoes through Citizen Science

  1. 1. Garry Harris RCE Greater Atlanta Center for Sustaianble Communities SE Director GLOBE Fighting Global Disease and Degradation of Health Caused by Mosquitoes Through Citizen Science September 24, 2019
  2. 2. GARRY HARRIS, SOUTHEAST DIRECTOR GLOBE What do you know about the Mosquito?
  3. 3. 3 True or False: There are about 3500 species of mosquitoes.
  4. 4. 4 True There are about 3500 species of mosquitoes around the world.
  5. 5. 5 True or False: Both male and female mosquitoes bite humans.
  6. 6. 6 False: Only females bite humans, they need a blood meal for their eggs to develop.
  7. 7. 7 True or False: Mosquitoes don’t have a useful role in the ecosystem
  8. 8. 8 False: For humans, mosquitoes are a nuisance as well as a carrier of disease, but they also play an important role as food for organisms such as amphibians, birds, bats and fish. They also pollinate plants when they feed on nectar.
  9. 9. 9 True or False: The first mosquito appeared during the time of the dinosaurs
  10. 10. 10 True The first mosquito appeared during the time of the dinosaurs. Mosquitoes are known from as far back as the Triassic Period – 400 million years ago
  11. 11. 11 True or False: Mosquitoes are less active during a full moon
  12. 12. 12 False: Mosquitoes are less active during a full moon A full moon can increase mosquito activity- up to 500% in one study!
  13. 13. 13 True or False: Light clothing is more attractive to many species of mosquitoes
  14. 14. 14 False: Dark clothing has been shown to attract some species of mosquitoes more than light clothing. Wearing lighter colored clothing can provide some added protection from mosquito bites.
  15. 15. 15 True or False: Smelly feet attract some species of mosquitoes
  16. 16. 16 True! Smelly feet attract some species of mosquitoes. Why? Maybe because dirty socks smell of carbon dioxide, sweat and lactic acid, but we are not sure.
  17. 17. 17 True or False: Mosquitoes locate their hosts by sound and radar, like bats
  18. 18. 18 False: Mosquitoes locate their hosts by sound and radar, like bats Mosquitoes find hosts by sight (detect movement), by detecting infrared radiation emitted by warm bodies, and by chemical signals (carbon dioxide and lactic acid)- from a distance of 25-35 meters! They do not use radar like bats.
  19. 19. 19 True or False: Depending on the species, some mosquitoes fly more than 40 miles to obtain a blood meal.
  20. 20. 20 True Some mosquitoes, such as salt marsh mosquitoes can fly more than 40 miles for a blood meal, others, such as Aedes aegypti, the mosquito that can transmit Zika, dengue, yellow fever and chikungunya may fly just a few hundred meters in her lifetime.
  21. 21. 21 True or False Female mosquitoes tend to bite smaller people
  22. 22. 22 False Female mosquitoes tend to bite bigger people because they produce more carbon dioxide and lactic acid. The female mosquitoes have sensors for these chemicals.
  23. 23. 23 True or False Female mosquitoes tend to bite active or fidgety people
  24. 24. 24 True Female mosquitoes tend to bite active or fidgety people. In some studies, movement of the host increased biting by 50%. This may be because that fidgety people sweat more and emit more CO2 and lactic acid.
  25. 25. 25 What are 5 things you can do to protect yourself from mosquitoes?
  26. 26. 26 What are things you can do to protect yourself from mosquitoes? Know when it is mosquito season and take precautions! Make yourself less attractive to mosquitoes: • wear long sleeves and pants and socks • Wear clean clothes that reduce the chemical attractants our bodies produce • Wear light colored clothes that are less attractive • Use an insect repellent on clothes and body (20% DEET) • Use permethrin-treated gear and clothing • Sleep in places that are air conditioned or is screened against bugs, sleep under a bed net if exposed to outdoors. If you get sick after traveling, see a doctor and tell her where you traveled.
  27. 27. 27 What do you know about mosquitoes? • Which mosquitoes are potential vectors of disease? • Which mosquito species are present in your community? • How can you protect yourself and your community from mosquito-borne disease?
  28. 28. Mosquito Deadlist Animal on the Planet Every year, more than a billion people worldwide (roughly one in every seven people) become ill and 500,000-750,000 die as a result of mosquito bites.
  29. 29. OVER 214 MILLION CASES OF MALARIA 91 COUNTRIES
  30. 30. OVER 214 MILLION CASES OF MALARIA 91 COUNTRIES • Malaria is a disease caused by parasites that are transmitted to humans by the Anopheles mosquito. • Malaria causes more deaths per year than any other mosquito- transmitted disease. Malaria is preventable and curable with drugs and medical attention. • The female Anopheles requires a blood meal to produce her eggs. • Not all Anopheles mosquitoes transmit malaria- about 10% of approx. 400 species • You can find out which species are important vectors for disease transmission in your region.
  31. 31. OTHER SPECIES CAUSE OTHER SERIOUS DISEASE Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus are two species that potentially transmit pathogens to humans that can cause the following diseases: yellow fever dengue fever chikungunya Zika virus equine encephalitis
  32. 32. AFFECTED BY YELLOW FEVER ACROSS THE WORLD
  33. 33. PROBABILITY OF THE SPREAD OF THE ZIKA VIRUS
  34. 34. PROBABILITY OF THE SPREAD OF THE ZIKA VIRUS
  35. 35. INCREASED PROBABILITY OF SPREAD ACROSS US Zika has begun to spread to these parts of the United States as well. Human adapted - we create habitats they like! Bite all times of day Preferred breeding site: containers Produces 100-200 eggs Can persist dry for more than a year
  36. 36. Knowing where mosquitoes are breeding is important for public health authorities, who take action to reduce the risk of disease in your community. Public health partners can determine if disease is being transmitted by the mosquitoes in your community. You will not be able to determine if a mosquito is carrying a disease, only if it is a type of mosquito that can potentially carry disease.
  37. 37. Decommissioning breeding sites by dumping water from containers and picking up trash will help reduce the population of mosquitoes in your community.
  38. 38. Mosquitoes, Environment & Weather (climate change) Hurricanes? Floods? Droughts? Unusually High rainfall: creates new breeding sites where none existed before. Unusually low rainfall can change habitats can concentrate water into small pools where there was previously flowing water. Increase in proportion of breeding sites in containers. Hurricanes or drought: Both provide new and unique places for mosquitoes to breed. Citizen Scientists! You play an important role in finding and mitigating breeding sites
  39. 39. GLOBE Observer invites you to make environmental observations that complement NASA satellite observations to help scientists studying Earth and the global environment. By using the GLOBE Observer app, you are joining the GLOBE community and contributing important scientific data to NASA and GLOBE, your local community, and students and scientists worldwide. Get the app from your online app store. Then open the app. You will need access to your email to register.

×