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2016 ProSPER. Net Young Researchers’ School
‘Sustainable Energy for Transforming Lives:
Availability, Accessibility, Affor...
Energy is more than “bringing in the power grid”
• People don’t want energy but the range of services it enable:
– Contrib...
Who are the energy poor:
the people of Asia Pacific region
• Home to 23% of world population, contributing to less than3% ...
The challenge of access: a story of inequitable
development
• By 2012, sixteen countries reached 100% electrification
• De...
Many countries, particularly in
the Pacific region, have less
than 50% of their population
with electricity connection
Evolution of access to non-solid fuels
The absolute population living without access to non-solid
fuels rose from 2.8 bill...
What do these trends mean for the communities
• Time and effort spent in fuel collection. Risk of injury and violence in l...
Energy access for people:
the Myths that we refuse to accept
Acknowledgment. SELCO Foundation
• Poor are a monolithic grou...
Empower
•Relate to women
changing their
position in society
•Gender equality
Meet basic needs
•Ease essential
household ac...
Acknowledgement: Kopernik Solutions
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fB9-Cd9rRmc
WOMEN RECEIVE TECHNOLOGIES ON CONSIGNMENT
AND EARN A MARGIN ON EVERY SALE
Results: A journey of empowerment
Participants grow
empowered,
enjoy improved
lives, and have
become a
positive
influencer...
ADB supported JFPR 9158 Project, Bhutan
Zhemgang District
• 300 kms from Thimphu
• One of the poorest /remotest districts
• Economy: Subsistence agriculture, smal...
Intervention Strategy
Community
Community mobilization
Skill up-gradation and value
addition in business
Demonstration and...
Bhutan: Value addition in bamboo business
•Bamboo and cane product development traditional
craft in Bjoka Block
•Recognize...
Electrical safety and first aid Using demonstration kit
Engaging at a religious institution Our team in Zhemgang
Think from the people’s perspective
21
Replication instead of Scale.
Think of Poor as asset creators, employers
and inno...
DO NO HARM: Safeguard interests of both women and men
 Loss of ownership or use of agricultural land/ home gardens/ commo...
Thank you
Community engagement, Soma Dutta, ENERGIA, International Network on Gender and Sustainable Energy
Community engagement, Soma Dutta, ENERGIA, International Network on Gender and Sustainable Energy
Community engagement, Soma Dutta, ENERGIA, International Network on Gender and Sustainable Energy
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Community engagement, Soma Dutta, ENERGIA, International Network on Gender and Sustainable Energy

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This lecture is part of the 2016 ProSPER.Net Young Researchers’ School on sustainable energy for transforming lives: availability, accessibility, affordability

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Community engagement, Soma Dutta, ENERGIA, International Network on Gender and Sustainable Energy

  1. 1. 2016 ProSPER. Net Young Researchers’ School ‘Sustainable Energy for Transforming Lives: Availability, Accessibility, Affordability’ COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT
  2. 2. Energy is more than “bringing in the power grid” • People don’t want energy but the range of services it enable: – Contributing to increased production and reducing “sweat energy” – Contribution to health and human capital (pumping water or provision of lighting to health facilities and schools) – “Security” (via street lighting, back-up energy supplies, or pumped water reducing risks from drought) – “Inclusion” in the modern economy (via communications media) “
  3. 3. Who are the energy poor: the people of Asia Pacific region • Home to 23% of world population, contributing to less than3% to the total world GDP, second fastest growing regions in the world • Huge strides in poverty reduction: % of population living on US$1.25 a day declined from 60.2 to 13.1 in China; and from 49.4 to 32.7 in India • Still, two-thirds of the world's poor live in this region. 743 million people in the region still remain trapped in extreme poverty. • Wide economic disparities • Urbanization at a pace faster than any other region. Asia home to 12 of the world’s 23 megacities—urban areas with populations exceeding 10 million— and accounts for half of global urban population and is urbanizing at a pace faster than any other region
  4. 4. The challenge of access: a story of inequitable development • By 2012, sixteen countries reached 100% electrification • Despite this progress, many countries, particularly in the Pacific region, have less than 50% of their population with electricity connection • More than 90% of this access deficit come from rural areas, highlighting the disparity between urban and rural electrification. • Solid fuels remain the primary fuel for some 2 billion people in Asia- Pacific, contributing to 70% of the world’s population without access to modern fuels • 89% of the Bangladesh’s population and 64% of India’s population • Majority of the people without access are those who are poor
  5. 5. Many countries, particularly in the Pacific region, have less than 50% of their population with electricity connection
  6. 6. Evolution of access to non-solid fuels The absolute population living without access to non-solid fuels rose from 2.8 billion to 2.9 billion
  7. 7. What do these trends mean for the communities • Time and effort spent in fuel collection. Risk of injury and violence in less secure places or humanitarian settings • In 2012, 4.3 million people died prematurely from illnesses attributable to indoor air pollution caused by biomass use.  These are mostly women and children  80% of these are in the Asia Pacific region • 50% of pneumonia deaths among children under five are linked to particulate matter inhaled from indoor air pollution • Women engaged in micro and small enterprises, which operate with poor quality and unsafe energy services Costs of solid fuel use are disproportionately borne by women and children
  8. 8. Energy access for people: the Myths that we refuse to accept Acknowledgment. SELCO Foundation • Poor are a monolithic group • Simple Scaling of existing successes can help achieve energy access goals • Standardization of technology (business models is the key) • Poor are stakeholders only from an end-user perspective. • Cheap (affordable) technology can solve most of the issues. • Robust Technology exists and thus after sales service need not be given importance • Technology and Finance dissemination can be done by the same set of people • End-Value technology is mature
  9. 9. Empower •Relate to women changing their position in society •Gender equality Meet basic needs •Ease essential household activities (not income) •Convenience and comfort Enhance incomes •Allow to produce more and better products •Sell and earn more Solar energy project: What does engaging the community mean Increase working hours (e.g. shops during evening hours) Refrigeration for food production and sale Power for enterprises Pumping water Lighting improves working conditions at home Electrical appliances Make streets safer Allows participation in other activities (evening classes) Radio, TV and internet Energy plus other inputs: training, business development, investment support
  10. 10. Acknowledgement: Kopernik Solutions https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fB9-Cd9rRmc
  11. 11. WOMEN RECEIVE TECHNOLOGIES ON CONSIGNMENT AND EARN A MARGIN ON EVERY SALE
  12. 12. Results: A journey of empowerment Participants grow empowered, enjoy improved lives, and have become a positive influencer for others Run a technology sales business that brings benefits to households and community Trainings on technology, financial literacy, marketing, and leadership to start their journey using technology sales as a tool Recruitment to Wonder Women program With continuous support and mentoring, skilled and confident participants expand their business. High performers achieve Gold Star* status Post-training test Routine communication & monthly monitoring Baseline surveys Follow-up surveys 15
  13. 13. ADB supported JFPR 9158 Project, Bhutan
  14. 14. Zhemgang District • 300 kms from Thimphu • One of the poorest /remotest districts • Economy: Subsistence agriculture, small scale ginger, bamboo works Issues: Scattered settlement, in- accessibility, limited arable land, high infant and maternal mortality, high levels of illiteracy ADB supported JFPR 9158 Bhutan
  15. 15. Intervention Strategy Community Community mobilization Skill up-gradation and value addition in business Demonstration and limited infrastructure support Mentorship and B2B support Align with local government institutions  Value up-gradation in bamboo crafts  Sustainable harvesting  Vegetables  Business skills
  16. 16. Bhutan: Value addition in bamboo business •Bamboo and cane product development traditional craft in Bjoka Block •Recognize need for skill up-gradation (product quality and new techniques): Local request •2 batches of training on Technical skills on Bamboo and Cane Products •Combine with business skills, sustainable harvesting and new techniques •New electricity-enabled technologies •Support for electrification of Bamboo centre
  17. 17. Electrical safety and first aid Using demonstration kit Engaging at a religious institution Our team in Zhemgang
  18. 18. Think from the people’s perspective 21 Replication instead of Scale. Think of Poor as asset creators, employers and innovators – not just as consumers, employees and implementers. Think of end value (4 hours of lighting, 2 hours of sewing machines – instead of solar panels, pico hydro). Think Holistically – expensive product (not compromising on value and quality) can be made affordable by site specific financing. Think Ecosystem not technology or Finance Think Energy Services as Service and Assets – not as consumptive items. Acknowledgment. SELCO Foundation
  19. 19. DO NO HARM: Safeguard interests of both women and men  Loss of ownership or use of agricultural land/ home gardens/ common lands  Cultural impacts on family/society (including increase in violence, alcoholism, prostitution, rise in HIV/AIDS)  Compromised safety and security due to influx of migrants  Environmental costs Equal work opportunities, wage and work conditions Community engagement in energy access: Entry points EMPOWER: Economically and socially  Energy for enterprises and livelihoods (milling/ home based work)  Creation of energy sector jobs  Build capacity to participate, contribute to and make project decisions MEET BASIC NEEDS: Support sustainable, safe energy solutions to ease women’s and men’s work burden and improve access to health services and education  Water pumping  Labour saving appliances  Electricity for community health
  20. 20. Thank you

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