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Isee 2016 early morning session - hk

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Urban transport and public health

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Isee 2016 early morning session - hk

  1. 1. URBAN TRANSPORT AND PUBLIC HEALTH HANEEN KHREIS – ISEE ROME 02/09/2016 Institute for Transport Studies FACULTY OF ENVIRONMENT
  2. 2. FIRST PRINCIPLES  Sustainable Transport?  – the Stockholm Declaration did articulate principles that are relevant to sustainable transport planning. Principle 15 stated that “planning must be applied to human settlements and urbanization with a view to avoiding adverse effects on the environment and obtaining maximum social, economic and environmental benefits for all.”
  3. 3. SUSTAINABLE TRANSPORT
  4. 4. IN PRACTICE – PRIORITIES OF TRANSPORT PLANNING AND POLICY 1. Stimulate the economy by facilitating the smooth flow of goods and people 2. Ensure social equity by facilitating access to mobility for disadvantaged groups (esp. via public transport) 3. Addressing negative externalities in the following order of importance:  Congestion, because it has negative social and economic implications,  Local ‘quality of life’ problems such as air pollution, parking and spatial problems,  Safety (traffic deaths and injuries),  Environmental sustainability such as climate change..” (Geels, 2012)
  5. 5. IN PRACTICE – PRIORITIES OF TRANSPORT PLANNING AND POLICY Noise Reductions Equality Providing for Cars Efficiency Policy Integration Connectivity Economic Growth Travel Time Savings Cost Effectiveness Accessibility Carbon ReductionsNoise Reductions Equality Providing for Cars Efficiency Safety Policy Integration Connectivity
  6. 6. APPROACHES TO TRANSPORT PLANNING  A MOBILITY oriented approach  “Supporting the economy and regional development”  Drawbacks for public health: fast smooth travel negatively affects safety, drives a car oriented paradigm causing more traffic and traffic-related exposures, less green space, sedentary travel choices…  An ACCESSIBILITY oriented approach  “Providing fair access to needs and opportunities”  Benefits for public health: designing compact cities and increasing walking/ cycling/ public transport, decrease reliance on car travel and traffic related exposures, less stressful cities, more green space… We are highly mobile societies
  7. 7. APPROACHES TO TRANSPORT PLANNING  A MOBILITY oriented approach  “Supporting the economy and regional development”  Drawbacks for public health: fast smooth travel negatively affects safety, drives a car oriented paradigm causing more traffic and traffic-related exposures, less green space, sedentary travel choices…  An ACCESSIBILITY oriented approach  “Providing fair access to needs and opportunities”  Benefits for public health: designing compact cities and increasing walking/ cycling/ public transport, decrease reliance on car travel and traffic related exposures, less stressful cities, more green space… We are highly mobile societies THEORITICALPRACTICED
  8. 8. THE DISCONNECT BETWEEN TRANSPORT AND URBAN PLANNING
  9. 9. THE PROBLEM Adapted from: Mueller et al. (2016)
  10. 10. THE PROBLEM Public health not a very dominant aspect in transport  Lack of awareness of the whole range of impacts – attention is political (e.g. reducing CO2 by prompting diesel vehicles, reducing air pollution by prompting electric vehicles)  Selected impacts only in transport investment appraisal  “Action” regarding selected impacts only  Lack of public awareness reinforce lack of political commitment and initiative to address problems  Public health indicators not part of the tools that support transport planning (e.g. SUMP development)  Policy decision-makers emphasise “uncertainty” not “risk”  Not enough cross-sectional dialogue – not enough knowledge/ tools dissemination and not enough pushing for health to be prioritized in the development agenda
  11. 11. THE SOLUTIONS?  A more prominent role for public health in transport research and practice  A stronger link between urban and transport planning, environment and health  Improved cross-sectional collaboration, dialogue and knowledge/ tools dissemination  Emphasizing risk rather than uncertainty  A better understanding of sectorial agendas and perspectives  Simple, usable tools to evaluate and cost the health impacts of transport projects (e.g. HEAT)  Improved public awareness of the whole range of health impacts to influence political will  Dialogue with policy makers Over to you : what else?

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