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CP297 iNTERNSHIP REPORT-Final

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CP297 iNTERNSHIP REPORT-Final

  1. 1. CP297 INTERNSHIP REPORT At SUMITOMO ELECTRIC WIRING SYSTEM By Hamza Boutayeb, under the much appreciated tutelage and supervison of : Mr.Taoufik Bekraoui & Miss Ghizlane Zeroual
  2. 2. 1 Table of Contents Introduction: .............................................................................................................................................................3 1. Overall presentation of Sumitomo:.........................................................................................................................4 1.1 Background: .....................................................................................................................................................4 1.1.1 Sumitomo’s foundation and growth: ..........................................................................................................4 1.1.2: SEWS international presence and locations:...............................................................................................5 1.2: SEWS’s MFZ Organizational structure diagram:.................................................................................................6 1.3: Facility design:.................................................................................................................................................6 1.4. Current assembly lines & projects in place:.......................................................................................................7 1.5 The manufacturing process: ..............................................................................................................................8 1.5.1: Employee training:....................................................................................................................................8 1.5.2: Production line pattern: ............................................................................................................................9 1.5.3 Final products: .........................................................................................................................................14 2. Assembly maintenance/ Electrical test Zone: ........................................................................................................15 2.1 Duties:............................................................................................................................................................15 2.2 A day in the Assembly maintenance/ Electrical test zone: ................................................................................15 2.2.1 The morning meeting: ..............................................................................................................................15 2.2.2 Prototype sample production steps: .........................................................................................................16 3. Electrical Test failure frequency analysis: ..............................................................................................................17 3.1 Purpose:..........................................................................................................................................................17 3.1.1 Objectives.................................................................................................................................................17 3.1.2 What TPS is? ............................................................................................................................................17 3.2 Methodology: ..................................................................................................................................................18 3.2.1 Data procurement:.....................................................................................................................................18 3.2.2 Data sorting:..............................................................................................................................................18 3.2.3 Data computation:.....................................................................................................................................18 3.2.4 Graphing approach: ...................................................................................................................................19 3.2.5 Data analysis: ............................................................................................................................................20 3.2.6 Generated results and breakdown:..............................................................................................................21 3.3 Cause and effect: .............................................................................................................................................21 3.3.1 Cause investigation: ...................................................................................................................................21 3.3.2 Cause and effect fishbone diagram:.............................................................................................................22 3.4 Suggested solutions :........................................................................................................................................22 3.4.1 Overview :.................................................................................................................................................22
  3. 3. 2 3.4.2 2nd Test phase design and implementation : .................................................................................................23 4. Honda Civic Right Hand Instrument Assembly line Simulation.....................................................................................25 Abstract :..................................................................................................................................................................25 4.1 Plan of action :.................................................................................................................................................25 4.1.1 Data inquiry and acquisition :......................................................................................................................26 4.1.2 Model creation and variable input : .............................................................................................................27 4.1.3 Simulation Run specs :................................................................................................................................31 4.1.4 Simulation Run :........................................................................................................................................32 4.1.5 Results summary and report: ......................................................................................................................32 Results summary and openings : .......................................................................................................................35 4.2 Conclusion :.........................................................................................................................................................36 Appendix: .............................................................................................................................................................377
  4. 4. 3 Introduction: The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology’s Industrial Engineering Department offers a valuable opportunity for students to acquire credit through internships as a mean of recognizing the precious skillset acquired in the workplace and the hands-on experience that enhance overall learning . I, therefore, was determined to complete one under the supervision of Dr. Frank Matejcik and seized the golden opening given to me by Sumitomo Electric Wiring System MFZ. Interning at Sumitomo Electric Wiring System , a division of the well-known Japanese conglomerate and responsible for manufacturing harnesses for famous Japanese car makers such as Toyota, Nissan and Honda, couldn’t be less than demanding : I was considered an asset and was expected to provide an intelligible input on several matters regarding my area of assignment . The main goal of the internship was to first gather and analyze the frequency of counterpart/jig failures in each electrical testing station, based on monthly records, identify the trend, and finally offer meaningful directives to keep a tight rein on the electrical testing incident frequency. This would have a direct impact on the length and frequency of the downtime, thus vital to the production flow. Exploiting the advantageous chance given to me, I figured attempting to simulate an assembly line would help directly apply the fundamentals of discrete event simulation I’ve learned under Dr. Matejcik in the real work field. I have therefore included an encompassing the SIMIO model and snapshots illustrating the significant elements of the project. I therefore would like to personally thank Mr.Taoufik Bekraoui, Miss Ghizlane Zeroual, and the engineering department staff as well everyone who has been very helpful and complaisant throughout my internship. The amount and versatility of knowledge I have been able to acquire was extremely valuable and beneficial thanks to the consolidated help I have received from everyone.
  5. 5. 4 1. Overall presentation of Sumitomo: 1.1 Background: 1.1.1 Sumitomo’s foundation and growth: Sumitomo is a renowned Zaibatsu in the history of Japanese economy since the 16th century founded by Masatomo Sumitomo, a Buddhist priest. Copper was what made the company famous , as Riemon Soga , Masatomo’s brother-in law established a smelting business after learning the Gaijin’s way of refining copper. During the Edo period, the company started importing silk, exporting copper and providing financial services. All through the Meiji restoration, equipment and machinery was imported from the west which allowed the conglomerate to soon expand to coal industries, forestry, banking and warehousing.
  6. 6. 5 1.1.2: SEWS international presence and locations: SEWS’s initial success has been promising and prompted a substantial expansion throughout the five continents portrayed in the figure below:
  7. 7. 6 1.2: SEWS’s MFZ Organizational structure diagram: Mr.Laghzaouni Plant Manager Mr. Hinna Logistics Manager Mr.Taoufik Bekraoui Engineering Department manager Ms.Laabi Production/Quality manager Mr.Faiz Finance manager Mr.Ouaali HR manager Mr.Al Mouatassim Renault Project leader Mr.Lebiyed Honda Project leader Miss Zeroual Electrical test engineer Mr. Hassan Assembly maintenance coordinator Mr.Chabri Mr.Hlioui Process engineer Electrical test technician dayshift Electrical test technician nightshift Electrical test technician evening shift Maintenance technician 1 Maintenance technician 2 Maintenance technician 3 P.E Taoufik, the engineering department manager assigned me to work under the supervision of E.E Ghizlane, electrical engineer, managing diverse sections of the electrical testing and assembly maintenance with an emphasis on electrical test components. I also have routinely been working in conjunction with technicians through observing how they’ve handled their duties. 1.3: Facility design: Coming in with preconceived stereotypes about safety negligence, I was bewildered by the focus put on occupational safety and ergonomics. Foam padding (figure 1.a) on the floor to reduce stress on the lower limbs. Colored tape stripes are used to determine the safety significance of the area within the perimeter: Blue and yellow refer to generally safe zones (compulsory work shoes and work coat), whereas red and a black striped yellow bands indicate restricted access to only authorized personnel (figure 1.b). There are also overhead water sprinklers (Figure 1.c). During the training of each employee, safety is always a top priority, as one can tell from the continuous emphasis put on through the myriad of safety directives taught (Wearing hardhats upon entering the plant’s consumable items store as well as any
  8. 8. 7 machinery operation precautions ...). Warning labels and evacuation plans are hung throughout the plant, in addition to having a safety engineer managing all safety traits. Figure 1.a Figure 1.b Figure 1.c 1.4. Current assembly lines & projects in place: SEWS MFZ presently comprises nineteen projects for both Renault and Honda. Being more popular in Morocco, Renault lines outnumber Honda’s. The plant’s product line range from instrument (onboard computer) harnesses, door harnesses and engine bay harnesses. The harnesses are produced for models such as: o Renault’s: Scenic, Megane and Captur.
  9. 9. 8 The Captur o Honda’s : Civic 14.5 Hatchback , wagon and Type-R, displayed below respectively : 1.5 The manufacturing process: 1.5.1: Employee training: Each and every employee, after successfully being hired, goes through a theoretical and practical training phase for two weeks during which he/she is familiarized with the processes involved and jargon utilized. A Global Pika Pika Training center (a miniaturized training assembly line displayed in figure 1.5.1a) allows the recruiters to gauge the trainees’ skill level and identify bottlenecks that can potentially slow down production once hired. The nature of the operators work requires them to remain standing and focused for an extended period of time while paying minute attention to the details.
  10. 10. 9 Figure 1.5.1A 1.5.2: Production line pattern:
  11. 11. 10 Although at first somewhat confusing, the overall production process gradually seemed to be trivial and self- evident:  Subassembly step :  CST phase (Figure 1.5.2a): The manufacturing reels of lead wires supplied by a local multinational company called Coficabe are first cut by an automated Komax machine into smaller lengths varying upon the specifications of the clients, the wire is striped and a metallic terminal is crimped on each of its ends.  Sub phase: manual crimping of the terminals on each end of the wire, generally done on longer wires after being cut in the CST phase or wires that require specific manual handling.  Splice phase : ultrasonic soldering of certain wires, contingent on the reference number ( I.e. : Some wires will be used as singles while others as double, triples, quadruples…etc. ) ` Figure 1.5.2a The wires are then stored in separate carts (figure 1.5.2b): Honda's and Renault's. The differentiation is made since substantial discrepancy in the methods of production and testing contingent upon careful terms made by the clients.
  12. 12. 11 Figure 1.5.2b The carts carry wire bundles that are then manipulated in the “preblocks” (Figure 1.5.2c), where each wire is inserted in a connectors (Figure 2.b) following an efficient diagram and creative CPG that limits energy and time waste. Figure 1.5.2c CPGs, short for Compact Point Guides (Figure 1.5.2d): Amazed I was at how this fairly easy to make apparatus can be a tremendous visual aid. The system is composed of trays each containing a specific set of wires, each tray also comprises an LED. The CPGs are programmed to turns the LEDs on corresponding to the sequence of assembly. This almost miraculous mechanism speeds up the kitting procedure as employees only have to visually interact with the mounting block and place the wire in the lite up tray in the equivalent lite up connector , as soon as the wire is securely clasped , the following tray lights up and so on and so forth . These "preblocks" then feed Lay-up operators who assemble different sets of wires on a carousel (Figure 1.5.2d), a kind of a horizontally revolving conveyor belt, in a predetermined sequence. A board plot laid on each carousel plank guides each operator during the assembly.
  13. 13. 12 Figure 1.5.2d Once the harness is fully developed, it undergoes a clip test (Figure 1.5.2e), where plastic fasteners functioning as clips are clasped on the harness with a tie wrap and tested for quality insurance. These clips will later be fitted in various sockets and serve the purpose of fixing the harness to the car body. As soon as the harness is finalized, it then advances to a final test before packaging. The connectors of the harness are firmly placed on counterparts/jigs, which act like switches (Figure 1.5.2f). The operator, proceeds to scan labels of the harness for traceability concerns as is the case in the clip test. The computer then runs current in the counterparts and either vacuums the air within the harness or blows air against dummy plugs. Pressure is tested for 30-70 mbars and current for 12 V / 1 mA .
  14. 14. 13 Figure 1.5.2e Figure 1.5.2f Once both tests are conclusively successful, the tested harness then is examined carefully by comparators and auditors. The harness is ultimately ready to be packed and shipped.
  15. 15. 14 1.5.3 Final products:
  16. 16. 15 2. Assembly maintenance/ Electrical test Zone: 2.1 Duties:  Monitoring workflow in R-Cabin, RH instrument, and Driver Assistant as well as Renault assembly lines.  Handling machine failures and incidents , comprising but not limited to connector pin damage , defective or damaged counterparts , faulty test racks , stripped wires connecting test racks to counterparts , malfunctioning c5 cards, etc…  Reporting under a log each incident, its start and end time, its description as well as the name of the technician. Minute attention should be allocated to this process for traceability concern.  Repairing flawed parts and keeping an adequate inventory of spare parts to reduce downtime.  Creating graphs and Pareto charts to oversee the frequency of failures of each and every counterpart as well as pin replacements. Later used in decision-making, these graphs enable us to accurately conclude which are to be replaced (i.e.: Higher frequency of failures due to a specific connector raises a red flag and may require replacement soon).  Signing board approval forms for each reference of harnesses producing, after the process and quality engineers have both signed it off. These forms are hung on each clip test station, electrical test station, and Lay-up boards. Documentation and paperwork are critical to  Ensure every apparatus and piece of equipment carries an identification label, a preventive maintenance tag and an incident sheet stack.  Check printer ribbons and replace them when in need.  Completing routine preventive maintenance on a regular and rotating basis such as carousel lay-up boards in January, Renault Preblocks in February, Honda Electrical test boards in March , and so on.. 2.2 A day in the Assembly maintenance/ Electrical test zone: 2.2.1 The morning meeting: A typical workday at SEWS MFZ’s engineering department starts off by a morning meeting under the guidance of P.E Taoufik, taking turns counter-clockwise voicing each other's concerns. Following a quick summary of the leading complications, the plant has faced the day before, focal news is announced. For instance, on the June 15th , an order made by Toyota: this was a breath of fresh air and a weighty index reflective of the solid reputation of this particular branch, fostering the already established trust with the headquarters. the electrical engineering team was assigned to ultimately order and implement the GPS , USB and HDMI ports counterparts for the continuity and waterproof testing for the latest Civic Type -R 15.5 , a much more sporty and stylish version of the regular civic : flashier LED headlights , a more robust 1.8L engine , adaptive driving modes
  17. 17. 16 in addition to a more technologically advanced Infotainment center , think Information and Entertainment combined ( HDMI , USB Ports , Bluetooth connections ) , all connected to four screens . Major changes to the counterparts will be carried out specifically for that model, as thirteen more connectors will be tested. 2.2.2 Prototype sample production steps: i. Drawings of the major wiring prototype components are sent by the client (Honda in this instance), which are then revised by the HSI and formatted to match the plant's assembly requirements. The head office then hands over the drawing to the division handling the order. Once that happens, the engineering department, in conjunction with logistics, establishes a plan of action and appoints a specific set of duties to the conforming team ( i.e. : Engineering to electrical testing team, lead cutting "CST" , splice to process team , etc… ) . ii. Adjustments are then made by each team in a consolidated manner to ensure utmost standards of traceability, compatibility and optimized utilization of resources are sustained: The Process team was in charge of constructing lay-up boards for carousel assembly, while the electrical testing team worked on the addition of ten new jigs/counterparts in the R-cabin line, which also needed two more C5 cards on the EMDEP Test racks. Typically, new models do usually present recently add-ons to attract the final customer's attention to the added value of the model and increasing its marketability. To cope with the aforementioned hurdle, the team has decided to mount two more cards before the newly ordered test racks arrived. The spare test rack turned out to be faulty at first, but eventually was repaired so that by the time the new test rack was delivered, it would solely serve as the new spare test rack.
  18. 18. 17 3. Electrical Test failure frequency analysis: 3.1 Purpose: 3.1.1 Objectives The underlying reason behind addressing the concern of electrical test failure frequency consists in how detrimental it is to the production flow. Over 60% of the downtime is related directly to electrical testing failure, comprising both hardware and software errors. SEWS MFZ is a firm believer of production optimization and lean manufacturing and has founded its very own TPS systems. 3.1.2 What TPS is? TPS stands for Total Production System, the rational research of production to exclude waste. The concept and philosophy of total production system is a derivative of the Toyota Production System. The Toyota Production System is synonymous with lean manufacture and its overall goal is to maximize the value by eliminating waste. We must remember that TPS defines that all manufacturing activities are divided into adding value or creating waste and that ultimate goal of TPS is to maximize the value of the product by eliminating waste and provide the exact quantity, with the exact quality, exactly when to costumer wants the products.  Launch of TPS : TPS was launched at the Orastie site during October 2006 in attendance at the event were TPS team which included people from Poland, Romania, Slovakia, UK and personnel from the Orastie site. The aim of the event was to outline the philosophies, policies and the defined action plan for the TPS activities. Also, during the event an initial focus was communicated which helped to promote and outline the opportunities for improvement of production: 1. Reduction of the number of steps at the assembling section 2. Omission of the non-value-additional works based on improvements. 3. Set-up a progression control board to understand the cycle times of production. 4. Operate a system to stop the line without hesitation. 5. Training of operators to become multi-skilled for on line operation.
  19. 19. 18 Strive for manufacturing excellence: Communicating the TPS policy during its launch provided the whole company with the focus to ensure everyone can strive to achieve manufacturing excellence. Global production system: At the heart of any production system are the employees who manufacture the core products made for the clients. This endows them with a technical knowledge within the production system, a valuable asset that must be "tapped into ". This is where the importance of involving every single element of production emerges: TPS encourages that to help develop employees' analytical skills. Armed with a sharp sense of analysis, employees are then able to easily identify the areas of waste and aid in creating viable solutions. Error-Proofing: Preventing errors from happening rather than producing waste and therefore spending, time money and effort to correct them after they occur is a question of using common sense rather than using expensive technology. Poka-Yoke, or mistake-proofing in Japanese, involves the redesign of equipment, processes and facilities to prevent from occurring or moving on to the next step. It This is truly one, among many, way of eliminating waste through reducing defects. TPS's areas of impact can range from inventory, processes, re-work, overproduction, motion , material movement and waiting .In short, error-proofing aims to eliminate any activity that does not add value. 3.2 Methodology: 3.2.1 Data procurement: In an attempt to accurately gather the frequency of incidents corresponding to each jig/counterpart in the electrical testing board, I had to get my hands on the incident logs of the two Honda electrical testing stations (Figure 3.a). I then proceeded to compare the incidents in the report notebook the maintenance preserves for the sake of verification. 3.2.2 Data sorting: The incidents are then sorted by jig reference number. 3.2.3 Data computation:
  20. 20. 19 For each jig, each incident involving it was tallied. Yet , a critical analysis of each individual incident is required to ensure the problem lies in the jig, as an error in the jig isn’t necessarily indicative of its defectiveness : there’s a myriad of breadboards and pins connected to the test cards mounted on the test racks, one cannot automatically assume the jig is the source of the defect. 3.2.4 Graphing approach: I opted for a monthly histogram comprising the number of failures of each jig on the y-axis and color labelled the jigs, as shown in the January histogram below ( February’s, March’s, April’s and May’s are further shown in the Appendix) :
  21. 21. 20 3.2.5 Data analysis: In order to efficiently tackle the issue, the below process flow was constructed: Sorting Jig failures by highest to lowest for each month numerical comparison of monthly failures of individual jigs Spotting jigs recurrently failing over a five month span Identifying jig failure upsurges for each connector Confirming both trends Selecting the jig with highest number of most reccurent failures
  22. 22. 21 3.2.6 Generated results and breakdown: Jig Sub_JB4 (Figure 3.d) failed more than 2.5 times on an average in January, March and May. Oddly enough, its failure trend pattern seems to follow a month on /month off cycle, as illustrated in the graph below: 3.3 Cause and effect: 3.3.1 Cause investigation: I naturally referred to the electrical testing maintenance technicians to inquire about what can possibly cause SUBJB4 to fail repeatedly. Following a discussion with both assembly maintenance clerks and electric test technicians, it was revealed to me the SUBJB_4 jig undergoes a continuity and a cover/clip detection test. The first stage usually doesn’t present any concerns other than cover lack errors. These are often due to the cover (figure 4.a), not fitting correctly as it’s manually cut here in the plant which doesn’t always guarantee a picture perfect cover. It serves as a frame to hold the connectors together (Figure 4.b). 0 1 2 3 4 5 January February March April May Sub JB_4 Monthly Failure occurences
  23. 23. 22 Several other factors come into play, such as the vertical positioning of the jig condemns the operator to remain holding the harness connector up throughout the test. That, puts superfluous stress on the wires which can be damaging. The harness is also fairly heavy, thus furthering the complications. Another critical cause is the stripping of the wires connecting the jig to the breadboards. Responsible for that is the frequent movement and friction of the SUBJB_4 jig. It goes without mentioning that, although rarely does it happen, operators can damage detection pins mounted on the jig by forcing the connector in the jig socket/cavity. 3.3.2 Cause and effect fishbone diagram: SUBJB_4 failureJig wires stripping 3.4 Suggested solutions : 3.4.1 Overview : To comprehensively remedy the issue at hand, we must punt an emphasis on the primary cause first and thoroughly examine the realm of possibilities of solutions available. This is because it has a direct impact on the test’s outcome.
  24. 24. 23 As far as jig wires stripping is concerned , one would assume tapping the wires and clustering them with a protection tube would put an end to jig wires stripping (Figue 4.c ) . Unfortunately , one couldn’t be any more wrong : as trivial and self –evident as it is, the maintenance team has already attempted that, in vain . Figure (4.c) Wire tape and protection tube I have also thought of rearranging the whole electrical test board jig and conveniently secure each jig in a way that doesn’t require the operator to move the jigs. Smart space utilization is key and is conducive of safety friendly work practices. Although the jig board layout is done internally, which enables the test and process engineers ,working in conjunction, to modify the jigs placement, production cannot be stopped to alter the board layout as time consuming as it is. Another viable option is to add an elevated platform/ shelf fixture that permit to move the jig closer to the center of the board thus eliminating the need to hyperextend the wires connecting the jig to the breadboards. Two major drawbacks come to play though : shortness of the harness cord and space restriction. The only remaining compelling solution is to create a second test phase where only SUBJB connectors ought to be tested for both continuity and cover & clip detection. The operator can therefore remove all connectors from the jigs after the first phase of the test and insert the 3.4.2 2nd Test phase design and implementation : Procedure :
  25. 25. 24  2nd Test phase addition in the program: Consisting of adding a 2nd phase completely dedicated to testing SUBJB connectors only for continuity and airtightness. This phase would be next after a successful 1st test phase and dedicated entirely to SUBJB connectors, the operator will therefore move plug the harness SUBJB connectors into the fixed SUBJB jigs , thus eliminating any risk of wire stripping of the jigs . After contacting the technician overseeying the programming side of electrical testing, I was told it was feasible in a short period of time. EMDEP, the Test rack manufacturer, has developed its very own Windows User Interface called WINTESTEM based on VBS scripts. The programmer can then edited the script and tailored it to his needs. A request for proposal is usally required before the process is initialized though.  Testing : This step revolves around compiling the VBS script successfully , testing 5 Master harnesses ( exemplary harnesses used as a reference ) conclusively, and validating the test outcome with both the Quality and Engineering Department.  Implementation : The Final step of the project, consisting of utilizing the test for mass production. No further training of the technicians is required as far as maintenance is concerned . 2nd Test phase addition in the program Testing Implementation
  26. 26. 25 Execution : After consulting with Miss. Ghizlane Zeroual, I was told the Honda line was to be transferred altogether soon enough to a SEWS plant in Romania, and that there would be no benefit associated with developing a 2nd test phase under the current circumstances, regrettably. Outcome: Far from eventually being a simple component of the plant’s risk management strategy, the project ought to be used as model to follow in order to reduce downtime and remedy critical points responsible for it. Working on the project has been an enriching experience and I am both vividly and positively enthusiastic about the way the Romanian branch will handle the issue I worked on and comparatively assess the quality of my work. 4. Honda Civic Right Hand Instrument Assembly line Simulation Abstract : In an attempt to gauge my discrete event simulation skills and seizing the valuable opportunity SEWS MFZ has given me, I deemed worthy to model the Honda Civic Right Hand Instrument assembly line on SIMIO and summarize the results obtained. 4.1 Plan of action : Results summary and report Simulation run Model creation and variable input Data inquiry and acquisition
  27. 27. 26 4.1.1 Data inquiry and acquisition : I was advised to seek help from the work study technician, who has been very collaborative and helpful. To commence the simulation, I needed to get my hands on the Honda Civic RH instrument line plan , which laid out the arrangement of the assembly line ( figure below ). With that in posession, all I needed was a Time sheet comprising each operator’s recorded time of the task completed . the sheet also sorted out the minimum, average and maximum time of each operator in each preblocks . This would be translated in SIMIO language to the processing time of each station in the assembly line , in a Random Triangular distribution .
  28. 28. 27 4.1.2 Model creation and variable input : The model is composed of the following elements :  Two sources : a Kitter supplying the preblocks with wire bundles everytime one goes missing. The SRS trolley holds the airbag wire needed to be the first component of the harness. The arrival mode is not exponential or poisson, rather on event. The trigger event name I set up was Input@Packing.Exited.,
  29. 29. 28 with an event count of 1 and 1 entity per arrival as illustrated below. Side note : 75 entities is the number of harnesses that are planned to be produced during a shift .  Fifteen Preblocks as servers , with each server’s processing time being Random Triangular ( Min Time is the Min time recorded by Work study technician in Time Sheet, and similarly for Average and Max Time) .
  30. 30. 29  A carousel (displayed below), composed of : o Thirteen “Lay-Up” boards , as combiners , following the sequence provided on the line plan. The equivalent sequence table was created as follows : o Seven Final assembly boards as servers following no definite sequence . Carousel animation  A clip Test table
  31. 31. 30  A comparison station where harnesses are deemed compliant or not . In the event where the harness is deemed noncompliant , it is then transferred to a rework station . Else, the harness moves on to undergo the electrical test wherein it’s either validated or rejected to be reworked. I thereby created a transfer node and two connectors hooking up the comparison and electrical test output to the rework. I was told from the quality department, 10 out of 460 harnesses produced are defective, 70% of those are called off after failing electrical testing, the remaining 30% after comparison. I therefore modified the selection weight of each connector to reflect the percentages aforementioned.
  32. 32. 31 Furthermore, electrical testing boards are bound to failing, which is to be taken into account in the reliability logic section :  A packing station ( sink) where the final product is packed. 4.1.3 Simulation Run specs : Above is a screenshot of the finalized model. All what was left to complete is the schedule of the operators, which is composed of three 8-hours shifts, running 24/6 starting at 8 am . The simulation
  33. 33. 32 Assumptions made : 1. All stations but electrical testing operate continuously with no downtime. 2. No absence of the operators 3. No issues with wire bundles supply from CST phase 4. 75 harnesses were to be produced throughout the 24 hr period. 4.1.4 Simulation Run : The model was run for 24 hours, equal to a whole workday , as well as three scenarios of a 100, 250 and 500 replications respectively. Three responses, at confidence level of 95% were generated to be tracked throughout the three scenarios of the experiment : average downtime of Electrical test boards, number of occurences of these failures , maximum downtime as well. 4.1.5 Results summary and report: Below is the design rubric of the experiment, containing the three responses that mostly sparked our interest:
  34. 34. 33 From the chart above and concerning the Honda Civic Right Hand instrument line , one can determine the expected average downtime is around 1.18 hours per 24 hours , the number of failure occurences seems to be converging to 7 per 24 hours and the maximum failure time around 2.105 hours a day.
  35. 35. 34 SMORES Plot of the average downtime Experiment
  36. 36. 35 SMORES plot of the Average Failure occurrences Results summary and openings: The responses generated were fairly equal to the actual experienced failure occurrences and average downtime. Prospectively speaking, the simulation parameters can be modified in numerous ways to attain a target, such as minimizing the average downtime thus increasing the uptime for instance. The model offers a cost effective, holistic and realistic approach to evaluating the efficiency of an optimization plan without incurring any risk associated with the actual implementation. Several scenarios can simulate the quantity reworked by modifying the selection weight of the connectors going into the rework stations, changing the speed at which the carousel is revolving, adding another electrical test station as a backup in the event of a
  37. 37. 36 failure, etc… and generate responses from there. 4.2 Conclusion : From a learnability standpoint, this internship was my first exposure to the real of automotive design and wiring harness manufacturing. Interning at a prestigious and renowned corporate the caliber of SEWS was certainly a fascinating experience that sharpened the set of skills SDSMT armed me with throughout my curriculum. Fruitful and enjoyable , I never felt forced to do anything against my will and was always encouraged to establish my own schedule in conjunction with Miss Ghizlane Zeroual. I take advantage of the opportunity one more time to thank her for her much needed assistance. Coming in with very limited knowledge as to wiring harnesses, I now can firmly understand how critical, physically and mentally demanding it is to maintain the highest standards of exemplary continuous production. Customer satisfaction is a top priority and securing the delivery of the product from the production side to logistics under a time constraint puts tremendous stress on all the staff. It’s almost astounding to see how well the employees are performing their tasks under excellent managerial directives.
  38. 38. 37 Appendix: This segment of the document comprises pictures of different apparatus relevant to the electrical test board Electrical test rack:
  39. 39. 38 Counterpart /Jig Breadboards connecting jigs to test racks:
  40. 40. 39
  41. 41. 40 Monthly jigs failure occurrences of the Honda Civic RH instrument line:  February’s
  42. 42. 41  March’s  April’s :
  43. 43. 42  May’s :

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