The leadership of the provisional government

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The leadership of the provisional government

  1. 1. The leadership of the Provisional Government<br /><ul><li>When the Provisional Government was formed Prince Lvov was appointed Prime Minister.He was supposed to rule Russia until the Constituent Assembly (the new government) was elected at the end of 1917.
  2. 2. The Provisional Government occupied one end of the Tauride Palace.
  3. 3. The leaders of the Petrograd Soviet met at the other end.
  4. 4. The Petrograd Soviet chose its members by popular vote. Each large factory and army division would vote for their own representatives. These representatives formed the Petrograd Soviet.
  5. 5. The Vice-Chairman (second in command) of the Petrograd Soviet was the gifted lawyer Alexander Kerensky.</li></li></ul><li>Provisional Government and Kerensky<br />Prince Lvov appointed Alexander Kerensky to be his Minister of Justice.<br />Kerensky also became the Minister of War.<br />The two roles occupied by Kerensky were particularly important because the Provisional Government had two challenging goals<br />Continue the war effort in order to avoid a German victory on the Eastern front (and the loss of land that would lead to).<br />Deal with the repressive excesses of the Tsar’s regime by introducing more liberal laws.<br />In July Prince Lvov resigned. He had been unable to gain widespread support in the Provisional government.<br />Alexander Kerensky became the Prime Minister at the end of July.<br />
  6. 6. Kerensky<br />Vice-Chairman of the Petrograd Soviet after the February Revolution.<br />Minister of Justice and of War (February – July)<br />Prime Minister of Russia (July – November)<br />After the Bolshevik Revolution in November 1917 he escaped Russia, living in Paris and Brisbane before settling down in New York (where lectured at universities)<br />He died in 1970.<br />
  7. 7. The Failed Kerensky Offensive and the Failed Bolshevik Uprising in July 1917!<br />Learning Intentions:<br />Know who Alexander Kerensky was.<br />Know why his offensive in June failed.<br />Understand why Lenin’s attempt at revolution in July failed.<br />Assess: who was the biggest loser at the end of July?<br />

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