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Hand Writing Without Tears 12-05-2015

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Hand Writing Without Tears 12-05-2015

  1. 1. How it began? In 1977, Jan Olsen set out on a mission to help her son. Responding to John’s tears over handwriting in first grade, Jan used her occupational therapy training and background to develop strategies to facilitate his handwriting.
  2. 2. Why It Works The Handwriting Without Tears® curriculum draws from years of innovation and research to provide developmentally appropriate, multisensory tools and strategies for your classroom.
  3. 3. It is a fact 0 Research shows that handwriting is a foundational skill that can influence student’s reading, writing, language use, and critical thinking (Saperstein Associates 2012). 0 When children practice printing by hand, their neural activity is far more enhanced and “adult-like” (Bounds 2010). 0 Research states that learning how to write by hand is a necessary motor exercise (Saperstein Associates 2012; James and Gauthier 2006; James 2012; Berninger 2012). 0 Children consistently do better writing with a pen. They write more and they write faster (Berninger 2009).
  4. 4. The Eight Key Components of Handwriting Hand writing Memory Orientation Placement SizeStart Sequence Control
  5. 5. Components Handwriting Components What can be done? Memory - Remembering and writing dictated letters and numbers Play visual memory games with letters. Use flash cards or hands-on manipulatives Orientation – Facing letters and numbers in the correct direction Teach children that English is a top to bottom, left to right language Placement – Putting letters and numbers on the baseline Model how letters sit on lines. Create games where the child is encouraged to bump lines. Size – How big or small a child chooses to write Use age-appropriate paper. Avoid too much variety of sizes in worksheets and papers. Start – Where each letter or number begins Demonstrate starting position. Correct all bottom-up writing Sequence – Order and stroke direction of the letter or number parts Demonstrate letter formation. Teach letters that use similar formation patterns together Control – Neatness and proportion of letters and numbers One of the most common is poor pencil grip. Teach children to hold their pencils correctly. Spacing – Amount of space between letters in words, and between words in sentences Create and use worksheets that model good spacing. Teach children how to leave room for “nothing” between their words.
  6. 6. Begin to Organize Children with Music Activities and Wood Pieces Shake Hands with Me and Shake Hands with A Friend Using Music to Introduce Wood Pieces Develop Language Using Wood Pieces
  7. 7. Teach Body Awareness with Mat Man™ Mat Man™ Tune: The Bear Went Over the Mountain https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lYiGf_0 elw8&feature=player_detailpage
  8. 8. Hands-On Letter Play—There’s Something for Everyone Building Capital Letters is fun and the ☺ will organize children Roll-–A–Dough Letters™ strengthen hands while teaching letter skills Stamp and See Screen™ develops letter sequencing Slate work is multi-sensory. Small chalk/sponge prepares hands for writing.
  9. 9. Recognizing/ Figure ground
  10. 10. Visuospatial Relationship
  11. 11. Out, Around and front
  12. 12. Up, Down, Top, Middle
  13. 13. Curves and Circle
  14. 14. Vertical & Horizontal
  15. 15. Wooden pieces Template
  16. 16. Hold On...You Have to Teach Grip Research shows that close to 50% of three year olds have the fi ne motor ability to hold a small crayon correctly. * But the correct grip has to be taught to children.
  17. 17. Hold On...You Have to Teach Grip *Research states that close to 50% of 3-year-olds are already using a mature tripod grasp. Schneck, C.M., & Henderson , A. (1990). Descriptive analysis of the developmental progression of grip position for pencil and crayon in non-dysfunctional children. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 44, 893–900. Tseng, M.H. (1998). Development of pencil grip position in preschool children. Occupational Therapy Journal of Research, 18, 207– 224. Yakimishyn, J.E. & Magill-Evans, J. (2002). Comparisons among tools, surface orientation, and pencil grasp for children 23 months of age. American Journal of Occupational Therapy, 56, 564–572.
  18. 18. Teaching the Proper Pencil Grip https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FwuLwaTeaOI CRAYON SONG Tune: “Open and Shut Them” Pick up a crayon, Pick up a crayon, This is easy to do Pick up a crayon, Pick up a crayon, I just tell my fingers what to do My thumb is bent, Pointer points to the tip, Tall Man uses his side I tuck the last two fingers in, And take them for a ride Now I’m holding it just right, But not too tight, Every finger knows what to do And now I have a big surprise, A big surprise for you Let’s drop ’em and do it again
  19. 19. Teach Strokes, Shapes, Letters and Numbers in Developmental Order 0 When introducing strokes, shapes, letter and numbers to children use developmental principles. Some strokes are easier to write (developmentally) than others. Children gradually develop the ability to copy forms in a very predictable order. * This order is shown below
  20. 20. Tips on Tracing It is important to use a model that is familiar to what children see and do. When having children trace, use models that look continuous. Modeling shapes, strokes and letters with highlighters work well for tracing over.
  21. 21. Developmental Teaching Order Frog Jump Capitals
  22. 22. Developmental Teaching Order Starting Corner Capitals
  23. 23. Developmental Teaching Order Centre Starters Magic C Letters
  24. 24. Why Capitals?
  25. 25. Why Capitals? 1. Easier 2. All capitals start at the top. Strokes are made in the correct sequence. (formation) 3. No reversals. (orientation) 4. Recognition

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