PACE Great Streets, Healthy Communities I

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Download the Great Streets report at http://www.memphis.edu/pace/pdfs/great-streets-report-may2010.pdf

PACE has engaged key stakeholders of the built environment (land developers, builders, realtors, residents, policy makers, designers, and lenders) in discussions to uncover understandings of barriers, supports, and recommendations for building activity friendly neighborhoods. It is our hope to work toward enhanced community involvement and shared vision for healthy living in the greater Memphis area and beyond.

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PACE Great Streets, Healthy Communities I

  1. 1. Great Streets… Healthy Communities PA RT NERSHIP FO R AC TIVE CO M M U NITY ENVIRO NM ENTS APRIL 21, 2010 THE UNIVERSITY OF MEMPHIS FU L L RE P O RT:H T T P : / / W W W. M E M P H I S . E D U / P A C E / P D F S / G R E AT - S T R E E T S - R E P O R T - M AY 2 0 1 0 . P D F
  2. 2. The Event Half-day event held on April 21, 2010 Hosted by the University of Memphis Partnership for Activity Community Environments (PACE) and Urban Land Institute – Memphis (ULI) Attended by over 175 architects, builders, developers, engineers, plan ners, health, policy, and government professionals
  3. 3. The Purpose To bring together professionals involved in all aspects of the built environment to identify ways to create healthy and active community environments
  4. 4. The Agenda - Keynotes Keynote Presentations  RickHall  Scott Polikov Topics focused on traffic, public policy, and planning/development issues and the potential impact on community health
  5. 5. The Agenda - Roundtables Attendees were assigned tables forming multidisciplinary small groups Trained facilitators led table dialogue between presentations Keypad polling devices were used to gather input with poll results instantly reported
  6. 6. Who Attended? Architects Builders 4% 1% Developers 7% Other 21% Realtors 1% Engineers Policy/Gov 16% 6% Planners 16% Health 25% Lenders 3%
  7. 7. Results
  8. 8. Barriers to Building Active Environments Costs of development Perceived safety of suburban areas Subdivision requirements may limit active designs Zoning / Code regulations Political influence Focus on automobile Lack of collaboration and communication Lack of education and marketing Negative perceptions of public transportation Lack of connectivity Short term focus
  9. 9. Supports for Building Active Environments Tax incentives and credits Increased market demand Decreased processing time for approvals Promotion of public/private initiatives Neighborhood support for active design Active transportation initiatives Parking variances Address safety concerns Address zoning regulations Grants and funding opportunities
  10. 10. Action Ideas for PACE Increase communication and education among different professionals Adopt Smart Code and approve UDC Examine health and market outcomes for existing neighborhoods with active design Increase community involvement Initiate changes in zoning and planning Explore collaborative grant opportunities Funds for pedestrian/bike paths, parks, etc. Initiate tax incentives and fee waivers Enhance public transportation
  11. 11. Participant Definitions of“Activity Friendly Environments” Safe areas to walk and play  Accessible recreation facilities Mixed use with high and places to be active connectivity (walk between  Parks and green spaces home, work, shopping, recreat  Places to reflect and “re- ion) create” Attractive and inviting public  Nice landscaping spaces  Reduced dependence on Family friendly automobiles Programmed events  Open spaces for recreational Community involvement sports Safe environment with low  Places to sit, talk, picnic, etc crime
  12. 12. About PACE
  13. 13. What is PACE? Funded by a two year grant from The National Institutes of Health, PACE is a participatory based grant focused on the incentives and barriers to building active community environments.  PACE has engaged key stakeholders of the built environment (land developers, builders, realtors, residents, policy makers, designers, and lenders) in discussions to gain understanding of barriers, supports, and recommendations for building activity friendly neighborhoods. It is our hope to work toward enhanced community involvement and shared vision for healthy living in the greater Memphis area and beyond.
  14. 14. PACE Research Team Barbara McClanahan, Ed.D., Ph.D., leads the PACE initiative and serves as the projects Principal Investigator. She holds terminal degrees in Exercise Science and Leisure Management and in Interdisciplinary Higher Education. She currently serves as Unit Chair for the Health Promotion Program in the department of Health and Sport Sciences at the University of Memphis. Michelle Stockton, Ph.D., is a Co-Investigator on the PACE initiative. She is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health and Sport Sciences at the University of Memphis. Dr. Stockton has a background in clinical psychology, group facilitation, formative research, and qualitative and quantitative research methodology. Kenneth D. Ward, PhD is Faudree Professor and Director of the Division of Social and Behavioral Sciences in the School of Public Health at The University of Memphis. He also serves as Adjunct Professor of Preventive Medicine at University of Tennessee Health Science Center, and Intervention Director of the Syrian Center for Tobacco Studies. Dr. Ward is a clinical health psychologist and a fellow of the American Academy of Health Behavior and the Society of Behavioral Medicine. George Relyea, M.A., M.S., is currently Assistant Research Professor of Applied Mathematics in the Center for Community Health and directs Data Management Services (DMS) and statistical consulting in the Center. He has 28 years experience as a statistician, programmer, data manager, instructor, and research consultant.
  15. 15. PACE Advisory Board Connie Binkowitz, Staff Coordinator, Obesity & Diabetes, HMCT Rusty Bloodworth, Executive Vice President - Boyle Investment Co., Shunji Brown-Woods Jon McCreery, President - Chamberlain & McCreery Rick McClanahan, Director Engineering and Utilities - City of Bartlett David Parsons, President - David Parsons Construction Art Sutherland, III M.D. FACC Cristie Upshaw Travis, CEO, Memphis Business Group on Health Mark Wofford, President, Dimension Construction, Inc Ted Simpson, EVP and Chief Lending Officer - MAGNA BANK
  16. 16. Connect with PACE http://www.memphis.edu/pace/ https://www.facebook.com/PACEforHealth @PACEforHealth pace.memphis@gmail.com

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