Tfk tobacco prevention talking points 11 19-10

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PUBLICATION OF THE CAMPAIGN FOR TOBACCO FREE KIDS, 2010

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Tfk tobacco prevention talking points 11 19-10

  1. 1. Tobacco Prevention Funding – Key Message Points (You can replace national data with state-specific data from table on page 3) • Tobacco use kills more than 400,000 Americans every year and costs the nation almost $100 billion in health care costs annually – much of it borne by taxpayers. Nearly 90 percent of smokers began as kids, and about 4,000 kids try their first cigarette every day. Another 1000 kids become regular smokers each day, and one-third of them will die a premature death as a result. Comprehensive tobacco prevention and cessation programs are a proven method of preventing kids from starting to smoke and helping adult smokers quit. • The states take in more than $25 billion annually in tobacco taxes and tobacco settlement payments. It just makes sense to use some of this money on programs to prevent kids from smoking and helping smokers quit. It would take less than fifteen percent of this money for every state to fund tobacco prevention programs at the level recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). • It is critical that we fund tobacco prevention programs to keep kids from smoking because the tobacco companies are spending record amounts marketing their deadly products. The most recent data show the tobacco companies spend over $12 billion each year on marketing and promotion, much of which influences kids to smoke. And a Harvard School of Public Health study found that the tobacco companies have secretly and significantly increased the levels of nicotine in cigarette smoke since 1998. • The evidence is clear that tobacco prevention programs work to reduce smoking, save lives and save money by reducing tobacco-related health care costs. Studies have shown that the more states spend on tobacco prevention, the lower the youth smoking rates and overall tobacco use. • There is overwhelming evidence from states around the country that tobacco prevention programs work to reduce smoking, improve health and save lives. Maine, which ranked first in funding tobacco prevention programs from 2002 to 2007, has reduced smoking by 54 percent among high school students since 1997. Washington State, another well- funded prevention program, has cut youth smoking by 50 percent among and adult smoking by a third since its program began. Studies show California’s program, started in 1990, has helped save tens of thousands of lives by reducing smoking-caused heart disease, lung cancer and other diseases. • It’s only right that states use tobacco money to fight the tobacco problem. At the time of the $246 billion state tobacco settlement, states promised to use the money to fund programs to prevent kids from starting to smoke and help smokers quit. Unfortunately, most states have broken that promise. It’s not too late for states to keep their promise and fund tobacco prevention, especially since most states have increased tobacco taxes since the settlement and collect record amounts of tobacco revenue each year (in fiscal year 2011, the states will collect $25.3 billion in tobacco-generated revenue). • Tobacco prevention programs are also a smart investment for states that save money by reducing smoking-caused health care costs. Tobacco use costs the nation – and the states – $96 billion a year in health care costs. That includes more than $30 billion a year in Medicaid costs, much of it paid by states and their taxpayers. In the short-term,
  2. 2. the best state tobacco prevention programs have saved $3 in health care costs for every dollar spent. These savings grow sharply over time. • Policymakers are in a unique position on this issue. We know the problem caused by tobacco. We know that comprehensive prevention and cessation programs are a critical part of the solution. We have a clear revenue source to fund the solution. And, the public overwhelmingly supports using tobacco revenue for tobacco prevention. All we need is the political will to act.
  3. 3. State-Specific Data for Key Message Points (all Dollar Amounts in Millions of 2004 Dollars Except Where Otherwise Indicated) State Adult Smoking- Caused Deaths Annual Smoking- Caused Healthcare Costs Kids who try smoking per year New youth smokers per year Total Annual State Revenues From Tobacco FY2011 % Of Revenue Needed to Fund at CDC Level Tobacco Industry Spending Annual Smoking Caused Medicaid Health Costs CDC Annual Spending Target Alabama 7,500 $1.49 bill. 39,700 10,700 $242 23.4% $261.6 $238.0 $56.7 Alaska 490 $169 4,000 1,100 $100 10.7% $24.9 $77.0 $10.7 Arizona 6,800 $1.3 bill. 24,000 6,500 $438 15.5% $172.8 $316.0 $68.1 Arkansas 4,900 $812 14,600 3,900 $283 12.9% $155.7 $242.0 $36.4 California 36,600 $9.14 bill. 136,200 36,900 $1.7 bill. 26.7% $819.5 $2.9 bill. $441.9 Colorado 4,300 $1.31 bill. 21,000 5,700 $296 18.4% $170.7 $319.0 $54.4 Connecticut 4,700 $1.63 bill. 17,300 4,700 $529 8.3% $123.0 $430.0 $43.9 Delaware 1,100 $284 4,100 1,100 $158 8.8% $106.7 $79.0 $13.9 DC 720 $243 1,800 400 $69 15.2% $16.0 $78.0 $10.5 Florida 28,600 $6.32 bill. 84,300 22,800 $1.6 bill. 13.2% $881.4 $1.2 bill. $210.9 Georgia 10,500 $2.25 bill. 42,100 11,400 $369 31.6% $426.4 $537.0 $116.5 Hawaii 1,100 $336 6,200 1,700 $180 8.4% $42.1 $117.0 $15.2 Idaho 1,500 $319 5,400 1,400 $73 23.2% $57.9 $83.0 $16.9 Illinois 16,600 $4.10 bill. 72,500 19,600 $848 18.5% $452.4 $1.5 bill. $157.0 Indiana 9,700 $2.08 bill. 36,500 9,900 $599 13.2% $426.2 $487.0 $78.8 Iowa 4,400 $1.01 bill. 15,000 4,000 $295 12.4% $174.2 $301.0 $36.7 Kansas 3,800 $927 12,400 3,300 $175 18.3% $104.6 $196.0 $32.1 Kentucky 7,800 $1.50 bill. 24,400 6,600 $389 14.7% $417.5 $487.0 $57.2 Louisiana 6,500 $1.47 bill. 24,800 6,700 $291 18.4% $241.0 $663.0 $53.5 Maine 2,200 $602 6,200 1,600 $195 9.5% $59.0 $216.0 $18.5 Maryland 6,800 $1.96 bill. 24,700 6,700 $546 11.6% $188.8 $476.0 $63.3 Massachusetts 9,000 $3.54 bill. 26,700 7,200 $821 11.0% $194.6 $1.0 bill. $90.0 Michigan 14,500 $3.40 bill. 68,000 18,400 $1.3 bill. 9.6% $393.6 $1.1 bill. $121.2 Minnesota 5,500 $2.06 bill. 26,900 7,300 $585 10.0% $196.6 $465.0 $58.4 Mississippi 4,700 $719 15,800 4,200 $271 14.5% $185.5 $264.0 $39.2 Missouri 9,500 $2.13 bill. 31,900 8,600 $245 29.9% $419.9 $532.0 $73.2 Montana 1,400 $277 4,100 1,100 $122 11.4% $33.3 $67.0 $13.9 Nebraska 2,200 $537 8,100 2,200 $107 20.1% $72.1 $134.0 $21.5 Nevada 3,300 $565 10,600 2,800 $148 22.0% $113.8 $123.0 $32.5 New Hampshire 1,700 $564 7,000 1,900 $268 7.2% $122.2 $115.0 $19.2 New Jersey 11,200 $3.17 bill. 38,400 10,400 $961 12.5% $226.3 $967.0 $119.8 New Mexico 2,100 $461 8,600 2,300 $129 18.1% $47.0 $184.0 $23.4 New York 25,400 $8.17 bill. 88,900 24,100 $2.1 bill. 11.3% $429.6 $5.4 bill. $254.3
  4. 4. State Adult Smoking- Caused Deaths Annual Smoking- Caused Healthcare Costs Kids who try smoking per year New youth smokers per year Total Annual State Revenues From Tobacco FY2011 % Of Revenue Needed to Fund at CDC Level Tobacco Industry Spending Annual Smoking Caused Medicaid Health Costs CDC Annual Spending Target North Carolina 12,200 $2.46 bill. 44,100 11,900 $423 25.2% $535.9 $769.0 $106.8 North Dakota 800 $247 2,600 700 $56 16.6% $32.3 $47.0 $9.3 Ohio 18,500 $4.37 bill. 66,800 18,100 $1.2 bill. 12.4% $556.7 $1.4 bill. $145.0 Oklahoma 6,200 $1.16 bill. 19,900 5,400 $379 11.9% $213.1 $218.0 $45.0 Oregon 4,900 $1.11 bill. 16,900 4,600 $313 13.7% $137.0 $287.0 $43.0 Pennsylvania 20,000 $5.19 bill. 68,400 18,500 $1.5 bill. 10.5% $533.9 $1.7 bill. $155.5 Rhode Island 1,600 $506 5,300 1,400 $184 8.3% $35.1 $179.0 $15.2 South Carolina 6,100 $1.09 bill. 23,400 6,300 $235 26.5% $282.6 $393.0 $62.2 South Dakota 1,000 $274 4,100 1,100 $88 12.8% $37.0 $58.0 $11.3 Tennessee 9,700 $2.16 bill. 30,100 8,100 $428 16.8% $405.5 $680.0 $71.7 Texas 24,500 $5.83 bill. 115,100 31,200 $1.8 bill. 14.4% $854.2 $1.6 bill. $266.3 Utah 1,100 $345 6,000 1,600 $147 16.1% $58.7 $104.0 $23.6 Vermont 800 $233 2,800 700 $103 10.1% $27.4 $72.0 $10.4 Virginia 9,200 $2.08 bill. 34,700 9,400 $297 34.7% $411.3 $401.0 $103.2 Washington 7,600 $1.95 bill. 28,200 7,600 $593 11.3% $146.0 $651.0 $67.3 West Virginia 3,800 $690 10,300 2,800 $185 15.0% $140.4 $229.0 $27.8 Wisconsin 7,200 $2.02 bill. 29,400 7,900 $840 7.7% $274.0 $480.0 $64.3 Wyoming 700 $136 2,600 700 $46 19.6% $27.6 $37.0 $9.0 Sources: Adult deaths and Annual smoking-caused healthcare costs: CDC, State Data Highlights 2006, http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/state_data/data_highlights/2006/index.htm; CDC, "State-Specific Smoking-Attributable Mortality and Years of Potential Life Lost – United States, 2000-2004," (MMWR) 58(2), January 22, 2009. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/wk/mm5802.pdf New youth smokers. Estimate based on U.S. Dept of Health & Human Services (HHS), “Summary Findings from the 2009 Nat’l Survey on Drug Use and Health,” http://www.oas.samhsa.gov/NSDUH/2k9NSDUH/2k9ResultsP.pdf State Revenue from tobacco: The state settlement revenues include the tobacco settlement bonus payments expected to be included in annual MSA payments made to states in April 2011. Estimated state tobacco tax revenue amounts are based on monthly Tax Burden on Tobacco data, state agencies, and conservative projections using the most recent data available. Tobacco industry spending: U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC), Cigarette Report for 2006, 2009, http://ftc.gov/os/2009/08/090812cigarettereport.pdf. See also, FTC, Smokeless Tobacco Report for the Year 2006, 2009, http://ftc.gov/os/2009/08/090812smokelesstobaccoreport.pdf. Data for top 5 manufacturers only. CDC Annual Spending Target: CDC, Best Practices for Comprehensive Tobacco Control, October 2007. http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/tobacco_control_programs/stateandcommunity/best_practices/index.htm. See also, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, et al., A Decade of Broken Promises: The 1998 State Tobacco Settlement Twelve Years Later, 2010, http://www.tobaccofreekids.org/reports/settlements/.

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