Toledo Harbor Dredging Summit 2009

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  • You all heard LTC Snead challenge us all to identify the remaining suite of alternatives to manage dredged material in Toledo Harbor. I want to stress the importance of finding that right mix of dredged material management practices.
  • This is a picture of the University of Toledo football stadium where the Rockets play. This image depicts 850K cubic yards of sediment placed within the yard lines of the football field, 159 yards high or 477 feet high. This image represents 850K cubic yards of sediment which is the amount of material we should dredge annually to maintain the Federal channel. This is the minimal amount of sediment, we as a group, need to accommodate through best management practices.
  • Maybe instead of 89% of the sediment being placed in the open lake, we identify alternative measures for dredged material management that requires only 60% of sediment to be open lake placed.
    Right now, we know that 10% of the sediment requires confined disposal placement. And, 1% of sediment is currently manufactured as NuSoil.
    Based on our brownfield restoration project in Lorain Harbor, we estimate that Toledo could accommodate 150K cubic yards of sediment each year through brownfield restoration for the next 20 years (17% of our annual contract). Current USACE habitat restoration projects indicate that in the near term, we could likely accommodate 11 percent, or 100K cy of dredged material, each year for the next 3-5 years.
    This is just a quick breakdown of what finding the right mix in Toledo Harbor could look like. 2/3 of these initiatives (open lake placement, CDF, habitat restoration, and NuSoil) are current or near term activities pursued by the Corps of Engineers.
  • The Port of Toledo is economically essential to the region. Adds $1 B to economy and employs 1000 people.
    Toledo Harbor and its dredging issues are unique in the Great Lakes and require unique solutions. Toledo Harbor dredging is the largest project (both cost and quantity dredged) in the Great Lakes. In fact, Toledo Harbor dredging alone constitutes 25% of the total dredging in the Great Lakes.
    The Toledo Harbor dredging project is listed by the USACE as “critical”, with the potential for dredging issues to severely restrict channel availability within 5 years. This is the result of a combination of factors.
    So, the Port of Toledo is critically important and this has been fully and consistently recognized by the State of Ohio and its agencies.
  • Lake Erie is critically important to Ohio in a number of ways. In addition to the economic benefits of shipping, Lake Erie Tourism generates $$$ and employs about ??? People.
    Lake Erie is again entering critical condition-sediment and nutrients are feeding large algae blooms (including harmful species such as microsystis and lyngbya).
    The algae blooms die and contribute to eutrophication and the depletion of oxygen or “dead zone”.
    USEPA recognizes the problem in the GLRI.
    Maumee River is the largest contributor of sediment to the Great Lakes. The amount of annual dredging required is roughly equivalent to the annual discharge of sediment from the Maumee. Adding additional complications is the fact that the Western Basin of Lake Erie is the shallowest area of Lake Erie (maximum depth of 35 feet and the disposal area is less than 25 feet). This shallow depth allows material that is open lake disposed to be moved by waves and currents around the Western Basin and even contribute suspended sediment to the Central Basin.
    The challenge of managing dredge material has been contentious since the early 1970s and has not been adequately resolved to date. There are three key issues: 1) keeping the Port open and operating at full capacity, 2) dredging in environmentally friendly ways (hydraulic instead of clamshell dredges) and 3) proper management of the dredged material. The first issue can be addressed by increasing the dredging activity to eliminate the backlog and then annually maintain the channel. This would require increased appropriations over a period of several years. The second issue could be addressed by the Port Authority if it is successful in purchasing its own hydraulic dredge for use in dredging the federal channel as well as other areas served by commercial shipping interests. This should allow for environmentally more friendly dredging and help address the back-log of sediment that is impacting the shipping business.
    The third issue, what do to with the dredged material, is key to the entire program. The continued open lake disposal of the material has been opposed by the State of Ohio and the State of Michigan. Ultimately the beneficial reuse of the dredged material is critical to solving this unique problem. High water levels and storm events have radically changed the character of Maumee Bay over the years. A potential solution is to use the material to restore lost habitat in the Western Basin and Maumee Bay or to create new habitat in the form of islands or Habitat Restoration Units. . Most of the dredged material is clean enough to be reused for purposes of reestablishing these habitat features. However, addressing this problem as a standard USACE beneficial reuse project is difficult due to current Corps rules.
    There is a need to treat Toledo Harbor dredging differently. Due to the size of the challenge and the significance of the Port, there should be a much greater Federal share of the cost for the initial project design and construction. Beneficial reuse should be established as the best option for Toledo Harbor rather than following a “federal standard” of unacceptable open lake disposal that requires state and local cost sharing just to dredge the harbor and properly reuse the material. The creation of Habitat Restoration Units (islands) out of dredge material is the conceptual option at this time that appears to be viable and able to handle the quantity of dredged sediment. We concur with the concept of making the creation of such islands eligible for funding under the GLRI, and would greatly appreciate if a way could be found to have these funds satisfy the local match requirements.
    It is important to observe that the Great Lakes dredging crisis need not exist based upon financial reasons. There is sufficient funding to adequately dredge and properly reuse the dredged material. The Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund appropriately collects funds from waterborne commerce to be used for maintain our harbors. There is currently some $4 Billion in this fund which could and should be used to dredge the harbors to the prescribed depths and properly reuse the dredged material. This action is supported by many associated with the Toledo Port including the Lake Carriers Association.
  • Ohio has long (22 years) consistent position on this issue
    Toledo Harbor must be kept open
    Lake Erie must be restored & open lake disposal is not acceptable
    Beneficial use and source reduction-best
    Strongly support cooperative partnerships
    Environmentally Friendly Dredging
    The chronology demonstrates that we cannot continue the patterns of the last 23 years. It suggests that we cannot maintain this Harbor and protect the Lake unless there is another course of action.
    We recommend that local and state entities continue to work with the Corps on implementing the HRU’s but that we also develop a local approach to solving this problem.
    Ohio is presently preparing an application for funding pursuant to the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative and Toledo Harbor would become one of our highest priorities for funding through this initiative.
    Here is what this might look like.
  • Provide active support and assistance to the Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority to obtain the capacity to use hydraulic dredging to maintain the Toledo Harbor Navigation Channel, and to minimize the use of clamshell dredging techniques for the majority of dredging within the channel. Such support could include seeking funding or writing letters of support for the Port to obtain a hydraulic dredge unit that would be devoted to the harbor.
    Finalize and implement options to manage all material dredged from the Toledo Harbor Navigation Channel after 2011 through the use of Habitat Restoration Units, Confined Disposal Facilities (assuming commensurate height increases), beneficial uses of dredged sediment, and other means of expanded capacity.
    Finalize an environmentally acceptable Sediment Management Plan (SMP) for Toledo Harbor with a minimum life of 30 years. The Plan will address dredging needs, acceptable dredging practices, beneficial reuse of sediments, and alternatives in the event that preferred options are not feasible or do not meet expected timeframes. The plan will be developed in cooperation with all stakeholders.
    Implement long term options to beneficially reuse material such as Habitat Restoration Units and programs for dredged material reuse (topsoil, construction material, fill material, etc. ).
  • “Beneficial reuse” of dredge material also carries some unique livability aspects. Increasingly, there are restrictions on the open lake disposal of dredge material, which is forcing the port to explore creative ways to reuse the material.
    Nu-Soil Production: Since 2000, the Port Authority has partnered with the Toledo Wastewater Treatment Plant to blend dredge material and treated waste solids to produce bulk landscape soil for parks, highways, and other landscape features.
    Mine Reclamation: the Port is exploring the use of up to 200,000 cubic yards of material for mine reclamation in eastern Ohio. If successful, the concept could extend to a number of quarries that dot the landscape of northwest Ohio.
    Soils+ Production - dredged material is blended with power plant ash to produce a high quality building material. When completely developed, this project could utilize 200,000 cubic yards of dredged material annually.
    The City of Oregon is proposing to utilize dredge material to restore a 57 acre industrial site (Wynn Road Section 204 Regional Sediment Management Project).
    The State of Ohio is working with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers on developing a habitat restoration project (Maumee Bay Section 204 Regional Sediment Management Project).
    Other Blending Opportunities – Private individuals and local business have obtained dredged material for other blending projects. One process currently being tested is using the fine grained dredge material for brick production.
    In summary, beneficial reuse of dredge material turns a waste product into an environmental asset. Instead of disposing dredge material, it is blended for use in construction fill, landscaping, and environmental reclamation projects.
  • Toledo Harbor Dredging Summit 2009

    1. 1. Welcome to the 2009 Toledo Harbor Dredging Summit Michael J. Stolarczyk Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority President and CEO
    2. 2. Agenda  Our Perspective – The Impact of the Current Dredging Situation in Toledo Harbor  Lunch – Grand Ballroom of Hilton – Followed by Key Note Speaker Jim Weakley  Environmental Windows for Dredging-Achieving Balance Between Protection, Economic Viability and Contractor Feasibility  Dredged Material Management Through Beneficial Reuse – Current Status, Success Stories and Challenges  Open Dialogue Facilitated by John Vickerman
    3. 3. Our Perspective – The Impact of the Current Dredging Situation in Toledo Harbor 10:30 a.m. - Noon
    4. 4. Jim McKinstray Director of Transportation The Andersons
    5. 5. Confidential – Not to be shared without permissionConfidential – Not to be shared without permission responsive rooted focused enduring evolving diversified progressive resourceful responsive rooted focused enduring evolving diversified progressive resourceful responsive rooted focused enduring evolving diversified progressive resourceful responsive rooted focused enduring evolving diversified progressive resourceful
    6. 6. Confidential – Not to be shared without permissionConfidential – Not to be shared without permission responsive rooted focused enduring evolving diversified progressive resourceful responsive rooted focused enduring evolving diversified progressive resourceful responsive rooted focused enduring evolving diversified progressive resourceful responsive rooted focused enduring evolving diversified progressive resourceful
    7. 7. Confidential – Not to be shared without permissionConfidential – Not to be shared without permission responsive rooted focused enduring evolving diversified progressive resourceful responsive rooted focused enduring evolving diversified progressive resourceful responsive rooted focused enduring evolving diversified progressive resourceful responsive rooted focused enduring evolving diversified progressive resourceful
    8. 8. US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG® Finding the Right Mix LTC Dan Snead District Commander U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District September 23, 2009
    9. 9. BUILDING STRONG® The Current Mix  850K cubic yards ► FY09 cost $5.2 million ► 100 percent Federal expense  Current backlog of 1.9 million cubic yards Open Lake Placement 99% Confined Disposal Facility 1%
    10. 10. BUILDING STRONG® Finding the Right Mix Other BMPs NuSoil Sediment Load Reduction Habitat Restoration Brownfield Restoration CDF Open Lake 850K cy per year 65% Federal 35% non-Federal 100% Federal 75% Federal 25% non-Federal The right mix is a balance of all management practices.
    11. 11. BUILDING STRONG® Sediment Resuspension (tons/km2 ) 0 15,000,000 30,000,000 45,000,000 60,000,000 75,000,000 90,000,000 105,000,000 120,000,000 135,000,000 150,000,000 Wind Induced Open Lake Placement Wind induced sediment resuspension is at least 172 times greater than sediment resuspension caused by open lake placement (based on DePinto et.al., 1986).
    12. 12. GEORGE ELMARAGHY, CHIEF DIVISION OF SURFACE WATER Toledo Harbor Dredging Ohio EPA Perspective
    13. 13. WWTP Effluent vs. Dredged Sediment For Quantity Perspective Only Parameter Toledo Bay View WWTP Effluent (based on 2008 data) Toledo Harbor Dredged Sediment (based on 2004 data & 1.25 million cu. yds) Cadmium Samples below detection limit 2.50 tons/yr Lead Samples below detection limit 48.03 tons/yr Mercury 2.18 pounds/yr 620 pounds/yr Silver Samples below detection limit 0.61 tons/yr Zinc 5.1 tons/yr 250.74 tons/yr Phosphorus 69.4 tons/yr 1208.82 tons/yr Total Suspended Solids 983 tons/yr 2,062,500 tons/yr (total solids) Selenium Samples below detection limit 1.25 tons/yr Ammonia 20.4 tons/yr 311.65 tons/yr Operating Expenses $41 million based on 2007 Annual report FY10 Budget - $5 million
    14. 14. 401 Certification History  1987 – Ohio EPA & U.S. EPA determined open lake disposal of sediment was unacceptable as it does not satisfy acceptable environmental practices  1987-present – Ohio EPA issued 401 certifications temporarily allowing open lake disposal while alternatives were to be developed.  Appeals settlement 2005  MOA between USACE, Ohio EPA & ODNR Habitat Restoration Units in western basin  2006/2007 - Open lake placement of 600,000 yd3 /yr  Investigation into WQ related impacts of dredging activities on fishes in western basin  Restricts environmental window for dredging  Implementation progress is very slow  August 2008 & March 2009 – Draft Open Lake Disposal rules made available for public comment
    15. 15. Ending Open Lake Disposal Phase One  Use existing facilities.  Raise berms at CDFs, beneficial reuse, seek additional funding. Phase Two  Implement Habitat Restoration Unit or other disposal and beneficial reuse methods that can deal with the huge volume of dredged materials. Phase Three  Implement watershed management plan for Western Lake Erie to decrease solids to Toledo Harbor and shipping channel. All three phases have to proceed concurrently.
    16. 16. Sean D. Logan Director Ohio Department of Natural Resources
    17. 17. Collister “Terry” Johnson Administrator St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation
    18. 18. Jim Weakley President Lake Carriers Association Lunch – Key Note Speaker Grand Ballroom of Hilton
    19. 19. Environmental Windows for Dredging-Achieving Balance Between Protection, Economic Viability and Contractor Feasibility 1:10 – 1:50 p.m.
    20. 20. Roger Knight Lake Erie Fishers Program Manager ODNR Division of Wildlife A Fisheries Perspective on the Importance of Environmental Windows in Lake Erie
    21. 21. Fisheries are important Management Goals: • sustainable harvest policies • protect/restore habitat • accommodate unmanageable factors Native Fish Species Natural Reproduction # # # ## ## ## # # # ## ## # # # # # # # # ## # # ## # ###################### ## 10 0 10 20 30 Miles N EW S spawning nursery Walleye reproductive habitat
    22. 22. ODNR Environmental Windows dredging, pipelines, piers, bridges, etc.
    23. 23. Kurt Luedtke President Luedtke Engineering The Dredging Contractor’s Perspective
    24. 24. Dredged Material Management Through Beneficial Reuse – Current Status, Success Stories and Challenges 2 – 3:20 p.m.
    25. 25. US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG® Scientific Evidence Supporting the Acceptability of Open-Lake Placement of Toledo Harbor Dredged Material Scott W. Pickard Ecologist US Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District September 23, 2009
    26. 26. BUILDING STRONG® Why Open-Lake Placement is Environmentally Acceptable  Section 404 of the Clean Water Act—USACE has substantive legal and environmental responsibilities pursuant to the Act  Supporting science (weight-of-the-evidence) ► Perception—Practice degrades aquatic (underwater) habitat and ecology at open-lake area SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE: Site located to avoid significant spawning grounds and the aquatic habitat is common; area remains resilient, healthy and stable
    27. 27. BUILDING STRONG® Why Open-Lake Placement is Environmentally Acceptable ► Perception—Practice adversely affects organisms living in open-lake area SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE: Bottom-dwelling organisms at open-lake area are very similar to those in surrounding lake bottom; risks of turbidity impacts to fish are low ► Perception—Practice results in toxic effects to organisms SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE: Dredged material is similar to “ambient” bottom sediments in the basin; chemical and biological tests indicate low contaminant bioavailability and toxic effects; data indicate compliance with State Water Quality Standards for Protection of Aquatic Life in Lake Erie
    28. 28. BUILDING STRONG® Why Open-Lake Placement is Environmentally Acceptable ► Perception—Practice loads sediment into the basin and exacerbates harmful algal blooms (HABs) due to phosphorus content SCIENTIFIC EVIDENCE: >90% of dredged material is from the lake; effects from wind-induced sediment resuspension in Western Basin and the available phosphorus budget are enormous compared to that associated with open-lake placement; proposed 2010 HAB investigation
    29. 29. US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG® Beneficial Use of Dredged Material Kathy Griffin Chief, Operations Branch U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District September 23, 2009
    30. 30. BUILDING STRONG® The 850k Cubic Yard Question
    31. 31. BUILDING STRONG® A Potential Right Mix Open Lake Placement 50% Sediment Load Reduction 1% Brownfield Restoration 5% Habitat Restoration 29% Confined Disposal Facility 15% NuSoil 35% Soils Plus 65%
    32. 32. BUILDING STRONG® Status of Habitat Restoration Projects  Maumee Bay ► Multiple Projects-Max $7.7M Each (65/35 Cost Share) ► Can Accommodate 1-20 Years Annual Dredging ► Restore and Enhance Aquatic and Terrestrial Habitat ► Passive Recreation and Wildlife Observation ► NEED NON FED SPONSOR ► Construction Proposed 2012  Wynn Road ► Single Project-Max $7.7M (65/35 Cost Share) ► Can Accommodate 5-15% of 1 Year Dredging ► Riparian Ecosystem Restoration ► City of Oregon is Non Fed Sponsor ► Construction Proposed 2011
    33. 33. Corey Timko Director of Utilities City of Lorain City of Lorain Beneficial Reuse Strategy for Brownfield Restoration
    34. 34. Black River Solids Recycling Facility City of Lorain 1. Current Confined Disposal Facility-CDF 2. New home for dredged material-dredging area 3. How the new facility will operate 4. Benefits of reusing the material
    35. 35. Facility layout
    36. 36. Total area of brownfield rehabilitation
    37. 37. Ed Hammett Executive Director Lake Erie Commission A Review of State and Local Support for Beneficial Reuse Options
    38. 38. Lake Superior LakeMichigan LakeHuron Lake Erie Lake Ontario IN CANADA CANADA CANADA WISCONSIN OHIOINDIANAILLINIOS PENNSYLVANIA NEW YORK MICHIGAN MINNESOTA Grand Marias Two Harbors Duluth Superior Ashland Ontonagon Keweenaw Waterway Presque Isle Marquette Grand Marias St. Marys River Channel in Straits of Mackinac Grays Reef Little Bay de Noc Menominee Green Bay Kewaunee Port Washington Milwaukee Kenosha Manitowoc Sheboygan Waukegan Chicago River & Harbor Calumet Indiana H arbor B urns W aterw ay H arbor St. Joseph Harbor Holland Grand Haven Muskegon Harbor Ludington Manistee Frankfort Charlevoix Cheboygan Alpena Saginaw Harbor Beach Monroe Channels in Lake St. Clair St. Clair River Detroit River Rouge River Toledo Sandusky Harbor Huron Lorain Cleveland Fairport Ashtabula Conneaut Erie Dunkirk Buffalo H arbor Rochester Harbor O sw ego O gdenburg 800K 100K – 250K 50K – 95K <50K ANNUAL DREDGING REQUIREMENT (CY) DREDGED MATERIAL MANAGEMENT STATUS Critical – Dredged Material Management issues could severely restrict channel availability within 5 years Pressing – Dredged Material Management issues could severely restrict channel availability within 10 years. No pressing issues within next 10 years; continue to work on long range planning such as DMMPs.
    39. 39. Ohio’s Position • Ohio has long (22 years) consistent position on this issue • Toledo Harbor must be kept open • Lake Erie must be restored & open lake disposal is not acceptable • Beneficial use and source reduction- best • Strongly support cooperative partnerships • Environmentally Friendly Dredging
    40. 40. Project Priorities • Organize the Toledo Harbor Interagency Team • Support TLCPA to obtain hydraulic dredge • Finalize and Implement short-term plan • Finalize a 30-yr Sediment Management Plan • Implement the long-term beneficial use options • Goal is to complete the plan in one year
    41. 41. Beneficial Reuse Projects • Nu-Soil Production • Mine Reclamation • Soils+ Production • Wynn Road Section 204 Regional Sediment Management Project • Habitat Restoration Project-Maumee Bay Section 204 Regional Sediment Management Project or other HRU projects • Other Blending Opportunities • Other opportunities (upland habitat restoration, Woodtick Peninsula protection or restoration)
    42. 42. One Maritime Plaza 4th Floor Toledo, OH 43604 P: 419-245-2514 E: lakeeriecommission@ameritech.net W: http://lakeerie.ohio.gov
    43. 43. Open Dialogue 3:20 – 4 p.m.
    44. 44. Contacts  Joe Cappel – jcappel@toledoportauthority.org  Michael Stolarczyk – mjstolarczyk@toledoportauthority.org  John Vickerman – john@vickermanassociates.com  Jim Weakley – weakley@lcaships.com  Jim McKinstray – jim_mckinstray@andersonsinc.com  LTC Daniel Snead – daniel.b.snead.ltc@usace.army.mil  George Elmaraghy – george.elmaraghy@epa.state.oh.us  Sean D. Logan – sean.logan@dnr.state.oh.us  Roger Knight – roger.knight@dnr.state.oh.us  Kurt Luedtke – kurtluedtke@charter.net  Scott Pickard – scott.w.pickard@usace.army.mil  Kathy Griffin – kathy.m.griffin@usace.army.mil  Corey Timko – Corey_Timko@cityoflorain.org  Ed Hammett – edhammett@ameritech.net

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