Some non-technology implications for wider application of robots to assist older people Priyesh Tiwari, Jim Warren, Karen ...
Challenges of silver care <ul><li>Emphasis on “ageing in place” leading to more elders living alone </li></ul><ul><li>Decl...
Innovating technology-based  solutions <ul><li>Continuum of support </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Internet and mobile-based suppor...
Value of robots as AT <ul><li>Robots introduce some exciting options:  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mobility – engaging patients ...
Silver care robots at University of Auckland
Silver care robots at University of Auckland <ul><li>Falls monitoring and prevention </li></ul>Vital signs monitoring Medi...
Considerations for design policy Socio-cultural Financial Regulatory Ethical
Ethical considerations Agenda Ensure Monitor Report Empowerment Autonomy Privacy Adherence/ Compliance Outcomes Costs
Social and cultural context  Technology best plays role  of a process enabler Technology is not yet validated as a possibl...
Financial implications Need tight balance between features & utility to minimise costs Can delay institutionalisation Can ...
International environment <ul><li>Canada, UK & USA are proactive in tele-health & assistive technologies </li></ul><ul><li...
Conclusion <ul><li>Design process must address non-technological issues as well </li></ul><ul><li>Paucity of direct eviden...
Thank you <ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul>Acknowledgements Joint UoA/ETRI laboratory for u-Healthcare Robotics  (Joint N...
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Some Non-technology Implications for Wider Application of Robots to Assist Older People

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Priyesh Tiwari
National Institute for Health Innovation, University of Auckland
www.health.auckland.ac.nz/nihi
(P36, 1/10/09, Sigma Room, 4.00)

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Some Non-technology Implications for Wider Application of Robots to Assist Older People

  1. 1. Some non-technology implications for wider application of robots to assist older people Priyesh Tiwari, Jim Warren, Karen Day, Bruce MacDonald University of Auckland
  2. 2. Challenges of silver care <ul><li>Emphasis on “ageing in place” leading to more elders living alone </li></ul><ul><li>Declining physical & cognitive capabilities requiring more assistance </li></ul><ul><li>Resolving shortage of caregivers </li></ul>
  3. 3. Innovating technology-based solutions <ul><li>Continuum of support </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Internet and mobile-based support </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Remote monitoring </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ambient sensing & intelligent monitoring devices </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Healthcare robots </li></ul></ul>Declining capabilities
  4. 4. Value of robots as AT <ul><li>Robots introduce some exciting options: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mobility – engaging patients </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Mobility – navigational support </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Providing emergency alert </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Video surveillance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Movement tracking </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Automated dialogue </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wireless integration </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Reducing caregivers routine repetitive tasks </li></ul>
  5. 5. Silver care robots at University of Auckland
  6. 6. Silver care robots at University of Auckland <ul><li>Falls monitoring and prevention </li></ul>Vital signs monitoring Medication reminder Location monitoring
  7. 7. Considerations for design policy Socio-cultural Financial Regulatory Ethical
  8. 8. Ethical considerations Agenda Ensure Monitor Report Empowerment Autonomy Privacy Adherence/ Compliance Outcomes Costs
  9. 9. Social and cultural context Technology best plays role of a process enabler Technology is not yet validated as a possible substitute to human contact Family & physician acceptance Impact on day-to-day operations Organisational acceptance
  10. 10. Financial implications Need tight balance between features & utility to minimise costs Can delay institutionalisation Can reduce ADE, falls and hospitalisation Containment of manpower cost Robots are relatively expensive AT Public funding or personal contribution? Justify in relation to other available options
  11. 11. International environment <ul><li>Canada, UK & USA are proactive in tele-health & assistive technologies </li></ul><ul><li>Australia, New Zealand & Japan are relatively lagging behind </li></ul>
  12. 12. Conclusion <ul><li>Design process must address non-technological issues as well </li></ul><ul><li>Paucity of direct evidence in relation to healthcare robots - specific studies are needed </li></ul>
  13. 13. Thank you <ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul>Acknowledgements Joint UoA/ETRI laboratory for u-Healthcare Robotics (Joint NZ-Korean initiative) National Institute for Health Innovation This presentation can be viewed on hive

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