C-Level Innovation
as collaborative business transformation
An archestra notebook
© 2014 Malcolm Ryder / archestra research
In the following discussion, the statements and
illustrations are descriptive representations based on
extensive field obs...
Assumptions
• Executives are responsible for assuring that the current and future opportunities
of the business make sense...
Organizing Executive Attention
• Executive roles make the most sense when it is understood that the real-time
accountabili...
CEO:
business
modeler
CFO:
business
resourcer
COO:
business
engineer
CIO/CSO:
business
processor
CMO:
business
driver
CTO:...
Coordinating Change
• A model of coordination provides the common reference allowing the executive
team members to decide ...
The Portfolio Overview
• Executives are always involved in portfolio-type decisioning, where investments
are being made in...
Deciding on Capabilities
The portfolio of commitments to capability must literally
provide for a future-orientated iterati...
ISSUE GOAL PURSUIT
JUSTIFY in: OFFER via: PRODUCE with:
WHAT/WHY: Distinction Usage
Profile
Promotion Development
HOW/WHEN...
The C-Team:
CEO, COO, CMO
In one scenario (among many possible combinations), the C-team co-operates by taking
responsibil...
Problem: making and keeping an advantage in
ability to meet market preferences…
Changes occurring within any of
the six ma...
Re-Modeling for Business Value
In this discussion’s form of the business value model, any of the six main elements may
cha...
Value of the modeled business in the market
There are three high-level measures qualifying the decisions to make intention...
Producers focus on reliably meeting demand within the conditions of the market environment. The
strategy for continually l...
Open Future (Agility)
Current market environments exceed the conventional assumptions about controlling
complexity – prima...
Agility & Collaborative Execution
Brokers bring or hypothesize the requirements for acceptance in the market, and Agents b...
An especially radical transformation has
occurred due to the unprecedented
availability of powerful, ubiquitous tools
and ...
Model
Elements
New “ordinary” scenarios Influencers Related Resources
Usage Profiles through easy exposure to vast amounts...
Lasting Observations
• Markets change whether businesses change or not
• Changes, including innovations, have meaning in t...
CEO:
business
modeler
CFO:
business
resourcer
COO:
business
engineer
CIO/CSO:
business
processor
CMO:
business
driver
CTO:...
CEO:
business
modeler
CFO:
business
resourcer
COO:
business
engineer
CIO/CSO:
business
processor
CMO:
business
driver
CTO:...
Recaps
• A currently active business model is a collaborative iteration of a system
• The business model is subject to cha...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

C levelinnovation-140210190415-phpapp01

240 views

Published on

C-Level Innovation as Collaborative Business Transformation - Archestra Research

Published in: Business, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
240
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
16
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

C levelinnovation-140210190415-phpapp01

  1. 1. C-Level Innovation as collaborative business transformation An archestra notebook © 2014 Malcolm Ryder / archestra research
  2. 2. In the following discussion, the statements and illustrations are descriptive representations based on extensive field observations. Their intent is to abstract and categorize observations that were found to be broadly applicable across a wide-range of businesses, by size and type. The information offers logical summations, whether general or specific, for the purpose of encouraging ongoing recognition in additional future cases, more commonly in a diagnostic manner. No assertion or warranty of prescriptive validation is implied or intended. While aspects of the discussion may prove to be evident in given cases, the discussion itself may be modified and reissued at any time.
  3. 3. Assumptions • Executives are responsible for assuring that the current and future opportunities of the business make sense in timeframes needed to succeed. • Due to technology and its enablement of innovations, the timeframe between what works now and what will work next seems to be ever-shrinking. Fewer businesses have substantially privileged information about market demands, and fewer businesses are able to catch high-speed leaders of applied new discoveries by acquiring their same capabilities. • As a result, new capabilities, if acquired, are most likely to help if they power new distinctions differentiating the business presence in the market as another kind of "market leadership", which really means bringing a special kind of value into the market. • Acquisition of capabilities is a basic responsibility of executives for supporting the realization of future opportunities based on creating that value.
  4. 4. Organizing Executive Attention • Executive roles make the most sense when it is understood that the real-time accountability of certain issues is assured by a role. The assignment of the accountability becomes a "primary", not an exclusive, responsibility. The primary responsibility leverages relevant contributions made by other roles. Other roles, meanwhile, have different primary responsibilities. • The interaction of the roles is essentially teamwork, but this "Team" concept makes sense only in the context of a designated actual pursuit. The basis of the team structure (organization) is a delegation of responsibilities to be coordinated. • In contrast, what makes the “Work” a collaboration (execution) is the co- operation of the responsible parties. • Creating and maintaining the necessary value of the business requires a way to assure that co-operation occurs in terms of the coordination needed to support the value.
  5. 5. CEO: business modeler CFO: business resourcer COO: business engineer CIO/CSO: business processor CMO: business driver CTO: business designer Knowledge Focus Align implementation of model to opportunity within governance and agreements Develop and manage capital for operational investment or consumption Build and deploy organizational structure with functional compliance to strategy Automate and support applied systematizations of processes Select, prioritize and navigate engagement with prospects in markets Identify new technological modes of business enablement Key Interest ROI Assets Resources Services Relationships Platforms Supported effects Agreements Agreements Methods Methods Interactions Interactions External impact areas Positions Sources Partners Networks Channels Utilities Internal impact areas Risks Allocations Workgroups Systems Communications Infrastructure Roles Modeling (typical) ©2014MalcolmRyder/archestra C-team members have predisposed attentions that need to become synchronized contributions.
  6. 6. Coordinating Change • A model of coordination provides the common reference allowing the executive team members to decide how to use their contributions. As the idea of a coordinating model applies generically to "strategy", the model in question here is strategic, while being more specially focused on the problem of exploiting ongoing change for value. • Coordination supports a game plan that shows how actions and events drive conditions towards desired outcomes. • A single model for driving value to market can be iterated in many ways. A major goal is to consistently associate executive roles with the need for and timing of those iterations.
  7. 7. The Portfolio Overview • Executives are always involved in portfolio-type decisioning, where investments are being made in different ways for different kinds of opportunities to reach various desired future conditions. • To make the investment decision, the general effort is to study the risks of not gaining the future state, the probability of being effective in supporting the pursuit, and the confidence in both of the above. • As a result, the portfolio decision includes risk-based prioritization, ROI-based investment, and knowledge-based expertise. The portfolio is not about finance but about capability. The decision method is applied to all kinds of opportunities. • Opportunities compete with each other to gain a permanent place within the boundary of overall available money during time. For example, in the I.T. world, the “opportunity” to keep the lights on must make it within the boundary, but the opportunity to transform for the competitive future must also make it within the boundary.
  8. 8. Deciding on Capabilities The portfolio of commitments to capability must literally provide for a future-orientated iteration of the model for meeting conditions of future value, and likewise a present- orientated iteration of the model for current value management. The key difference is that support of conditions for current value should expect to have an end-of-life, while support of future value should expect to have an assertively ready foundation. Meanwhile, the challenge is to make the co- existing support productive going forward, because businesses cannot run backwards through time… A high-level capability assessment would compare the expectations that characterize the main scenarios of support for the conditions required for value. A portfolio addresses expected levels of risk, return and knowledge associated with the scenarios going forward. In particular, innovations, whether created internally or procured externally, must become contributors to capability. Also, they should go through a portfolio analysis that weighs the difference between gaining a proprietary versus non- proprietary advantage in delivering the target value of the business to the market. Portfolio Decision 1. Prioritization 2. Investment 3. Expertize Risk ROI KM Current conditions Future conditions Future support Current support 1. Medium 2. Medium 3. High 1. High 2. High 3. Medium 1. High 2. Medium 3. Medium 1. TBD 2. TBD 3. TBD © 2014 Malcolm Ryder / archestra
  9. 9. ISSUE GOAL PURSUIT JUSTIFY in: OFFER via: PRODUCE with: WHAT/WHY: Distinction Usage Profile Promotion Development HOW/WHEN: Capacity Catalog Provision Logistics The Basic Value Model The model of the business value, simplified into a framework, explains what the business will use to achieve the distinction and capacity needed to take and hold a competitively successful position vis-à-vis the market demand. The high-level framework identifies six areas where executives should decide and align their intentions, means, and plans. The collective decisions make up the C-level view of how it matters that the business is in the markets. ©2014MalcolmRyder/archestra
  10. 10. The C-Team: CEO, COO, CMO In one scenario (among many possible combinations), the C-team co-operates by taking responsibilities as follows: • CEO: the Business Modeler -- sets and approves a definition to be realized for implementing each of the six areas • COO: the Business Engineer -- builds the instance of the model as specified under CEO direction • CMO: the Business Driver -- navigates the business in real time through the demand conditions of the market As a result, in this scenario the CMO is in a position to feed back opportunity assessments (viability) to the CEO and effectiveness assessments (feasibility) to the COO.
  11. 11. Problem: making and keeping an advantage in ability to meet market preferences… Changes occurring within any of the six main elements of the business model can alter the available connections between demand and supply. These changes may be intentional or unintentional… Depending on changes, prior established connections, even if still necessary in certain cases, may be insufficient to satisfy the required overall strength of competitiveness throughout unintentional changes. © 2014 Malcolm Ryder / archestra
  12. 12. Re-Modeling for Business Value In this discussion’s form of the business value model, any of the six main elements may change, as either a re-envisioning or a refinement of the overall model. By definition, these changes are systemically important – like variables in a formula. The possibility of making changes intentionally is therefore weighed against some corresponding measures of high-level outcome. These high-level "measures" are a specifically defined concept of the business’s “value in the Market". In this concept’s definition: • "value" means "the significance of the difference", • the difference is the combined distinction and capacity maintained in the market, • and the significance is the impact that the difference has, NOT primarily defined as financial results but instead as advantaged competitive opportunity. The business must strategize and execute this value in the market(s).
  13. 13. Value of the modeled business in the market There are three high-level measures qualifying the decisions to make intentional changes in the value model. We will refer to this group of high-level measures as “Value Support” Measures. These measures require the influence of additional stakeholders on the team. In our scenario, addressing the measures pairs the CEO, COO and CMO each with working partners, responsible for addressing designated measures. ROLE Responsibility “Value Support” Measure PARTNER CEO Business “modeler” Cost of the strategy (validated competitive position and ROI) CFO COO Business “engineer” Quality of effort (business processes) CIO/CSO CMO Business “driver” Priority of market engagement (market relationships portfolio) CTO In these C-level pairings, the primary challenge to managing the business behaviors is usually the volatility of numerous influencers on the market. Influencers are both external and internal to the business. Less-volatile influencers make markets more predictable. More specifically, the challenge is: to avoid behavioral rigidity that fails to accommodate necessary changes, while at the same time to sustain enough consistency to allow business functions to rationally achieve goals. The C-team needs the ability to continually resynchronize. © 2014 Malcolm Ryder / archestra
  14. 14. Producers focus on reliably meeting demand within the conditions of the market environment. The strategy for continually leveraging those conditions has conventionally been cast in terms of planned campaigns such as "hunting" or "farming" -- or in terms of planned procurement such as by "engineering" or "programming“ a proprietary link to an existing supply. However, all of those terms presume a manageable level of impact that the environment's complexity will have on the probability of desired outcomes. More complexity and less predictability weaken the strategy. Proprietary Past (Control)
  15. 15. Open Future (Agility) Current market environments exceed the conventional assumptions about controlling complexity – primarily due to the unprecedented levels of information access and of technology innovation affecting expectations, products and production. The resulting variability of influences in the market environment creates the need to focus on continually regenerating connections between discoverable current sources of demand and discoverable current sources of supply. The effect is that markets are not persistently proprietary, but instead are increasingly open. This problem of needing real-time dynamic connectivity is almost always referred to as the problem of Agility. The proven terms of operation for this challenge call for Brokers and Agents to work together. Relying on mutual discoverability, Brokers bring or hypothesize the requirements for acceptance in the market, and Agents bring the availability of relevant fulfillments.
  16. 16. Agility & Collaborative Execution Brokers bring or hypothesize the requirements for acceptance in the market, and Agents bring the availability of relevant fulfillments. Together the brokers and agents make agreements on aligning their interests over meaningful periods of time. This dynamic structuring of business is the effective go-to-market capability; it features a persistent and timely presence as a facilitator in significant opportunities – fortified by research and relationships. The C-level team is a broker for its business with awareness of market requirements, and it is also the agent of its business fulfillment capability. In this cooperation, the team is able to pursue the distinction and capacity that is the basis of the business’s (industrial) success in the market. In allocating responsibilities, the business brokers are most often (but not exclusively) the CEO, COO and CMO; the business agents are most often (but not exclusively) the CFO, CIO/CSO, and CTO. BROKER Responsibility AGENT Responsibility CEO Business “modeler” CFO Business “resourcer” COO Business “engineer” CIO/CSO Business “processor” CMO Business “driver” CTO Business “designer” © 2014 Malcolm Ryder / archestra
  17. 17. An especially radical transformation has occurred due to the unprecedented availability of powerful, ubiquitous tools and services for information search and data analysis. The combination of search and analysis has immediately meant that new profiles of meaningful demand (product usage) and new sources of relevant supply (production logistics) can rapidly, if not spontaneously, find each other (and customers) independently of prescribed interventions by the business. When the demand-side discoveries converge with the supply side discoveries, they interactively create options that may lie outside of the business’s current offerings and are not yet appearing in its catalog nor in its development queue. Problem: the imperative for Open Market Agility © 2014 Malcolm Ryder / archestra As brokers and agents themselves, the C-team wants to proactively master search and analysis to sense emerging influences and impending opportunities that should affect the business value model
  18. 18. Model Elements New “ordinary” scenarios Influencers Related Resources Usage Profiles through easy exposure to vast amounts of information, consumers can self- discover capabilities, options and preferences that they may not even have previously acknowledged and that also appear to be viable self-discovery social networking Promotion having exemplary “preview” experiences is more common than ever due to rich media and 24x7 connectivity to media channels freemiums mobile apps, html5 Development "sourcing" and feature sets are both dramatically diverse and rapidly supplied through current toolsets and more precision about functional scopes mashups open source, PaaS, agile Catalog electronic storefronts with search engines glue together a tremendously wide range and volume of choices in a virtual product category for which all category members have the same delivery service level aggregation e-payments, auto- recommendations Provision consumers can have provision largely auto-attended by non-invasive monitoring that intelligently decides when and how to offer and/or supply something digital streaming GPS, sensors Logistics the mechanics of the supply process are largely engineered to move the least amount of material necessary through make-and-ship over the least required distance in the least necessary time, effectively giving higher just-on-demand availability without significant errors robotics Nano, 3D printing, internet of things Key lasting transformations can also occur within each of the six areas of the business model, creating more new elements of possible interactions that become available for facilitation by brokers and agents. Current market realities are recognizable in numerous related applied innovations that are quickly becoming "ordinary" while also enabling entirely new interactive combinations. Interactive combinations of innovations across the business model elements effectively offer new specific interpretations of the generic model. ©2014MalcolmRyder/archestra
  19. 19. Lasting Observations • Markets change whether businesses change or not • Changes, including innovations, have meaning in terms of how they affect important capabilities to execute the model the business uses to stake its value in the market • Innovations occur in many forms and can change various elements of the model asynchronously, requiring a collaborative effort by managers to adapt • Multiple innovations may combine inside and outside of the business, to create, sometimes abruptly and/or definitively, new reasons to execute business differently
  20. 20. CEO: business modeler CFO: business resourcer COO: business engineer CIO/CSO: business processor CMO: business driver CTO: business designer JUSTIFY: Usage Profiles What/Why What/Why What/Why What/Why What/Why What/Why Catalog How/When How/When How/When How/When How/When How/When OFFER: Promotion What/Why What/Why What/Why What/Why What/Why What/Why Provision How/When How/When How/When How/When How/When How/When PRODUCE: Development What/Why What/Why What/Why What/Why What/Why What/Why Logistics How/When How/When How/When How/When How/When How/When C-Team Innovation Heat Map Sensitive Influential Assertive Mapping expectations is a method of communicating how the C-team will probably pursue their continual re-synchronization as changes occur and become opportunities or risks in the business value model. ©2014MalcolmRyder/archestra Strongly Moderately
  21. 21. CEO: business modeler CFO: business resourcer COO: business engineer CIO/CSO: business processor CMO: business driver CTO: business designer JUSTIFY: Usage Profiles X Catalog X OFFER: Promotion X Provision X PRODUCE: Development X Logistics X Connecting The Dots C-team cooperation is constrained by both the ability to express the overall importance of possible changes to the current implementations of the model, and by the relationships of team members as stakeholders in the model. Iterating the business value model includes understanding how innovations fit into generating distinction and capacity. ©2014MalcolmRyder/archestra
  22. 22. Recaps • A currently active business model is a collaborative iteration of a system • The business model is subject to changes originating both internally and externally • Changes such as innovations systemically affect the potential value of the current model of the business in the market • C-team members are distinct stakeholders differentiated by knowledge, expectations and sensitivity • C-level decisions about different elements of the model, including innovations of them, need to align with an overall game-plan derived for supporting the value of the model or for modifying the model • Internal synchronization of the model requires the C-team’s motivation to support the external market impact of the model

×