Education for an imperfect world: engaging students in the ethics of global issues - Andrea Bullivant

4,259 views

Published on

Presentation given at the HEA Social Sciences learning and teaching summit 'Teaching ethics: The ethics of teaching'

A blog post outlining the issues discussed at the summit is available via http://bit.ly/1lndTnX

Published in: Education, Spiritual
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
4,259
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3,288
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Education for an imperfect world: engaging students in the ethics of global issues - Andrea Bullivant

  1. 1. Education for an Imperfect World: Engaging Students in the Ethics of Global Issues Andrea Bullivant Liverpool World Centre/Liverpool Hope University
  2. 2. Liverpool World Centre To empower people in Merseyside to work for global and social justice in their local and global community. Liverpool Hope University Wider Perspectives in Education Students are encouraged to....reflect on their beliefs, the purpose of education and the needs of children growing up in a global context…. TEESNet (Teacher Education for Equity and Sustainability) A unique collaboration of HE, NGO’s schools and other education bodies, to promote Education for Sustainable Development/Global Citizenship
  3. 3. Key idea: ‘Global learning’ as a pedagogical approach for engaging students Two examples of global learning approaches:  Philosophy for Children (Communities of Enquiry)  Open Spaces for Dialogue and Enquiry (OSDE)
  4. 4. Global learning should be seen as a pedagogical approach that is relevant and appropriate to the construction and application of knowledge within a subject, fit for the 21st century, that ……………….recognises the relevance of global processes, the value of differing voices and perspectives, and above all that includes critical reflection. Bourn D 2012 Global Learning and Subject Knowledge
  5. 5. And…….. ……an approach that moves from reproducing bodies of knowledge to one that recognises learners’ engagement with this knowledge and their different starting points, influenced by a range of external factors. (including) learners’ own sense of place and identity in the world Bourn D 2014 The Theory and Practice of Global Learning
  6. 6.  Fairness and equality  Sustainable living  Diversity, identity and belonging  Rights and responsibilities  Peace and conflict Starting points……..
  7. 7. How might we think beyond an education that merely seeks to inculcate knowledge toward just education that provokes insight into the conditions of freedom, justice and responsibility themselves? Todd S 2009
  8. 8. Philosophy for Children
  9. 9. What kind of ethical issues? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TmbcrnXD1DM Our stimulus
  10. 10. What kind of ethical issues?  Global solidarity versus global competition  Reconciling local and global identities and interests  Responsibility for or responsibility towards  ‘Soft’ versus ‘critical’ global citizenship education Andreotti, V (2006)
  11. 11. Open Spaces for Dialogue and Enquiry (OSDE)  P4C is based on a tradition that emphasises morality and rationality (i.e. analytic philosophy), the basic principle is that if people reason better, they will see the same thing (a universal morality/truth/way of being/etc.).  The philosophical tradition that is the basis of OSDE…..emphasises ethics and difference, the basic principle is that there will always be difference, that difference and conflict are extremely important for change/learning and that the better we reason, the more we understand that there are no universal parameters ……... In practical terms, OSDE facilitation has the specific objective of developing critical literacy and an ethical relation to difference,
  12. 12.  Andreotti V 2006  Bourn D 2012 Global Learning and Subject Knowledge  Bourn D 2014 The Theory and Practice of Global Learning 
  13. 13.  P4C is based on a tradition that emphasises morality and rationality (i.e. analytic philosophy), the basic principle is that if people reason better, they will see the same thing (a universal morality/truth/way of being/etc.).  The philosophical tradition that is the basis of OSDE (i.e.continental philosophy) emphasises ethics and difference, the basic principle is that there will always be difference, that difference and conflict are extremely important for change/learning and that the better we reason, the more we understand that there are no universal parameters as at different periods of time, different cultures/peoples/individuals will invariably see things in ways that are based on different assumptions about reality and being. In practical terms, OSDE facilitation has the specific objective of developing critical literacy and an ethical relation to difference,
  14. 14. Education that puts learning in a global context……………fostering: • critical and creative thinking • self-awareness and open-mindedness towards difference • understanding of global issues and power relationships • optimism and action for a better world. www.think-global.org.uk
  15. 15. ……….content-focused, information-based, and grounded in everyday practice, providing guidance about behaviours, shifts in habit, ……exemplified by approaches where problems are explained to people and guidance about solutions provided. (Scott W & Vare, P Due 2014)
  16. 16. Little Red Riding Hood – what questions might a philosopher ask?  What does it mean to be wicked?  Is everyone capable of both good and evil?  How much freedom should parents give their children?  Is it always wrong to talk to strangers?  To what extent should people take responsibility for relatives who are old or infirm?  What do our clothes say about the sort of person we are?  Is it right to kill an aggressor in order to save an innocent victim?

×