Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Designing and Evaluating a
Contextual Mobile Application
to Support Situated Learning
Abeer Alnuaim, PhD
Abalnuaim@ksu.edu...
Testing
Effectiveness of the App (HCI) In-Context Evaluation (DUE)
Development Methodology
Four Phases
HCI Teaching
Motiva...
HCI Teaching
Human-computer Interaction studies the way people
interact with computers in a particular context and
evaluat...
HCI Teaching
Applying empathic design strategies when designing
aids in developing a product that pleases the user
(McDona...
Motivation & Aim
• This research emerged from seeking to identify ways
of getting Human-Computer Interaction Design
studen...
A contextual mobile
learning model
HCI’s Students’
Coursework
It involved designing a GUI for a touch-screen based kiosk
to be installed in the university’s ...
Development
Methodology
The development process has been identified in
phases. These Phases were derived according to the
...
Phase One: Requirements
Gathering
Phase One Key Findings:
• Students lose focus on the purpose of tasks when away
from classroom. They may get distracted by...
Phase 3 &4 : Design and
Evaluation
• Designing a contextual mobile learning application
requires consideration of a number...
Detailed activities within the
iterative development process
Iteration 5
Evaluating the
effectivness
Vavoula and Sharples’s (2009) three-level framework for
evaluating mobile learning was used.
Participants
• There were 55 students enrolled in the HCI module,
seven females and 48 males.
• Students were allowed to f...
HCI’s Deployment
Methodology
Presentation Results
Most groups did very well in their assignment.
The average class mark for this cohort for the
element...
Questionnaire
• 23 students filled in and returned the paper
questionnaire.
• The mean SUS score based on all the
response...
Pedagogical Usability
Statements
N
Mean
Scores
The app helped me in my
observation
23 4.17
The app gave me hints on
what t...
Findings
• overall engagement with the observational
requirements activity, as well as the quality of the
students’ insigh...
Findings
Challenges in designing and evaluating mobile
learning in this context:
• group dynamics
• ownership of mobile de...
In-Context Evaluation
To accurately assess the use and value of this mobile
learning app for higher education students, it...
Participants
• MSc students enrolled in the ‘Designing the User
Experience’ Module
• They are familiar with concepts of HC...
ObservationsResults
• Hesitation or confusion in general (At the
beginning).
• Confused whether to save the notes first or...
Interview
Theme One: General usability
1. Instructions: more explicit instructions should be
available to students at the ...
Discussions
The results of the individual evaluations were
considered as a whole, then they were grouped into
three main o...
Guidelines for implementing a mobile application
for situated learning activities in HE
Guideline
Accessible from the lear...
What is next?
References
• Alnuaim, A. (2015) Designing and evaluating a
contextual mobile learning application to support
situated lear...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Designing and Evaluating a Contextual Mobile Application to Support Situated Learning

725 views

Published on

SKERG Seminar on Aug 18, 2015 titled, "Designing and Evaluating a Contextual Mobile Application to Support Situated Learning" by Dr. Abeer Ali Alnuaim, the Vice Chair of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Department at KSU.

Synopsis: This research emerged from seeking to identify ways of getting Human-Computer Interaction Design students into real world environments, similar to those in which they will eventually be designing, thus maximising their ability to identify opportunities for innovation. In helping students learn how to become proficient and innovative designers and developers, it is crucial that their ‘out of the classroom’ experience of the environments in which their designs will be used, augments and extends in-class learning. The aim of this research is to investigate the process of designing a mobile learning application in a blended learning model. This app was designed to support students in a design task and to develop their independent learning and critical thinking skills, as part of their Human-Computer Interaction coursework. It explores the challenges in implementing and deploying such an app in the learning context. A number of evaluations were conducted to assess the design, usability and effectiveness of the app. Promising results show that the app has helped students in developing critical skills for designing technology. However, there were a number of concerns discovered regarding the context of use of a mobile device, including usability of interface elements and acceptability of using the app in a public place.

Published in: Technology
  • Be the first to comment

Designing and Evaluating a Contextual Mobile Application to Support Situated Learning

  1. 1. Designing and Evaluating a Contextual Mobile Application to Support Situated Learning Abeer Alnuaim, PhD Abalnuaim@ksu.edu.sa
  2. 2. Testing Effectiveness of the App (HCI) In-Context Evaluation (DUE) Development Methodology Four Phases HCI Teaching Motivation Aim
  3. 3. HCI Teaching Human-computer Interaction studies the way people interact with computers in a particular context and evaluates the extent to which these computer based systems are, or are not, designed for successful interaction. Teaching interaction design is a challenging task.
  4. 4. HCI Teaching Applying empathic design strategies when designing aids in developing a product that pleases the user (McDonagh and Thomas, 2010) . Thus, immersing students into real would environments to gather requirements could generate empathy and thus designing a product that is related to the users’ needs.
  5. 5. Motivation & Aim • This research emerged from seeking to identify ways of getting Human-Computer Interaction Design students into real world environments. • Mobile learning applications can provide contextual information that could help students stay focussed on the purpose and outcome of the activity, rather than being distracted by the process. • Mobile Learning is all about personalisation. • Aim: To investigate the process of designing a mobile learning application in a contextual mobile learning model.
  6. 6. A contextual mobile learning model
  7. 7. HCI’s Students’ Coursework It involved designing a GUI for a touch-screen based kiosk to be installed in the university’s cafeteria to offer support to students and staff, helping them make the right meal choices. The assignment was structured as a group project involving three or four students, where the initial work consisted of requirements gathering and analysis to produce a set of artefacts such as a PACT analysis personas and scenarios, and a set of functional and non-functional requirements. The assignment deliverable was an in-class presentation of their work.
  8. 8. Development Methodology The development process has been identified in phases. These Phases were derived according to the User-Centred Design Process (UCD) in the field of HCI. In UCD. The phases for this study were as follows:
  9. 9. Phase One: Requirements Gathering
  10. 10. Phase One Key Findings: • Students lose focus on the purpose of tasks when away from classroom. They may get distracted by their surroundings and miss out key elements. • Some students have been found to struggle in analysing their findings and specifically in using their findings to develop new ideas. • Students care about their privacy and would not easily compromise it. • Android smartphones are poplar among students.
  11. 11. Phase 3 &4 : Design and Evaluation • Designing a contextual mobile learning application requires consideration of a number of issues. These include students’ different learning styles and preferences, the location’s characteristics and its physical and psychological effect on the user, as well as the appropriateness of the location-specific content. • An iterative design approach was followed.
  12. 12. Detailed activities within the iterative development process
  13. 13. Iteration 5
  14. 14. Evaluating the effectivness Vavoula and Sharples’s (2009) three-level framework for evaluating mobile learning was used.
  15. 15. Participants • There were 55 students enrolled in the HCI module, seven females and 48 males. • Students were allowed to form self-selecting groups of 3 or 4. • This resulted in 17 groups; however, only 16 groups presented their work. • 3 groups borrowed the university’s HTC desire phones, • 10 groups used their own phones • While 3 groups neither borrowed or used their own.
  16. 16. HCI’s Deployment Methodology
  17. 17. Presentation Results Most groups did very well in their assignment. The average class mark for this cohort for the elements that were supported by use of the app is 77.32%, which is above the cohort average mark for the assignment as a whole which is 66.15%.
  18. 18. Questionnaire • 23 students filled in and returned the paper questionnaire. • The mean SUS score based on all the responses was 69; this is above the average SUS score.
  19. 19. Pedagogical Usability Statements N Mean Scores The app helped me in my observation 23 4.17 The app gave me hints on what to look for 22 4.36 The app helped me organise my ideas 22 4.18 It was helpful to have a space for note taking 23 2.43 The app helped our group members to share ideas and notes 23 3.74 The Forum (Blog) within the app was useful 18 3.00 It was useful to track my progress through Profile 21 3.71 The app helped me develop ideas for PACT 22 4.36
  20. 20. Findings • overall engagement with the observational requirements activity, as well as the quality of the students’ insights and requirements emerging as a consequence of their observations supported by the use of the sLearn, indicates that the app has had an effective impact on student learning. • The approach used in immersing the student in real environments, can help them view the situation from the perspective of the user, hence helping them to generate empathy.
  21. 21. Findings Challenges in designing and evaluating mobile learning in this context: • group dynamics • ownership of mobile devices • willingness and motivation to engage or try something new • intrinsic ability • the novelty value of the app, and the usability of the interface versus the helpfulness of the content.
  22. 22. In-Context Evaluation To accurately assess the use and value of this mobile learning app for higher education students, it was necessary to conduct in-situ evaluations in the environment of its intended users. Moreover, it is critical to understand what might influence the usability and the user experience of this app in such a busy environment.
  23. 23. Participants • MSc students enrolled in the ‘Designing the User Experience’ Module • They are familiar with concepts of HCI. • 7 out of 30 students participated in the evaluation, five males and two females.
  24. 24. ObservationsResults • Hesitation or confusion in general (At the beginning). • Confused whether to save the notes first or post then save. • Did not know how to remove the keyboard. • Conscious that staff will notice that he/she is not here for buying food.
  25. 25. Interview Theme One: General usability 1. Instructions: more explicit instructions should be available to students at the beginning. 2. Redesign: all participants prefer that under each prompt there should be a text box to write their notes and observations. Theme Two: The Context Personality and self-consciousness: 28.57% of the participants did not feel comfortable looking around at people and writing on the phone.
  26. 26. Discussions The results of the individual evaluations were considered as a whole, then they were grouped into three main overlapping categories relating to: (1) Design and GUI of the app, (2) Usability, User experience and Students’ Perspectives, and (3) Designing and deploying a Blended Learning Model.
  27. 27. Guidelines for implementing a mobile application for situated learning activities in HE Guideline Accessible from the learner’s mobile device- Multi platform compatible Suitable Contextual Content Provide Independent Choices Multimodal Interaction Collaborative facility Clear Instructions
  28. 28. What is next?
  29. 29. References • Alnuaim, A. (2015) Designing and evaluating a contextual mobile learning application to support situated learning. PhD, University of the West of England. • MCDONAGH, D. and THOMAS, J., 2010. Disability relevant design: Empathic design strategies supporting more effective new product design outcomes. The Design Journal, 13(2), pp. 180-198. • VAVOULA, G. and SHARPLES, M., 2009. Meeting the Challenges in Evaluating Mobile Learning: A 3-Level Evaluation Framework. International Journal of Mobile and Blended Learning, 1(2), pp. 54-75, Copyright, IGI Global. Reprinted with permission of the publisher.

×