Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Unit 2 pp2

4,816 views

Published on

unit 2

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

Unit 2 pp2

  1. 1. Unit 2 Children’s Health and well- being
  2. 2. Starter Activity Teenager Daniel Bartlam jailed for killing mother with hammer Bartlam, who was 14 when he beat his mother to death and burned her body, sentenced to minimum of 16 years Read through the article Why do you think Daniel did this? Did he have a secure relationship with his mother?
  3. 3. LO1 Understand children’s needs in relation to emotional well-being. • Explain the process of attachment in babies and young children and the role of the key person D1 • Describe how attachment theory relate to the development of secure relationships D1 • Describe the importance of attachment in relation to emotional well-being D1 • Explain the role of the key person to work in partnership and develop relationships with children D1 • Analyse the impact of secure relationships on a child’s well-being. A1 © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  4. 4. D1 • Children’s emotional development and well-being are closely linked to both social and behavioural development. • If a child is emotionally stable and secure, they are more likely to develop socially – which in turn will have a positive impact on the emotional and the behavioural development. • How safe and secure a child feels impacts on all areas of development, but particularly on their emotional well-being. Maslow recognised the importance of this when creating his hierarchy of needs. • Emotional and social development strengthen a child’s happiness and well-being. The first relationships that they form will have an impact on the rest of their lives. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iucf76E-R2s Introduction
  5. 5. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kwxjfuPlArY 1) what attachment behaviour could be shown? 2) what did Bowlby say children were seeking other than to be fed? 3) what did Bowlby say about children’s outcomes? 4) what type of attachment do parents and babies need to make? 5) what did the parent say impacted on her building attachment to her child? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v =DnGthYxlu0E What is a safe haven? What is a secure base? What is proximity maintenance? What is separation distress?
  6. 6. D1 Attachment theorists • John Bowlby recognised the importance of the child’s first relationships and developed the theory of attachment. He identified four characteristics of attachment: proximity maintenance, safe haven, secure base and separation distress. http://www.simplypsychology.org/bowlby.html • Mary Ainsworth developed Bowlby’s theories further. She focused on the distress of the child and developed the strange situation procedure to identify a child’s reactions to a parent after being left with a stranger. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QTsewNrHUHU • Harry Harlow experimented with monkeys and stated that they must form their attachments during the first year of life. • http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=Harry+Harlow&FORM=R5FD15#vi ew=detail&mid=3CFEDB5BBA958DA2AD8A3CFEDB5BBA958DA2AD8A • James Robertson studied the psychological effects on children who were separated from their mothers, for example, through hospital stays. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s14Q-_Bxc_U Theoretical perspectives on emotional well-being
  7. 7. D1 http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/enver-solomon/childrens-society-good- childhood-report-2012_b_1201211.html Time: 15 mins You will be given a theorist to research Prepare a PowerPoint presentation or a poster to explain their theory and its relevance to the emotional well-being of children. • How has it impacted on practice in settings? • Consider any criticisms of the theory. • Give your presentation to the rest of the class.
  8. 8. D1 Time: 15 mins • You researched a theorist on attachment and learnt about others by sharing your presentations with the rest of the class. • Discuss each of the theories and critically review them. • What are their strengths and weaknesses in relation to childcare?
  9. 9. D1 • Bonding with a baby is vitally important, as we have already recognised. It meets the physiological and safety needs on Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. A bond can be created through the day-to-day routines such as bathing, feeding etc. • The senses are important in developing a relationship with a baby through touch, eye contact and use of voice. • A secure relationship is developed through more emotional connections. This can still be through the regular routines involved in bonding, but the tie is built through non-verbal cues. The quality of these cues will determine the quality of the secure relationship. • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iucf76E-R2s Bonding, attachment and developing secure relationships
  10. 10. Time: 15 mins • In groups, discuss each of the four theorists (Bowlby, Ainsworth, Harlow or Robertson) and relate their theories to practice in your setting. • How do you think settings will illustrate the importance of bonding and secure relationships? • Referring to the worksheet provided, discuss the scenarios and relate them to Bowlby’s four characteristics of attachment. • Critically review each scenario and suggest how you might provide support for children’s emotional well-being in settings. D1
  11. 11. D1 Time: 15 mins Bowlby • What are the four characteristics of Bowlby’s attachment theory? • Explain what they mean and consider examples of these characteristics from placement. Ainsworth • There are eight parts to Ainsworth’s ‘strange situation’ – what are they? • Consider what Ainsworth’s theory tells us about the importance of the secure relationship on a child’s emotional well-being. Harlow • What can we learn from Harlow’s experiments with monkeys about the importance of the secure relationship? Robertson • What impact has James and Joyce’s research had on practice, especially hospital practice?
  12. 12. In small groups Evaluate the importance of attachment for children’s development.
  13. 13. D1 • There are a number of cases of ‘feral’ children. These are children who have not had the opportunity to form attachments and not developed the accepted social skills. • The impact of secure relationships on a child’s emotional well-being can be evaluated by studying cases where children have lacked those initial early attachments. • First relationships usually last for life and form the basis for their later life. Early attachments provide security and stability, which provide the child with the confidence to develop and explore the world. • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dEnkY2iaKis The impact of secure relationships on a child’s emotional well-being
  14. 14. D1 Directed Study Task Time: 15 mins • Research the case of Genie, the ‘wild child’, in preparation for the next lesson. • Make notes on how this case relates to the process of bonding and attachment and the child’s well-being. • What can be learnt from this case about the importance of developing secure relationships?
  15. 15. • The theories of Bandura, Vygotsky and Erikson all recognise the importance of a significant other. • Bandura focuses on the adult as a role model, Vygotsky identifies the more knowledgeable other (MKO) and Erikson recognises that the adult is important in providing confidence for the child to move through the stages. • The importance of the adult role has implications for the practitioner in that they have to ensure that they always provide a good role model. • https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zerCK0lRjp8 © Hodder & Stoughton Limited D1 The role of the key person
  16. 16. Group activity Time: 15 mins • What makes a good role model? • Discuss the role of the key person – list all the roles and responsibilities. • Draw round a member of the group to illustrate the ideal key person. • Annotate your illustration. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited D1
  17. 17. D1 Time: 15 mins Choose one of the following aspects and list activities that you, as a practitioner, could provide to encourage the development of this aspect within the child: • Dispositions and attitudes • Self-confidence and self-esteem • Making relationships • Behaviour and self-control • Self-care • Sense of community. Consider how these aspects support a child’s well-being.
  18. 18. Extension activity Time: 15 mins Scenario: You have been working in your setting for three years and you know all the children and the families very well. However, you are about to move to a new job in a setting in the same town. • In your role as a key person, how do you prepare the children for your departure? One little girl from your old setting sees you in town, taking some of your new children to the local shops to buy ingredients for a cooking activity. She is upset to see you with other children. • How do you console her and explain this to her? © Hodder & Stoughton Limited D1
  19. 19. Assignment Task D1, A1 To achieve D1 you are required to provide leaflet with a clear explanation of the process of attachment and the role of the key person to show understanding of: •attachment theory and the development of secure relationships •the importance of attachment in relation to children’s emotional well-being •the role of the key person to work in partnership and develop relationships with children. To achieve A1 you are required to provide an analysis addition to what you have written for D1 this must examine the impact of secure relationships on children's well-being in relation to: • the impact of attachment • benefits of effective relationships with the key person for children’s emotional health and well-being • potential Implications for child if secure relationships are not experienced in the early years. You must make links to theorists and the EYFS to provide a full analysis of the topic.
  20. 20. Summary: plenary activities 1. Consider the importance of bonding and forming attachments for the child’s development. Can you think of any negative issues? 2. Prepare questions to Interview a key person and ask what their roles and responsibilities are to ask when you start placement. 3. What are the dangers of the key person becoming more important to the child than their own parent/carer? 4. What could the practitioner do to avoid this? 5. Plan and lead an activity to promote emotional well-being unit 16 14.4
  21. 21. Unit 2 Children’s Health and well- being
  22. 22. Starter activity D2 Time: 15 mins • What do you understand by the term ‘transitions’? • What kind of transitions do people have in their lives? List them. • How might we be affected by these? • Write a list of possible positive and negative effects of transitions.
  23. 23. LO2 Understand the needs of children during transition and significant events. • Identify transitions and significant events that a child may experience. D2 • Discuss potential effects of transition and significant events on a child’s life. D2 • Explain the role of the early years practitioner: • in preparing a child for a planned transition • in supporting the needs of children during transition and significant life events. C4 © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  24. 24. D2 Transitions are changes or moves, in this case from one stage of life to another. The first transition that a child might make could be moving from home to a child-minder. How these transitions are handled by both parents/carers and practitioners is very important for the well being of the child. Significant events would be experiences in a child’s life that may affect their development such as the divorce of their parents. Transitions and significant events
  25. 25. Transition Think, pair, share different transitions and significant events that a child may experience.
  26. 26. Pairs activity Time: 15 mins From your think pair share activity • Consider the types of transitions a baby and child might experience. • List significant events that a child might experience in their life. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited D2
  27. 27. D2 • Children will often be apprehensive about any changes, leaving the familiar and moving to somewhere new and unknown. Their worries may be simple such as ‘where are the toilets?’ or more deep seated, for example, worrying about bullying. If these concerns are not recognised and addressed, then a child’s learning and development may be affected. • Significant events in a child’s life, for example, the death of a parent, can have a traumatising effect on a child unless they are recognised and addressed by the practitioner. The child may not always display signs of distress, but it is the practitioner’s duty to be sensitive to the needs of the child and be ready to support them where necessary. Potential effects of transition and significant events on a child’s life
  28. 28. Pairs activity LO3. Understand the needs of children during transition and significant events 3.2 Time: 15 mins Read the article on the Young Minds website entitled ‘Young Minds in Schools’. Discuss and answer the following questions: • Why might some children find it easier to cope with transition and change than others? • How important is the concept of attachment when coping with a transition? • How might a transition affect a child’s behaviour?
  29. 29. D2 It is very important for the practitioner to prepare the child for the forthcoming transition. They need to be sensitive to the child’s concerns and should try to answer all the child’s questions honestly. There are many ways that the practitioner can prepare the child for the transition, for example they can: • arrange visits to the new setting • use ‘circle time’ to address issues and concerns • empathise with the children, try to see things from a child-centred point of view • ensure that all information is passed on to the child’s ‘new’ teacher • create effective links with other practitioners, in case follow up support is needed. The role of the early years practitioner in preparing a child for a planned transition
  30. 30. Group activity D2 Time: 15 mins In your group, choose one of the activities below. Discuss how you would support the child in question and devise an action plan. • You are about to receive a child who has moved from another part of the country – how do you prepare a smooth transition for them? • You have a number of children who are moving from your placement (a nursery) on to a reception class in a different school – what steps can you take to ensure that you minimise any distress to them? • A child’s family is experiencing a break up and a divorce – how would you support a child through this transition in their life?
  31. 31. D2 • As well as being aware of children’s concerns about transition, practitioners should also be sensitive to their needs. • Children may not always voice their concerns, but their behaviour may be a sign that they are anxious, for example, bedwetting or regressive behaviours. The practitioner will need to identify exactly what the child’s needs are – they may need to learn some self-help or organisational skills, especially if they are moving on to primary school where there may not be the same level of adult support. • Children may need to talk about their fears, cuddly toys can be useful here – the children can address their concerns to the cuddly toy, e.g. ‘Teddy is worried about changing classes, what are some of the questions that he has?’ The role of the early years practitioner in supporting the needs of children during transition
  32. 32. Classroom discussion activity D2 Time: 15 mins Josh is about to move from nursery to primary school. He has previously appeared to be a confident, friendly child. However, he has, recently, begun to become more ‘clingy’ to his key person and tearful at the end of the day. • What fears might Josh have? • Use these to help you identify his needs. • Then consider how you can support those needs.
  33. 33. Independent research activity LO3. Understand the needs of children during transition and significant events D2 Time: 15 mins Research innovations that are in place in various settings and LEAs to support transitions for children. • Evaluate the innovations and schemes that you have found – do you think that they are successful or not? • Make a note of your sources.
  34. 34. Extension activity Significant events D2 Time: 15 mins Produce a poster with a diagram to show the various significant events that a child may experience in their early life. Explain how some of these events may affect the child.
  35. 35. Assignment Task D2, C4 To achieve D2 you are required to provide a written report to include a discussion of the potential effects of a range of transitions which must include the identification of: • planned and unplanned transitions • significant events a child may experience • potential effects of transitions and significant events on a child’s life. To achieve C4 you are required to provide an explanation of the role of the practitioner in preparing for and supporting children during transitions to show understanding of: • meeting children's individual needs in relation to transitions and significant events • the role of the key person in supporting children and families • appropriate sharing of information • working in partnership with other professionals.
  36. 36. Reflection activity D2 Time: 15 mins Prepare a questionnaire with questions about transition to ask your supervisor at your placement. Questions could include: • How do you prepare children for transition? • What policies and practices do you have in place to support children through transition? • Have you ever had to support a child through a significant event – how did you manage it?
  37. 37. Summary: plenary activities 1. When you have interviewed your supervisor, evaluate the practices that your setting has in place to support children during transitions. 2. Do you consider their practices robust enough? Why/why not? 3. How would you improve on their practices if you were writing a policy on how to plan for transitions?
  38. 38. Unit 2 Children’s Health and well- being
  39. 39. Starter activity LO3 Understand the physical care needs of children Time: 15 mins • Write a sentence to provide a definition of the term ‘routine’. • List all the physical care needs of children. • Are some needs more relevant to different ages? • Group the care needs into different age brackets. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  40. 40. LO3 Understand the physical care needs of children. • Describe the physical care needs of children. D3 • Explain the role of the early years practitioner during: D3 • nappy changing • toilet training • washing and bath time • care of skin, teeth and hair • meal times. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  41. 41. • Routines will support the physical care needs of children. • Routines should provide a predictable and well-ordered environment, children know what to expect. • Routines are comforting and provide regularity, especially for babies as they enable them to adjust to their own body rhythms. • For toddlers, routines provide security and they are a way of teaching children about how to look after themselves. • The predictability of routines help to reduce anxiety and the child can develop self-control. Physical care needs of children © Hodder & Stoughton Limited D3
  42. 42. D3 Routines should provide a predictable and well-ordered environment. • Nappy changing Provides the opportunity for parents and practitioners to bond with babies. • Toilet training Encourages children to develop independence. • Washing and bath time Shows children how to take care of themselves. http://www.creativeeducation.co.uk/video/94 Why are routines important for children? (cont’d)
  43. 43. Task Work in pairs to Complete the tasks Complete your grid adding what the child’s care needs are and add the Practitioners role for each task http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pregnancy-and- baby/pages/washing-your-baby.aspx
  44. 44. Now you have completed your care routine tasks Complete cross word Reflect on peer assessments from nappy changing activity Work through toilet training hand out How would you care for a child’s skin, teeth and hair? Task D3
  45. 45. Many physical care needs involve intimate personal care. Practitioners need to consider: • How to provide respect and dignity • The welfare of the child. As well as the above, it is the practitioner’s role to educate the child, to consider: • The holistic development of the child – learning to be independent, making their own choices • Provide encouragement of independence and making informed choices. The role of the early years practitioner © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand the physical care needs of children D3
  46. 46. Pairs activity Time: 15 mins 1 In pairs, discuss washing and bath time routines, care of skin, teeth and hair and meal times. • How can you make these routines fun? • What are you teaching the children in each of these routines? • What skills are they learning? • How are they learning to care for themselves? 2 Look at the game cards provided for this session. • Sort them into positive and negative experiences for the child. • Explain all the reasons why you have categorised them as such. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand the physical care needs of children D3
  47. 47. Extension activity Time: 15 mins Daily routines 1. What is a routine? 2. Give an example of a routine. 3. Give three reasons why routines are important for children. 4. Describe what you would do for a skin, teeth and hair or bath time routine for a young child. 5. What would theorists such as Bowlby, Skinner and Piaget have to say about routines? Do their theories support the use of routines in a child’s life? If so, how? © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand the physical care needs of children D3
  48. 48. 1. Name four physical care needs children have. 2. Explain the importance of routines in meeting physical care needs. 3. Describe the role of the practitioner during two different physical care routines. 4. Outline the routines that you have in your setting. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  49. 49. Assignment Task D3 1. To achieve D3 you are required to complete your grid adding an accurate explanation of the role of the early years practitioner in meeting the individual physical needs of children must be given and include children’s needs for: • rest and sleep • fresh air • food and water • nappy changing/toileting/toilet training • washing, bath time, care of skin teeth and hair • protection from injury and illness.
  50. 50. Unit 2 Children’s Health and well- being
  51. 51. Starter activity D4 What are benefits of Rest and sleep ? Answers on your white board please.
  52. 52. LO3 Understand the physical care needs of children. • Explain the rest and sleep needs of: • a baby aged 6 weeks • a baby aged 7 months • a toddler aged 15 months • a child aged 2 and a half years • a child aged 4–5 years • a child aged 6–7 years. D4 • Explain safety precautions which minimise the risk of sudden infant death syndrome. D4 © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  53. 53. There are a number of reasons why we need to sleep. Sleep: • provides rest for the body. • helps the body to grow and fixes injuries. • helps the body and brain to develop and grow. • allows the brain to assimilate all the information it has collected during the day. • enables problem-solving. • is just as important as exercise and healthy eating. Although sleep is important to all of us, it is even more important to a baby and young child whose body and brain are forming and developing all the time. Why we need to sleep © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand the physical care needs of children D4
  54. 54. Pairs activity Time: 15 mins Research the rest and sleep needs of one of the following: • A baby aged 6 weeks • A baby aged 7 months • A toddler aged 15 months • A child aged 2½ years • A child aged 4–5 years • A child aged 6–7 years. Prepare a short talk to give to the rest of the class to explain how much sleep your child needs and why. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand the physical care needs of children [AC 3.3]
  55. 55. Independent research activity Time: 15 mins Research the link between sleep and weight. • What are the implications? • What might the practitioner need to do? • List the sources used. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand the physical care needs of children D4
  56. 56. • As well as sleep, all children will needs periods of quiet time so that they can rest their minds and bodies. • There are many activities children can do that will allow them to rest, such as reading or sitting and completing puzzles. • Children will get irritable if they do not sleep well and have no opportunities to rest, this will then impact on their ability to learn. Time to rest © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand the physical care needs of children D4
  57. 57. Group activity Time: 15 mins Describe how you would encourage children to take time to be quiet and rest during the day. https://uk.pinterest.com/search/pins/?q=quiet%20time%20activities%20for%20c hildren&rs=typed&0=quiet%20time%20activities%20for%20children%7Ctyped • Individual activities • Group activities • Quiet areas • Routine quiet times • Encouraging a child who is tired or irritable to take time to rest. Describe the role of the practitioner in encouraging a child to rest. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand the physical care needs of children D4
  58. 58. • Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is also commonly known as cot death. • This term is used when an apparently healthy baby dies without any warning. • It is very rare, about 250–300 babies in the UK die of it each year. • It is more common in boys and babies with a low birth weight, and is more likely to occur within the first three months. • SIDS is more common in winter. • It is uncommon in South Asian families, although no-one knows why. What is Sudden Infant Death Syndrome? © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand the physical care needs of children D4
  59. 59. There are a number of ways to help reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) when putting the baby down to sleep. • Place the baby on their back. • Let their feet touch the end of the cot – so they cannot slip any further down and below the covers. • Don’t let the baby get too hot – ideal room temperature is 18ᵒC. • The blanket should be no higher than the baby’s shoulders and their head should be left uncovered. • The use of a dummy has been shown to reduce the risk of cot death. How to minimise the risk of SIDS © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand the physical care needs of children D4
  60. 60. LO3 Understand the physical care needs of children D4 Time: 15 mins Discuss the safety precautions that can be taken to prevent sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) by both parents and practitioners. • What precautions should you take in a setting? • Complete the task what is a safe layout http://www.lullabytrust.org.uk/safer-sleep • Design a poster to inform parents of all that they can do to help prevent SIDS. • Consider how this information may be different to the advice given to a practitioner.
  61. 61. 1. One child in your setting is regularly restless and difficult to settle when you put her down for a nap – what should you do? 2. Describe three activities that would encourage 4–5 year old children to slow down and rest during the day. 3. What does SIDS stand for? 4. Describe two safety precautions that could minimise the risk of SIDS. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  62. 62. Assignment Task D4 To achieve D4 you are required to provide a good sleep guide to inform parents / carers you must include an explanation of the rest and sleep needs of children from birth to seven years and consider children’s safety to include: • changing needs of children as they grow • implications of interrupted or lack of sleep • routines for rest and sleep • research in relation to safe sleeping routines to reduce the risk of SIDs.
  63. 63. Unit 2 Children’s Health and well- being
  64. 64. Starter activity LO4 Understand the impact of the early years environment on the health and well-being of children C3 Time: 10 mins © Hodder & Stoughton Limited With your partner design how your ideal Nursery should look
  65. 65. LO4 Understand the impact of the early years environment on the health and well-being of children. • Describe factors within the early years setting which may impact upon the health and well-being of children. C3 • Analyse the role of the early years practitioner in maintaining a healthy environment for children. A2 • © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  66. 66. When considering planning for healthy and safe environments, the indoor and outdoor environment must be included. Indoor environment • There needs to be adequate space for the children to move around safely. • The indoor environment needs to be well ventilated and kept at a suitable temperature all year round. Did your nurseries from your starter activities include the above? Outdoor environment • The outdoor equipment needs to be checked daily. • The outdoor space needs to be clear from debris and any items that should not be there. • Did your nurseries from your starter activities include the above? Planning environments to promote health and well-being © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the impact of the early years environment on the health and well-being of children C3, A2
  67. 67. Practitioners need to ensure the environment is suitable for the age and stage of the children who are using it. • All equipment needs to be suitable for the children who are using it in order to keep them safe, this will include indoor and outdoor equipment • Safety gates and suitable harnesses in highchairs are essential for the safety of babies. Planning environments to promote health and well-being © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the impact of the early years environment on the health and well-being of children C3, A2
  68. 68. Produce 3D Nursery Group 1 0-1 year Group 2 – 3 years Group 3 4-5 years (Year R classroom) Have you considered the indoor and outdoor environment? Is your room age appropriate justify your reasons why ?
  69. 69. Group activity Time: 15 mins Create a list of equipment or activities that would be provided in setting for children aged:- • Under 1 year • 1–2 ½ years (toddlers) • 3–4 years • 4–5 years • Children over 5 years. Discuss how age and stage appropriate equipment helps keep children safe. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the impact of the early years environment on the health and well-being of children C3, A2
  70. 70. Individual needs will need to be planned for to ensure all children are kept healthy and safe. • Children may have individual health or dietary needs and these need to be accounted for when planning. • Some children may have special needs and access or additional supervision may need to be considered when planning. Planning environments to promote health and well-being © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the impact of the early years environment on the health and well-being of children C3, A2
  71. 71. Classroom discussion activity Time: 15 mins Discuss how settings should meet individual needs with regard to health and well-being. Consider: • Allergies • Dietary requirements • Children with physical disabilities • Children with learning difficulties. Why do these individual needs have to be considered when planning with regard to health and safety? © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the impact of the early years environment on the health and well-being of children C3,A2
  72. 72. Pairs activity Time: 10 mins List potential hazards that could be found in the setting. Consider: • Indoor • Outdoor • Security • Personal safety. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the impact of the early years environment on the health and well-being of children C3
  73. 73. Possible hazards Broken equipment Inadequate security Fire Poor hygiene standards Overcrowding Food storage and handling Clutter © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the impact of the early years environment on the health and well-being of children C3
  74. 74. To achieve C3 you are required to produce a staff induction pack to describe a range of different factors within the early years environment which may impact on the health and well-being of children to include: • welcoming environment • working in partnership • promoting children's confidence, self-esteem, resilience • meeting children's individual needs To achieve A2 you are required to the analysis of the role of the early years practitioner in maintaining a healthy environment for children should include: • partnership working with parents/carers • meeting children's individual needs • promoting physical and emotional well-being • inclusive practice. Assignment Task C3, A2
  75. 75. Unit 2 Children’s Health and well- being
  76. 76. Starter Activity Read your Nursery world article discuss and take notes. Do you think this will help Schools in tackling obesity?
  77. 77. Learning Outcomes Identify local and national initiatives which promote children’s health and well-being. Evaluate national and local initiatives which promote children’s health and well-being. B3 Evaluate benefits of working in partnership with parents/carers in relation to children’s health and well-being. A*1
  78. 78. The School Fruit and Vegetable Scheme (SFVS) • This was introduced in 2004, as part of the 5 A Day programme, when all children in Key Stage 1 were given a free piece of fruit or vegetable every day. Food4Life • This is part of the Change4Life programme begun in 2009 by the Department of Health. Its aim is to tackle the issue of obesity. Free school meals • Many children have been entitled to free school meals if their parents have been on benefits; recently the Government has announced that there will be free school meals for all children in Key Stage 1 from September 2014. National and local initiatives for health and well-being © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the impact of the early years environment on the health and well-being of children B3
  79. 79. Change4Life Are you aware of this strategy? Where have you seen evidence of this strategy? How effective do you think it has been? Play England What statements does the ‘Charter for Children’s Play’ make? Has Play England had an effect on your placement and its provision for play and exercise? Local initiatives How does your local authority meet the challenge of promoting and providing for children’s exercise? What initiatives can you find out about? National and local initiatives for health and well-being © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the impact of the early years environment on the health and well-being of children B3
  80. 80. Group activity Time: 15 mins In pairs / three’s research a national or local initiative, for example: • The School Fruit and Vegetable Scheme (SFVS) • Food4Life/Change4Life • Play England/Scotland/Wales • The Government’s plans for free school meals for all Key Stage 1 children • Free milk in primary schools. How does this initiative support the health and well-being of children? © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the impact of the early years environment on the health and well-being of children B3
  81. 81. • Practitioners need to remember that the parent/carer is the ‘expert’ on their child. It is, therefore, very important for practitioners to work closely with parents or carers. An open door policy is helpful in achieving this. • Parents/carers can update practitioners on any changes in their child’s health and well-being. • Parents can help to motivate children. If parents act as role models, this will have more of an impact on the child’s behaviour and they will be more likely to have a positive attitude to health and well-being. Benefits of working in partnership with parents/carers © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the impact of the early years environment on the health and well-being of children A1*
  82. 82. Reflection activity Time: 15 mins How do settings involve parents/carers in promoting the health and well-being of their child? Consider: • Sharing good practice • Open events • 1:1 meetings • Children as positive role models • Practitioners as positive role models How does this partnership benefit the health and well-being of children? © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the impact of the early years environment on the health and well-being of children A1*
  83. 83. Extension activity Time: 15 mins Does the SFVS improve children’s diet? • Find and read through the various evaluations of the SFVS. • List arguments in support of the SFVS and those which are critical. • What do you think about the SFVS? Support your answer with evidence. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the impact of the early years environment on the health and well-being of children B3
  84. 84. 1. In one sentence describe what you understand by health and well-being. 2. Name two national initiatives which promote health and well-being. 3. Explain two benefits of working in partnership with parents/carers to promote the health and well-being of children. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  85. 85. Assignment Task B3, A1* To achieve B3 you are required to evaluate national and local initiatives must show that the learner has: • explored key issues included in national and local initiatives • evaluated initiatives in terms of how they may/may not support children's emotional well-being, physical care, nutrition and exercise needs. To achieve A1* you are required to evaluation must give valid justifications of the requirements to work in partnership with parents/carers to support children’s health and well-being and include: • benefits of working in partnership / appropriate information sharing • implications of not working in partnership.
  86. 86. Unit 2 Children’s Health and well- being
  87. 87. Explain what is meant by healthy eating. Discuss what is meant by healthy eating Note down your thoughts 5 minutes
  88. 88. Explain the nutritional value of the main food groups. C1 D5 • Identify the nutritional requirements of children aged: 0-7 years • Identify vitamins A, B, C, D, E and K • Describe food and drink requirements in line with current frameworks • Identify the advantages and disadvantages of breast / bottle feeding. • Demonstrate how to make up formula feeds using the correct procedures. • Describe when to wean a baby • Identify the four stages of weaning © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  89. 89. Time: 10 mins Use your paper to design your own eat well plate Label your plate and explain the nutrients each food provides.
  90. 90. Time: 10 mins • Using the table on the worksheet provided, list the five main food groups. • Make a list of the foods that would be in each group. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO5 Understand the nutritional needs of children C1 Name of food groups Foods in each group
  91. 91. Fruit and vegetables • Source of vitamins and minerals, especially vitamin C • Should eat five portions a day. Starchy foods • Bread, cereals and potatoes • Should make up about one third of everything we eat • Main nutrients – carbohydrates, fibre, some calcium and iron, B group vitamins. Meat, fish, eggs and beans • Good sources of protein • Vitamins and minerals such as iron, zinc and B minerals. Milk and dairy foods • Good sources of protein and also contain calcium. Fat and sugar • Contain vitamins and essential fatty acids. • Research your given vitamin what is the role in the body ? Check Your Answers Explain the nutritional value of the main food groups © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  92. 92. Research task the role of vitamins in the body
  93. 93. Group 1 0 -1 year Group 2 1-2 years Group 3 2-3 years Group 4 3-5 Years Group 5 5-7 Years Feedback the information you have found ensure you have added nutrients, vitamins and the role in the body, via padlet Complete your grid LO5 Understand the nutritional needs of children D5 In small groups research the nutritional needs of children aged:-
  94. 94. The Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) 2012 • Under the Early Learning Goals, one of the prime areas is physical development and this includes health and self-care and states that ‘Children should know the importance of a healthy diet.’ • How can we provide this? • Describe food and drink requirements in relation to current frameworks look at your copy of the statutory framework section 3 3.47, 3.48, 3.49 • Look at national food standards (need for schools to provide fruit and vegetables) D5
  95. 95. True or False Game
  96. 96. Group activity D5 Time: 15 mins Class debate Motion: Breastfeeding is always better than bottle feeding. Divide yourselves into two groups. • One group will research the arguments in favour of breastfeeding. • One group will research the arguments in favour of formula feeding. • You will then conduct a debate on the motion above. • You will need to agree the rules of the debate with your tutor.
  97. 97. • Babies get the vitamins that they need from breast milk or infant formula milk. But by the time they are six months old, their need for vitamins increases. • Babies are born with nutrients that they have acquired while in the womb; these help to provide some of the nutrients that they will need. The rest is provided by milk. From 0–4 months, the best form of nutrient is breast milk/formula-feed/a combination of both. Nutritional requirements © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO5 Understand the nutritional needs of children D5
  98. 98. • Babies should not be weaned until they are 6 months old. The Department of Health currently recommends that infants should be breastfed (if possible) until they are 6 months old. After this age, breast or formula milk alone will no longer be sufficient to meet the baby’s nutritional needs. • Babies will slowly be introduced to age and stage appropriate food from the age of 6 months and this will include puréed food with no added salt or sugar. Nutritional requirements © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO5 Understand the nutritional needs of children D5
  99. 99. D5 • It is important to wash your hands thoroughly before preparing formula feeds. • Ensure that all equipment you use has been sterilised. • You should use boiled water at a temperature of 70ᵒC or above, as this kills off the bacteria. • Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions. • After feeding, throw away any unused formula feed. Preparing formula feeds
  100. 100. Time: 15 mins • With your tutor, practise making up some formula feeds in the classroom. • In pairs, observe and support each other in ensuring that good hygienic practice is followed. • Use your hand-out provided to support you with this. D5
  101. 101. D5 • Babies’ immune systems are not fully developed and so they are more susceptible to germs and bacteria than we are. Sterilising feeding equipment is, therefore, vital. • As soon as the baby has finished feeding, the feeding bottle and teat should be washed in hot, soapy water. • All equipment should be washed in cold, clean water just before sterilising. • Equipment can be sterilised using any of the following methods – cold water sterilising solution, steam (microwave or electric steriliser) or boiling. • Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions. • Remember to always wash your hands before carrying out sterilising procedures. Sterilising equipment
  102. 102. Empty your formula Wash your bottle toughly in hot soapy water Sterilise your bottle using cold water method Steam steriliser Produce a hand out to inform new mothers of the correct way to make up formula feeds include an explanation of how to sterilise the equipment after the baby has taken their feed. D5 Sterilising equipment
  103. 103. Classroom discussion activity Watch the clips note down your thoughts on:- Baby led weaning https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCQeAtLM7EE Traditional weaning https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X_ADZ15a1a4
  104. 104. D5 • Babies get the vitamins that they need from breast milk or infant formula milk. But by the time they are six months old their need for vitamins increases. • Their birth store of iron will be becoming depleted – so an outside source will be necessary. • Important points when planning a weaning programme: • Be patient • Only introduce one food at a time • Never leave the baby alone when feeding. • Liaise with the baby’s parents or carers when planning a weaning programme. Explain how to plan a weaning programme (continued)
  105. 105. • Babies need a lot of energy and nutrients as they grow very quickly in their first year – they will triple their birth weight and their length will increase by 50%. • There are four stages to weaning : Stage 1 6 months Stage 2 6–9 months Stage 3 9–12 months Stage 4 12 months and older D5 Explain how to plan a weaning programme Find out about the suggested foods for each stage and how to prepare them. Don’t forget that you should liaise with the child’s parents or carers. Use the textbook and the websites provided to help you.
  106. 106. Produce an information leaflet to give to new parents/ carers to inform them of how to wean their baby Include government guidelines and the four stages of weaning. Directed Study Task
  107. 107. Assignment Task C1, D5 To achieve C1 you are required to produce a poster to the explain that you understand:- • the main food groups • the role and function of nutrients and vitamins. To achieve D5 you are required to produce a table giving information that identifies the changing nutritional requirements of children birth to 7 years to include: • benefits of breast feeding • correct make-up of formula and safe practices (including sterilisation of equipment) • weaning process • the main food groups, nutrients and vitamins and their role in the body • menus to provide well balanced diet • food and drink requirements within current frameworks.
  108. 108. Unit 2 Children’s Health and well- being
  109. 109. • Identify role of the practitioner in meeting children’s individual dietary requirements • Describe the impact a poor diet would have on the child • Explain the role of the early years practitioner in meeting children’s individual dietary requirements and encouraging healthy eating. C2 • Explain the impacts of poor diet on children’s health and well-being in the: • short term • long term. B2 © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  110. 110. • Practitioners need to liaise with parents in order to be aware of any allergies or specific cultural or religious requirements. They should ensure that they have regard for these when they are providing snacks or planning an activity involving food. • Practitioners should always have regard for the importance of diet to children’s development. • They should also ensure that they consider the following: • Children’s rights • Welfare of children • Long-term effects of diet. What are the benefits of working with parents/ carers to meet children’s dietary requirements? The role of the early years practitioner © Hodder & Stoughton Limited Understand the nutritional needs of children C2
  111. 111. Pairs activity Time: 15 mins What is the role of the practitioner in meeting children’s individual dietary requirements? Consider: • Children’s rights • Current frameworks • The welfare of children • Long-term effects on children • Providing a good role model. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO5 Understand the nutritional needs of children C2
  112. 112. In the short term, a poor diet can lead to: • Malnutrition, which can cause poor growth and physical development – a failure to gain height and weight • Loss of concentration • Tiredness • Increased susceptibility to infections • Tooth decay – caused by sugary foods • Bleeding gums • Poor skin and hair condition • Obesity. LO6 Understand the impact of poor diet on children’s health and well-being B2 The impact of poor diet on children’s health and well-being © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  113. 113. Classroom discussion activity Time: 15 mins Discuss how the short-term issues may have an impact in the long term. • Consider how they may impact on a person’s health, mental and social well-being. • How can loss of concentration impact on health and development in the long term? • What is the difference between malnutrition and under- nutrition? © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO6 Understand the impact of poor diet on children’s health and well-being B2
  114. 114. In the long term, a poor diet can lead to: • Heart conditions, diabetes, and emotional and social problems, which can all be caused by obesity. • Weak immune system, osteoporosis and diabetes, which can be caused by malnutrition. • Poor health, which may lead to a loss in income, as the adult may be unable to work. Remember: eating habits developed in childhood set the foundations for the habits of the adult. The impact of poor diet on children’s health and well-being © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO6 Understand the impact of poor diet on children’s health and well-being B2
  115. 115. • Cultural variations in diet match up activity Create a poster to highlight: • benefits of working in partnership with parents/carers to meet children’s dietary requirements • medical factors affecting diet; allergies, intolerances, religious and cultural preferences • A range of strategies to encourage children to make healthy choices. • recognising children's preferences and interests. Task
  116. 116. Extension activity Time: 15 mins 1. What is the difference between a food allergy and a food intolerance? • Research the symptoms of an allergic reaction and what you, as a practitioner, should do if a child has one. 2. What is anaphylaxis? • Research this and what to do if a child has an anaphylactic shock. 3. Why is gelatine banned in some religions? • Research the use of gelatine in sweets. Identify the role of the practitioner in supporting individual dietary requirements. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO5 Understand the nutritional needs of children C2
  117. 117. 1. Plan a daily menu for a baby. 2. Plan a weekly menu for a pre-school child. 3. Plan a weekly menu for a school-age child (5–7 years). © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  118. 118. Assignment Task C2,B2 To achieve C2 you are required to add to your poster to explain the role of the early years practitioner to meet children’s individual dietary requirements and the use of strategies to encourage children to eat healthily, to include: • benefits of working in partnership with parents/carers to meet children’s dietary requirements • medical factors affecting diet; allergies, intolerances, religious and cultural preferences • a range of strategies to encourage children to make healthy choices. • recognising children's preferences and interests. To achieve B2 you are required to provide an explanation of the impacts of poor diet on children’s health and well-being in the: • short term • long term.
  119. 119. Unit 2 Children’s Health and well- being
  120. 120. Starter activity Starter - Shake up cards Pick one of the shake up cards available In pairs complete the given activity and note how this may benefit a child in your care? Feedback your feeling to the whole group
  121. 121. LO7 Understand children’s need for exercise. • Identify the benefits of exercise for: • The respiratory system • The digestive system • Social development • Physical development • Explain benefits of exercise for children’s health and well- being. B1 • Plan opportunities/activities for children to exercise. C5 © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  122. 122. Starter activity Benefits https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U4T8kXRVwTM Make notes on your post it of our findings from the clip
  123. 123. Starter activity Post it B1 Post your answers on the board feedback ! How many benefits have been identified? Take a photo!
  124. 124. B1 There are lots of benefits to children of regular exercise. Physical development • Helps control body fat • Develops stronger muscles and bones • Encourages hand/eye coordination. Social development • Boosts self esteem • Develops confidence • Encourages children to feel good about themselves. The benefits of exercise for children
  125. 125. B1 Cognitive development: • improves sleep quality • boosts memory • enhances your mood. Children who exercise regularly are: • less likely to be overweight • likely to have more energy. Exercise will also have long term benefits: • It can help reduce illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes etc. The benefits of exercise for children (cont’d)
  126. 126. Lets take a look at the EYFS ! C5 EYFS Physical development is one of the three prime areas in the areas of learning and development. The EYFS states that ‘Physical development involves providing young children with opportunities to be active and interactive, and to develop their coordination, control and movement.’ (EYFS Framework DFE 2012) United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child The UNCRC recognises that all children should have the right to an education which develops their physical abilities alongside all their other areas of development. The requirements of current frameworks
  127. 127. When you are planning an exercise activity for an outdoor space, you would need to consider the following: • Children’s individual needs • Learning outcomes (what you want the children to learn) – refer to the EYFS • The children’s age and stage of development – is the activity age appropriate? • Inclusive practice • Health and safety • Challenge • Relevant setting policy and procedures. Planning activities and opportunities for exercise © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO7 Understand children’s need for exercise C5
  128. 128. Pairs activity Time: 15 mins Consider the following questions. 1. How can outdoor provision provide for: • Challenging children? • Developing imaginations? • Providing choice? • Providing risk? • Ensuring safety? 2. Do all outdoor activities involve exercise? © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO7 Understand children’s need for exercise C5
  129. 129. Points to consider when implementing your activity: • Is the activity you have planned age appropriate? • Is it appealing to children, for example, is it fun? • What will they learn from this? Are there any other related skills that they will learn, for example, social skills? • Does the activity address risk and challenge? • What resources do you need? • Are there any children that you may have to make modifications for (differentiation)? You should: • Demonstrate an understanding of the practitioner’s role • Show how you have considered equality and diversity • Implement the activity in your setting. Planning activities and opportunities for exercise © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO7 Understand children’s need for exercise C5
  130. 130. • The age of the children you are carrying out your activity with ? • What will they learn from this? Are there any other related skills that they will learn, for example, social skills? • Does the activity address risk and challenge? • The resources you will need? • Are there any children that you may have to make modifications for (differentiation)? You should: • Demonstrate an understanding of the practitioner’s role • Show how you have considered equality and diversity Lets Get Planning C5 Use your activity plan to produce an activity to carry out at placement this will form part of your first observation, Please ensure that you include:-
  131. 131. Extension activity Time: 15 mins Does free-flow play encourage children to exercise more? • Refer back to the notes that you made during the Classroom discussion activity. • Research free-flow play. • Outline arguments in favour of, and against, free-flow play. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO7 Understand children’s need for exercise B1, C5
  132. 132. 1. Find out about the ‘Wake Up Shake Up’ programme. 2. Explain how you would incorporate this into the daily routine at your setting. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  133. 133. Assignment Task B1, C5 To achieve C5 you are required to produce three activity plans providing opportunities/activities for children to exercise for children aged 0-2 years, 2-3 years and 3-5 years that accurately consider: • age appropriateness • the potential value and benefits for children • the role of the early years practitioner. To achieve B1 you are required to add explanation on your activity plan of benefits of exercise for children’s health and well-being must demonstrate clear understanding of benefits for: • the respiratory system • the digestive system • social development • physical development • a sense of well-being.

×