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U1 lesson1[lo1]

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U1 lesson1[lo1]

  1. 1. Unit 1 Child development from conception to seven Years
  2. 2. LO1. Understand development from conception to end of gestation Time: 10 mins • Complete the word search • Write a meaning for each of the words found • Discuss these with a partner
  3. 3. Learning outcomes • Identify the important stages of pregnancy • Describe stages of development from conception to birth (D1)
  4. 4. • Pregnancy is counted from first day of the mother’s last period • Pregnancy last 37 to 42 weeks (the average is 40 weeks) • By 12 weeks of pregnancy the foetus will be fully formed • Pregnancy is divided into three trimesters • At 28 weeks the foetus is considered ‘viable’ • Lets see what this looks like in action! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R-lrEBevJ60 D1 1.1 What are the Important stages of pregnancy ?
  5. 5. Time: 20 mins In pairs Research on the internet for images of stages of development from fertilisation to the end of gestation and make a timeline. D1 1.1 http://www.nhs.uk/condi tions/pregnancy-and- baby/pages/pregnancy- and-baby-care.aspx#close
  6. 6. Time: 10 mins As a group present your timeline you have produced discuss as a class the various stages of development. D1 1.1
  7. 7. Time: 15 mins In small groups read the scenario below then answer and discuss the questions. Holly and David have been attempting to have a baby together. Holly’s menstrual cycle lasts 28 days. This month Holly missed her period and it is now two weeks past the usual date this happens. Is it possible that Holly is pregnant? • Describe what has been happening to the ovum since it was released from the ovary D1 1.1
  8. 8. Group activity https://flipquiz.me/review/102886 FLIP QUIZ
  9. 9. To achieve D1 you are required to design a timeline to describe the stages of development from conception to birth. When designing your timeline you are required to include images and brief descriptions for each stage. Assignment Task D1
  10. 10. Unit 1 Child development from conception to seven Years
  11. 11. Starter activity Time: 10 minutes • List as many reasons that you can think that will effect development from pre-conception to birth • Share with a partner
  12. 12. Learning outcomes • Identify lifestyle factors in which could affect the health and well-being of mother / baby • Describe factors that may impact upon the development of the baby during pre pre- conception, pregnancy and first year of life (D2)
  13. 13. Pairs activity Time: 15 minutes In pairs Discuss what effects the pre-conception factors identified can have on the development of a baby. Write the feedback of your discussions on the padlet provided on Oracle https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ogzsnpVSTRk D2 Alcohol Smoking Drugs (medical and recreational) Diet Vitamins
  14. 14. Many pre-conception factors can affect the development of a baby, such as: • Alcohol • Smoking • Drugs (medical and recreational) • Diet • Vitamins D2 Pre-conception experiences
  15. 15. • Some women can suffer from complications during their pregnancy, these can include vaginal bleeding, preterm labour, pre-eclampsia • Other infections can be dangerous to the pregnant women and her unborn child these include parvovirus (‘slapped cheek’), chickenpox, German measles (rubella) and toxoplasmosis • Infections of the urinary tract are common in pregnancy • Complete your given case studies in your Pairs, • Feedback to the group. D2 Complications in pregnancy
  16. 16. Classroom discussion activity Time: 20 mins From the discussions you have had in pairs, come together as a class and discuss what each pair thought. So what does a normal birth look like? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xath6kOf0NE D2
  17. 17. • Labour has three stages, each stage is important and if not carried out correctly can affect the baby’s development . • The expulsion of the placenta usually follows within 30 minutes of delivery and is the third stage of birth. D2 Birth experiences
  18. 18. Pre-birth experiences can also have an effect on development these experiences could be the following: • Foetal monitoring and foetal distress • Checking amniotic fluid signs of meconium • Abnormal labour • Assisted delivery D2 Pre-birth experiences
  19. 19. Group activity Time: 10 mins In Pairs/ three’s you will each be given a pre-birth experience to research and feed back to your group. • Abnormal labour • Assisted delivery -Forceps, Vacuum. • Caesarean Section • Birth Trauma • Premature Birth • Post Term Birth • Feedback can be given in the form of poster or power point presentation. D2
  20. 20. • A new mother will be observed for signs of post-natal depression. This can affect them in many ways and the symptoms can be very serious if they go undetected. • 10–15% of new mothers will suffer from post-natal depression. • Post-natal psychosis is a severe form of post-natal depression and is relatively rare with 0.1–0.2% of new mothers suffering. D2 Post-natal depression
  21. 21. Independent research activity Time: 15 mins • Read your given articles note the signs and symptoms a new mother may show that indicate that she may be suffering from post-natal depression. • What are the biggest factors of post natal depression? • What can be the effect of post-natal depression on the mother and the baby? • What treatments are available? D2
  22. 22. • Good communication between the health care professionals and the mothers is essential. • The information given to new mothers should be personalised to their individual needs. • The post-natal care period is the first 6–8 weeks. D2 Professional conduct
  23. 23. Babies in which are born before 38 weeks are classed as premature meaning:- • They find it difficult to control their temperature • They find it difficult to breath as the lungs may not be fully formed • Resistance to infection is poor due to having a low immune system as they have not had enough time in the uterus to acquire antibodies to prevent infection • They may have jaundice as their liver has not yet fully developed • Discuss with the person next to you how might this effect baby in their first year of life Take notes on how being born prematurely may impact on a child’s development http://www.nhs.uk/video/Pages/how-will-my-premature-baby- develop.aspx
  24. 24. Use your laminated cards write what you think the effects on the child’s development would be for:- Babies born before 37 weeks Biological factors Poverty Social Factors Pre-natal factors Task
  25. 25. Extension activity Time: 15 mins • Design a leaflet to support a new mother through the post- natal period, include information on: • checks on the baby • checks on the mother • available support . D2
  26. 26. http://flipquiz.me/review/52844
  27. 27. Time: 15 mins • Create a booklet to explain to parents the potential effects on development caused by pre-conception experiences, and about the various types of assisted delivery and why they are used. D2 Directed Study Task
  28. 28. Group activity To achieve D2 you required to produce a written account to describe factors that may impact upon the development of the baby during Pre-conception Each stage of pregnancy During first year of life. (at least half a page for each) Assignment Task D2
  29. 29. Unit 1 Child development from conception to seven Years
  30. 30. Starter Activity Q AND A Use your buzzers grab your chance to earn Do jo points!!
  31. 31. Learning outcomes • Explain routine checks to be carried out during (C1) • Antenatal care • Postnatal care • First year of life
  32. 32. • Before antenatal care was first arranged the death rate was high among women and their babies • Antenatal care helps improve the health of pregnant women and their babies and supports the mother in preparing for her baby • Once the women thinks she is pregnant she visits her doctor to confirm her pregnancy and from then on will be seen regularly by a GP or midwife C1 Antenatal development checks
  33. 33. Time: 15 mins • Research antenatal checks that a women has each time she has an antenatal visit to the GP or midwife. • Research each test and the reasons for them. • Group one - First - trimester – (conception to 13 weeks) • Group two - Second - trimester- (14 weeks to 27 weeks) • Group three - Third trimester- (28 weeks through the end of your pregnancy) • Produce a poster to present your findings to the group! C1
  34. 34. Time: 10 mins Using the information you have gathered from your independent research, work in small groups to share your information and discuss and answer the following questions http://flipquiz.me/review/52098 http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/ pregnancy-and-baby/pages/ ultrasound-anomaly-baby-scans- pregnant.aspx#close C1
  35. 35. • A pregnant woman will meet a number of professionals, which can include a midwife, community midwife, general practitioner (GP) and obstetrician. • Its common in the first two months of pregnancy for the mother to feel nausea, have breast tenderness and urinate frequently. • In late pregnancy swelling of the hands and feet, heartburn and constipation are common. • Its advisable that during the first three months of pregnancy medication is avoid unless absolutely necessary. Complete your given case study C1 During Pregnancy
  36. 36. Time: 15 mins • Create an advice sheet to inform pregnant women of the antenatal care that they will receive during their pregnancy. • Include information on why it is important this care is given and that the pregnant women attend. C1
  37. 37. • The mother will be assessed by a midwife before she leaves hospital for the ‘baby blues’, any pain or fatigue, • the midwife will then check with the new mother again six weeks after the baby’s birth • This check will look at weight, urine testing , blood pressure and a breast check • Mothers will be offered rubella vaccination if they were found to be not immune during their pregnancy http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/pregnancy-and- baby/Pages/postnatal-check.aspx#close C1 Post-natal care
  38. 38. Classroom discussion activity Time: 10 mins • Discuss the importance of the post-natal checks for the Mother and baby. C1
  39. 39. Before the baby goes home the paediatrician will check for: • Jaundice, thrush, nappy rash, that baby has passed meconium and is not constipated or has diarrhoea. • The baby will also will weighed and have a hearing screening. • How well the baby is feeding will be monitored. • After ten days baby will be discharged from the midwife’s care to that of the health visitor. C1 Before the baby goes home
  40. 40. Group activity Time: 15 mins • Each group will be given a post-natal check. Find out about this check, gathering as much information as you can. • Share your group’s information with the other groups via padlet. • Puerperium – Group 1 http://patient.info/doctor/postnatal-care- puerperium • The Post natal check six weeks after birth – Group 2 http://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pregnancy-and- baby/pages/postnatal-check.aspx#close • The baby’s six-week check – Group 3 http://www.babycentre.co.uk/a1047814/your-postnatal-check C1
  41. 41. The new-born baby will have a number of observations and checks in its first hours of life these will include: • Apgar score http://www.babycenter.com/2_newborn-apgar- test_10300050.bc • Observations of limbs and head • Skin • Stools – meconium • Eyes • Umbilical cord • Weight, length, head circumference C1 New-born Observations and Checks
  42. 42. Pairs activity Time: 10 mins • Discuss why you think these observations and checks are carried out on a new-born. • What is the importance of these observations checks? C1
  43. 43. Newborn babies also have a number of screenings carried out. • Guthrie test – performed on the seventh day to detect phenylketonuria (PKU) and cystic fibrosis – this is a heel prick to obtain a sample of blood. • Barlow’s test – check by the midwife then the paediatrician to check for congenital dislocation of the hips. This test will be repeated by the health visitor and GP at the 6 week developmental check. C1 Newborn Screening
  44. 44. Classroom discussion activity Time: 15 mins • Discuss and feed back from the pairs activity. Talk about the reasons and importance of the checks and observations carried out on a new-born. • Share your thoughts on the screenings. • Discuss if you think other screens, checks and observations should be carried out on the new-born. C1
  45. 45. • All babies in England will be given a Personal Child Health Record (PCHR), this is has a red cover and is often referred to as ‘the red book’. • This will track the baby's progress and is shared between all the professionals • The red book will record the babies height and weight on a centile chart. • It will record all the baby’s immunisations. C1 Personal Child Health Record (PCHR)
  46. 46. Independent research activity Time: 20 mins • Research what a centile chart is and why and how it is used. • Discuss with the rest of the group your findings. Understand developmental checks from birth to 12 months In pairs use tape measures and centile chart to plot your own measurement’s on the chart
  47. 47. Time: 15 mins • Produce an information leaflet to explain all of the observations, checks, screenings and immunisations that are given to a baby from birth until they are one year old. Directed Study task C1
  48. 48. Plenary Activity Time: 10 mins • Tell me a story Conception to gestation Effects of birth experiences Post Natal Care Developmental checks Fertilisation Pre-conception experiences Mother / Baby Neonatal screening test Antenatal checks Pre-birth experiences Concerns the parent may have Developmental review Outcomes of antenatal checks Birth experiences GP Examantion
  49. 49. Assignment Task C1 To achieve C1 you are required to design an information leaflet for new parents to explain to them about the routine checks carried out during antenatal care, postnatal care and the first year of life, remember to add pictures and give reasons why checks are necessary.
  50. 50. Unit 1 Child development from conception to seven Years
  51. 51. Starter Activity Reflect on your grid from enrolment day Peer Assess Age Social / Emotional Physical Intellectual /Cognitive Communication /Language New-born One month old
  52. 52. Learning outcomes • Identify stages and sequences of development from birth to seven years in the following areas: • Cognition • Speech, language and communication • Physical development • Personal, social and emotional development. D3
  53. 53. Cognitive development is the child learning to interact with the world around them. Part of this process of development involves understanding abstract ideas, for example, the concept of green. How do you know that This… This… And this… are all green? Stages of cognitive development in children from birth to seven years © Hodder & Stoughton Limited D3
  54. 54. Piaget identified four areas of development; the first two cover birth to seven years. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited D3 Stages of cognitive development in children from birth to seven years https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TRF27F2b n-A
  55. 55. • Babies communicate their needs from the moment they are born. • Initially, their communication is a series of different cries and facial expressions. • Babies and young children soon learn to communicate their needs in a variety of ways. • All children are individual, so although there is an expected pattern of development, all children will develop at their own rate. Speech, language and communication development © Hodder & Stoughton Limited D3
  56. 56. • There is rapid growth in the first two years of a child’s life. This is when their growth will be monitored – health professionals will weigh and measure them. • A baby will double its birth weight by 5 months. It will triple its birth weight by its first birthday and have grown 50% in length. • By 2 years old, children will have reached half their adult height. • At birth, the bones of a baby’s skull are not fused together – this will happen during their first two years. By the time they are 2 years old, their brain will be three-quarters the weight and size of an adult’s. Physical development © Hodder & Stoughton Limited D3
  57. 57. • The first seven years of a child’s life are influential on their personal development, as on all other areas of development. This is the period of their life when they are learning and absorbing the most. • Personal development is about children beginning to understand themselves – who they are, what they can do, developing a sense of self. • Children develop self-confidence and self-awareness, and they move from being egocentric to being able to understand the world from another’s point of view. Personal, social and emotional development © Hodder & Stoughton Limited D3
  58. 58. • Social development is about the social skills that we need to live alongside other people – it is about the growth of relationships with others. • Babies start to develop social skills in their first year when they engage in eye contact and play games such as peek-a-boo. • By 2 years old, children will engage in parallel play (playing alongside other children, but not with them). They are beginning to be aware of the world beyond themselves. • By the 3 years old, children will start to play cooperatively and social skills such as turn-taking are developing. • Between 4 and 7 years, playing with other children becomes more important and children develop stable friendships. Personal, social and emotional development © Hodder & Stoughton Limited D3
  59. 59. • Babies have a need to develop a strong bond with their primary carer, so the first year is very important for their emotional development. • Children need the reassurance of the presence of their carer. • Children may need their comforter with them to reassure them. • Children can become easily frustrated by the limitations of their physical or language skills, sometimes resulting in temper tantrums. These will lessen as their skills develop. • As children get older and develop friendships, these can be a source of emotional upset. Young children will ‘fall out’ with their best friends, see it as the end of the world, and ask the practitioner to intercede, only to be best friends again five minutes later. Personal, social and emotional development © Hodder & Stoughton Limited D3
  60. 60. • Babies communicate their needs from the moment they are born. • Initially, their communication is a series of different cries and facial expressions. • Babies and young children soon learn to communicate their needs in a variety of ways. • All children are individual, so although there is an expected pattern of development, all children will develop at their own rate. Speech, language and communication development © Hodder & Stoughton Limited D3
  61. 61. Task D3 Have you Completed your given grid on cognitive development ? Age Social / Emotional Physical Intellectual /Cognitive Communication /Language New-born One month old
  62. 62. 1. What is meant by the term ‘cognitive development’? 2. How do newborn babies communicate their needs? 3. At what age have children reached half their adult height? 4. Why do many 2 year olds have temper tantrums? © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  63. 63. Assignment Task D3 To achieve D3 you are required to submit your areas of development grid identifying the stages and sequences of development from birth to seven years in the following areas: Social Physical Cognitive Communication and language Personal and emotional. (at least 3 points for each age and stage is required)
  64. 64. Unit 1 Child development from conception to seven Years
  65. 65. Starter activity LO2 Understand stages and sequences of development from birth to seven years D4 Time: 10 mins What do you need to keep you going on a day-to-day basis? Consider: • Physical needs • Emotional needs • Social needs • Personal needs • Cognitive needs. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  66. 66. LO2 Understand stages and sequences of development from birth to seven years. • Identify the term ‘holistic’ • Explain holistic development. D4 • Identify the difference between sequence and rate of development • Describe neurological and brain development in children • Explain factors which influence children’s development. C3 © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  67. 67. When you look for a synonym for the word ‘holistic’, you will find words including: • Rounded • Full • Complete • Whole • General • Universal. • Use the hand out provided to explain the term ‘holistic’ using at least two of these words Holistic development © Hodder & Stoughton Limited D4
  68. 68. D4 Sequence of development is ?? Rate of development is ?? Brain development activity
  69. 69. • Scientists used to think that babies were born with a limited capacity for learning, that they were born with a certain number of brain cells and that there wasn’t the facility for further development. • More recent research suggests that a baby is influenced by its environment and that intelligence depends on the connections between nerve cells. These are influenced by the quality of the educational environment. Neurological and brain development © Hodder & Stoughton Limited D4
  70. 70. • A longitudinal study (conducted over 20 years) found that there was a correlation between the amount of mental stimulation that a child receives at the age of four and the cortex development (dedicated to language and cognition) in their late teens. • The cerebral cortex plays a key role in memory, attention, perceptual awareness, thought, language and consciousness. • The research concluded that other factors, such as parental nurturing and cognitive stimulation at the age of eight, had no effect on development later in life (Martha Farah, 2000). Neurological and brain development © Hodder & Stoughton Limited D4 http://fareham.mrooms.net/ course/view.php?id=174&se ction=2
  71. 71. Assignment Task D4 To achieve D4 you are required to complete a written account which will explain ‘holistic development’. Please use hand out provided in the lesson and answer all with examples.
  72. 72. Illness and accident can affect children’s development in the short term. They can mean that a child may be absent from school and miss out on learning. • If a child has a contagious illness, they will be excluded from the setting for the required length of time, but it should not affect their development in the long term. • An accident such as a broken leg may mean some absence, however, when the child returns to school they may find that they are temporarily restricted in the activities that they can participate in, for example, PE. Factors which affect children’s development in the short term © Hodder & Stoughton Limited C3
  73. 73. Pairs activity Time: 15 mins A contagious illnesses will result in exclusion from the setting for a period of time. Consider: • How a child may feel when they return to school after a prolonged absence. • How may this impact, in the short term, on development? • What can the practitioner do to ease the return for the child? © Hodder & Stoughton Limited C3
  74. 74. Lifestyle Children who do not take much exercise tend to become inactive adults. Obesity is more common in children who take little exercise. Nutrition Poor diet can lead to musculoskeletal problems or cardiovascular disease. There could be a high risk of weight problems in adulthood, and obesity can result in diabetes and heart conditions. Eating habits developed in childhood are likely to be continued into adult life. Pollution High levels of air pollution can affect the development of the lungs. Factors which affect children’s development in the long term © Hodder & Stoughton Limited C3
  75. 75. Poverty Children growing up in poverty are statistically more likely to have accidents, some of which can have long-term effects. ‘Developmental delay in early childhood, particularly delay in speech and language, is associated with social disadvantage.’ www.endchildpoverty.org.uk/files/Health_consequences_of_Poverty_for_chil dren.pdf. Housing There is a link between poor housing and poverty. ‘There is evidence of a direct link between housing conditions in childhood and later health problems, or even death, in some studies.’ http://england.shelter.org.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0016/39202/Chance_of _a_Lifetime.pdf Factors which affect children’s development in the long term © Hodder & Stoughton Limited C3
  76. 76. Independent research activity Time: 15 mins Research: Group 1 • The factors which affect children’s development in the short term. Group 2 • The factors which affect children’s development in the long term. Make notes and prepare to share them in the Group activity. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited C3
  77. 77. Time: 15 mins Share the research that you carried out in the Independent research activity with your group. Design two posters: • One to explain the factors that affect children’s development in the short term and explain how the factors affect development. • One to explain the factors that affect children’s development in the long term and explain how the factors affect development. Present your posters to the rest of the class. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited C3 Task
  78. 78. To achieve C3 you are required to complete a colourful poster which will explain factors that influence children’s development. Make sure you add at least 6 factors including how the identified factor affects development. Assignment Task C3
  79. 79. Unit 1 Child development from conception to seven Years
  80. 80. Starter activity LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B1 Time: 10 mins Write down your own definition of the following terms using only one sentence for each: • Cognitive development • Speech, language and communication development • Physical development • Social and emotional development. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  81. 81. LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice. • Describe theoretical perspectives in relation to: B1 • cognitive development • speech, language and communication development • physical development • social and emotional development. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  82. 82. You will work with your partner to research your given theorist You can use the information within this power point, books and resources in which you can find on Oracle I have also placed a selection of books in the classroom You may present your feedback to the group as role play, poster or power point format Please ensure you reference your sources of information Please complete the given hand-out when listening to the presentations from your class mates Pairs Activity
  83. 83. Lev Vygotsky • Vygotsky believed that cognitive development relies on social interaction with other people. • He developed the zone of proximal development theory (ZPD). This theory identifies what the child can do independently and what they can do with assistance; it highlights their potential. Theoretical perspectives in relation to cognitive development TASK DIFFICULTY easy hard Solves problem Solves problem Cannot solve problem Independently with assistance/scaffolding (actual level) (potential level) © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B1
  84. 84. Lev Vygotsky • Social interaction and language are key to Vygotsky’s ZPD theory. • He believed that the gap between what the child could do independently (for example, put their shoes on) and what they could do with assistance from a more knowledgeable other (MKO) (for example, tie up their laces) was the zone where learning occurred. • The ZPD is the distance between the child’s ability to solve a task with support and their ability to solve the problem independently. • The MKO could be a teacher or a peer, or anyone who has more understanding or ability than the learner. Theoretical perspectives in relation to cognitive development © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B1
  85. 85. Piaget identified four stages of cognitive development: 1. Sensorimotor 0–2 years: This is when babies explore their world through their senses and develop schemas. Object permanence – this is when a baby does not understand that an object still exists when it is out of sight. 2. Pre-operational 2–7 years: Children are egocentric. They begin to use symbols and learn through ‘pretend’ play. Children are egocentric, and cannot see things from another person’s point of view. Theoretical perspectives in relation to cognitive development © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practicE B1
  86. 86. 3. Concrete operations 7–11 years: Children begin to apply rules and strategies to their thinking. Children are now able to conserve, i.e., although an object changes its appearance, its quantity remains the same. 4. Formal operations 11–15 years: Children can think in abstract forms. Children are able to think logically and work in abstract forms. (Continued from previous slide.) © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B1
  87. 87. Noam Chomsky • Chomsky believed that children are born with specific linguistic knowledge, that they have an innate ability to acquire language. He called this the Language Acquisition Device (LAD). His theory is classed as the ‘Nativist’ perspective. • Chomsky believed that the optimal age for learning language was between 3 and 10; after this he believed it is very difficult, if not impossible, to learn language. • Chomsky thought that children would still learn to speak even with little, or no, adult support. Theoretical perspectives in relation to speech, language and communication development © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B1
  88. 88. Burrhus Skinner • Skinner’s theory follows the learning perspective, he argues that language development is based on conditioning. • His theory of behaviourism is central to his theory of how children learn language. • He believed that language is learned by reward, for example, when babies say ‘da da’ they are praised, but adults don’t reinforce sounds that they don’t recognise. • He thought that language developed through imitation and reinforcement. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B1
  89. 89. Lev Vygotsky • Unlike Piaget, Vygotsky believed that language is necessary for learning and precedes cognitive development. • He thought that children developed speech and language skills to serve as social skills and once these were internalised they led to higher thinking skills. • Vygotsky believed that language had two functions – it is how they receive information and how they develop thought. • He thought that children had ‘private’ or internal speech – when they talk to themselves as they are engrossed in an activity, for instance. This private speech eventually becomes internalised (inner speech) and that thought is the result of language. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B1
  90. 90. Arnold Gessell • Gessell was one of the first theorists to identify developmental milestones – he called them ‘Gessell developmental schedules’. • He developed the maturational theory, which suggests that children’s development is due to their biological makeup and that environment has only a small influence. Theoretical perspectives in relation to physical development © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B1
  91. 91. Jerome Bruner • Bruner, like Vygotsky, emphasises the importance of social interaction in the learning of language. • He identified three modes of representation: 1. Learning through doing 2. Learning through recording 3. Symbolic mode when children use symbols to represent something. These symbols can be pictures, models, words or numbers, among other things. • Bruner felt that language is important in order to help children to deal with abstract concepts. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B1
  92. 92. John Bowlby • Social development is closely linked to emotional development. It is through relationships that young children learn how to understand their emotions. • Bowlby believed that the first relationships that children make are very important and continue to influence their social relationships in later life. • Bowlby thought that if this bond was broken or disrupted (e.g. through a prolonged time in hospital) within the first 2½ years, this could have long-term negative consequences. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B1 Theoretical perspectives in relation to social and emotional development
  93. 93. Pairs activity Time: 15 mins Consider the following scenarios and how theories of language development relate to each: A child spends much of her time playing by herself in your pre-school. She chatters away to herself and appears happy. Should you encourage her to play with other children? How does Vygotsky’s theory relate to her? A baby is born to parents who are hearing and speech impaired. How are they able to reinforce the baby’s language? How would Skinner’s theory relate to her? A child has just arrived in the UK from abroad. He speaks no English and has started school in Year 5. How would Chomsky’s theory relate to him? © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B1
  94. 94. Research the following theorist’s please refer to these when writing up your assignment remember to reference your work. Piaget’s work on schemas. • Explain what he meant by schemas. • List the different schemas that he identified. • Provide an example of a schema – maybe one that you have observed in your setting – and explain how it is an example of the schema chosen. • Consider how schemas can inform planning. • Cathy Nut-brown – the importance of learning through play • Anna Craft - creativity and positive thinking. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B1 Directed Study activity
  95. 95. Extension activity Time: 15 mins A case study • Describe a typical 5-year-old child (you can describe an imaginary child or one you have worked with). • Explain their strengths and weaknesses. • Choose one of the areas of development and one theorist. • Now describe your child in relation to the area of development that you have chosen. • Imagine that you are the theorist. Explain the child’s learning, behaviour and development so far, through your theory. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B1
  96. 96. 1. Complete the grid on theory’s of development? 2. Theory match up activity © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  97. 97. Group activity To achieve B1 you are required to complete a written account to accurately describe a theory for each of the following theoretical perspectives. Cognitive development Speech, language and communication development Physical development Social and emotional development Assignment Task B1
  98. 98. Unit 1 Child development from conception to seven Years
  99. 99. Starter activity LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B2 Time: 10 mins Name that theory! Bandura Skinner Vygotsky Chomsky Harter Gessell Piaget © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  100. 100. LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice. • Identify current frameworks within early years practice • Describe what these current frameworks are • Explain how theoretical perspectives relating to child development inform current frameworks. B2 © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  101. 101. • The EYFS aims to work in partnership with parents, providing equality of opportunity and a secure foundation through learning and development opportunities, which are planned around the needs and interests of each individual child (EYFS 2012). • The EYFS recognises that every child is unique, that they learn best through positive relationships in enabling environments and that they will learn in different ways and at different rates. • There are seven areas of learning and development, but the three prime areas include ‘Communication and language’. • Children have an assessment check between the ages of 2–3 years old. Current frameworks – Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B2
  102. 102. • The importance of physical development is recognised by the revised EYFS, which identifies physical development as one of the three prime areas of learning. • It suggests that children should not only be active but also interactive, and that opportunities should be provided for them to develop skills of coordination, control and movement. • The EYFS also highlights the importance of children understanding the importance of exercise and making healthy choices. • Practitioners working with the youngest children are required to focus on the three prime areas. Emphasis is placed on playing and exploring and active learning. Current frameworks – Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B2
  103. 103. • According to the National Curriculum: ‘every state-funded school must offer a curriculum which is balanced and broadly based and which promotes the spiritual, moral, cultural, mental and physical development of pupils at the school and of society.’ • Physical education is one of the nine foundation subjects in the National Curriculum. Its aims include: • to develop competence in a broad range of physical activities • to be physically active for sustained periods of time • to engage in competitive sports and activities • to lead healthy, active lives. Current frameworks – The National Curriculum in England © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B2
  104. 104. Personal, social and emotional development is one of the three prime areas of learning and development identified in the EYFS. The EYFS contains four overarching principles, two of which are particularly relevant to PSE development, stating that: • ‘every child is a unique child, who is constantly learning and can be resilient, capable, confident and self-assured; • children learn to be strong and independent through positive relationships’. It also states that: ‘Personal, social and emotional development involves helping children to develop a positive sense of themselves, and others; to form positive relationships and develop respect for others; to develop social skills and learn how to manage their feelings; to understand appropriate behaviour in groups; and to have confidence in their own abilities.’ Current frameworks – Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS) © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B2
  105. 105. The National Curriculum for Key Stages 1 and 2 (the primary curriculum) states that one of its aims is to provide ‘pupils with an introduction to the essential knowledge that they need to be educated citizens’. It further states: ‘All schools should make provision for personal, social, health and economic education (PSHE), drawing on good practice’. Current frameworks – The National Curriculum in England © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B2
  106. 106. Independent research activity Time: 15 mins Research both the EYFS and the National Curriculum. • Identify areas in both frameworks where speech, language and communication is referred to. • Consider the aims and principles of the frameworks. • Make careful notes and write down your sources. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/national-curriculum-in- england-framework-for-key-stages-1-to-4 http://www.foundationyears.org.uk/eyfs-statutory-framework/ © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B2
  107. 107. Reflection activity Time: 15 mins Choose either the EYFS or Key stage one • Make notes of any activities that demonstrate the framework in use – for example, outdoor play to support physical development. • Consider how the theoretical perspectives have had an impact on it. • Critically consider whether the framework could/should have had greater regard for the theories. • Use your given philosophy card to make links to the curriculum © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B2
  108. 108. Piaget • Understanding Piaget’s four stages can help to inform planning. • If a practitioner understands egocentrism it will help to inform them when dealing with such situations as a child who takes someone else’s toys. • The practitioner can plan activities to develop concepts such as conservation. Vygotsky • Vygotsky’s focus on the role of the MKO (more knowledgeable other) has implications for the practitioner, considering how and when to intervene to support children in learning new skills and concepts. How theoretical perspectives impact on current practice © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B2
  109. 109. Rudolf Steiner • Steiner identified three essential developmental ages of childhood, the first being 0–7 years, which he considered an important stage. • He believed that children learn through imitation and doing. • Steiner believed that the environment was central to a child’s learning and development. Susan Isaacs • Isaacs stressed the importance of children’s play in their development and learning. • She discouraged desk-based learning and advocated that children should have space and freedom to play. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B2 Theoretical perspectives in relation to physical development
  110. 110. Rudolf Steiner • Steiner identified three stages of development: 1. 0–7 years 2. 7–14 years 3. 14–21 years. • Within these stages he identified phases: the development of the will during 0–7 years, the development of feeling during 7–14 years and the development of thinking from 14 onwards. • He was concerned with the holistic development of the child and felt that the environment was vitally important to a child’s learning. • Steiner believed that self-esteem and emotional well-being are essential to the child’s development. His approach emphasises the relationship between cognitive maturity and socio-emotional and moral development. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B2 Theoretical perspectives in relation to social and emotional development
  111. 111. Maria Montessori • Montessori believed that children learn best through using their hands. • She felt that one of the main factors that contributed to the child’s development was the ‘prepared’ environment. • Children learn through exploration and the adult’s role is to create an environment where they can do this. Friedrich Froebel Although one of the early theorists (1782–1852), Froebel’s theories are still relevant today. He stressed the importance of play and recognised that the outdoor environment is vital to children’s learning and development. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B2 Theoretical perspectives in relation to physical development
  112. 112. Chris Athey Chris Athey developed Piagets idea of schemas when working on the Frobel Nursery research project, working in close partnership with parents. Schema theory delivered from Athey’s work has a strong place in early years practice in the UK. LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B2
  113. 113. Group activity Time: 15 mins Consider the importance of play in relation to physical development. • List any play activities that you have observed when working with children. • How important is the outdoor environment to supporting physical development? • Consider the theories of Gessell, Froebel, Montessori, Steiner and Isaacs – what evidence is there of the influence of these theories in your setting? © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B2
  114. 114. Extension activity Time: 15 mins You have been asked to write a policy for the development of personal, social and emotional skills in children aged 3–5 years. Consider: • What skills you would expect them to have developed • How you can support them in developing further • Provision of appropriate activities and resources • Links to the EYFS • Theorists that you might refer to and why. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO3 Understand theory and educational frameworks which inform knowledge and understanding of early years practice B2
  115. 115. To achieve B2 you are required to further explain how one of the previously written about theories links to the Early Years Foundation Stage and also add a new piece about one philosophical perspective and how this links to the EYFS too. Assignment Task B2
  116. 116. 1. List three activities that you have observed that promote: • Personal, social and emotional development • Language development • Physical development. 2. Explain how these activities relate to the frameworks studied. 3. Is your setting influenced by any of the theorists we have studied – for example, in layout or planning? © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  117. 117. Unit 1 Child development from conception to seven Years
  118. 118. Starter activity LO4 Understand the role of the practitioner when promoting child development from birth to seven years C2 Time: 10 mins The cards for this activity describe the various roles and responsibilities of the practitioner . • Decide which ones you think are more important and rank them in order of importance. • On the five blank cards, write other areas of the practitioner’s role that you can think of. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  119. 119. LO4 Understand the role of the practitioner when promoting child development from birth to seven years. • Discuss the role of the early years practitioner when promoting child development in relation to: C2 • Cognitive development • Speech, language and communication development • Physical development • Social and emotional development. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  120. 120. • The practitioner plays a vital role in the development of cognition in the child. • It is their responsibility to meet children’s individual needs, to educate and facilitate their learning, to provide opportunities for improving skills and expanding knowledge. • Initially the practitioner needs to observe children, to gain information about what they can and cannot do. This will then inform their planning. • They should then support the children by scaffolding and questioning to extend their thinking. The role of the practitioner – cognitive development © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the role of the practitioner when promoting child development from birth to seven years C2
  121. 121. • The practitioner should provide open-ended and practical tasks to encourage children to develop their imaginations. • The practitioner should follow this up by posing questions to challenge the children and encourage them to reflect on their experiences. • The practitioner needs to be aware of children’s development in other areas – for example, social/emotional and language development. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the role of the practitioner when promoting child development from birth to seven years C2 The role of the practitioner – cognitive development
  122. 122. Pairs activity Time: 15 mins With your partner, consider open-ended questions and activities. • Use your given area of the EYFS to plan an activity • List open-ended questions that a practitioner could ask the child while they are involved in the activity. • List closed questions for the same activity. • Discuss the importance of questioning in scaffolding. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the role of the practitioner when promoting child development from birth to seven years C2
  123. 123. • Speech Initially, this will be the gurgling and cooing that a baby produces. The next stage would be babbling, when a baby is experimenting with sounds and produces blends such as ‘ma’ and ‘da’. Ultimately, the child will be able to speak fluently with expression and without hesitating. • Language Language includes expressive language and understanding. Expressive language is when the child is able to link words together to build up sentences which follow the rules of grammar. Understanding is processing and making sense of what people say. • Communication This includes non-verbal communication. Children are able to take account of other people’s views and opinions. They can use language to question, clarify, describe and debate. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_JmA2ClUvUY The role of the practitioner – speech, language and communication development © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the role of the practitioner when promoting child development from birth to seven years C2
  124. 124. Group activity Time: 15 mins Choose either Speech or Language or Communication. Identify all the ways in which a practitioner can support the development of this. • You may wish to refer to the National Curriculum and the EYFS. • Refer to the bullet points on slide 7. • Consider strategies and activities that you can employ. • Prepare a presentation to give to the rest of the class to explain your work. • You should explain how your suggestions will support development in children. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the role of the practitioner when promoting child development from birth to seven years C2
  125. 125. • In order to promote physical development in children, a practitioner needs to be aware of the stages of development. They should carry out observations to ensure that children are meeting the developmental milestones. • It is then important to plan appropriate activities to develop both gross motor skills and fine motor skills. • The practitioner should consider both indoor and outdoor activities. • Any significant delays in reaching the milestones will need to be carefully monitored and, if necessary, advice taken from other professionals – for example, health professionals. • At all times, the practitioner should be aware of relevant frameworks and the importance of physical activity for children in early years. The role of the practitioner – physical development © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the role of the practitioner when promoting child development from birth to seven years C2
  126. 126. Reflection activity Time: 15 mins https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yC2IrZTd4t0&list=PLdeekopL3Rez E7l104PptsGSNUK6kU9uA Reflect on how practitioners in the clip support the physical development of all children. Consider: • The age and stage of the children • Outdoor play • Indoor play • Gross motor skills • Fine motor skills. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the role of the practitioner when promoting child development from birth to seven years C2
  127. 127. • In promoting the social and emotional development of children, the practitioner needs to know and understand the child. The role of the key person will be essential to this. • It is important to liaise with the parents or carers of the child. • It is the practitioner’s responsibility to meet children’s individual needs, to be aware of their stage of development, to plan for equality and diversity and inclusion. • The practitioner needs to be aware of relevant frameworks and setting policies and plan accordingly. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_JmA2ClUvUY The role of the practitioner – social and emotional development © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the role of the practitioner when promoting child development from birth to seven years C2
  128. 128. The practitioner should: • Listen A good listener will be aware if the child is unwell or upset. They will know of children’s interests and can plan accordingly. • Observe Observations will inform the practitioner of children’s limitations, they will be able to plan for and avoid children’s frustrations. • Model A practitioner should model effective social and emotional skills. • Teach A practitioner should teach skills for managing emotions. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the role of the practitioner when promoting child development from birth to seven years C2 The role of the practitioner – social and emotional development
  129. 129. Pairs activity Time: 15 mins Discuss the bullet points on the previous slide. • Consider all the benefits to the practitioner of each bullet point: listen, observe, model and teach. • Consider all the benefits to the child of each. • Identify an example from your own practice of when you have listened, observed, modelled or taught a skill which supports the social or emotional development of children. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the role of the practitioner when promoting child development from birth to seven years C2
  130. 130. Extension activity Time: 15 mins Plan a series of activities around a theme – for example, homes. • Briefly outline an activity that you could plan to promote each of the areas of development. • Identify the age that your activities are aimed at. • Explain how your activities would support the child in their development. This should cover all areas of learning. • Highlight how the physical activities benefit the holistic learning of the child. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO4 Understand the role of the practitioner when promoting child development from birth to seven years C2
  131. 131. 1. Write a list of bullet points that describe the role of the practitioner. 2. What qualities does a practitioner need in order to support the development of: • Speech, language and communication • Social and emotional development. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  132. 132. Group activity To achieve C2 you are required to produce a ‘good practice guide’ to discuss the role of the early year’s practitioner when promoting child development in relation to; (pick 2 of the following to add to your guide) Cognitive development Speech, language and communication development Physical development Social and emotional development Assignment Task C2
  133. 133. Unit 1 Child development from conception to seven Years
  134. 134. LO5 Understand how to plan opportunities for children’s learning and development from birth to five years • Plan opportunities for children from birth to five years in relation to: D5 • cognitive development • speech, language and communication development • physical development • social and emotional development. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  135. 135. Starter activity LO5 Understand how to plan opportunities for children’s learning and development from birth to five years D5 Time: 10 mins • List as many activities as you can in 3 minutes. • Compare your list with a partner. • Sort your list according to which areas of development each activity supports and develops. • Activities can support more than one area of development. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited
  136. 136. • The development of language, thinking and learning are all very closely linked. Sustained shared thinking (SST) explains how practitioners should develop children’s critical thinking skills and cognitive development. • The practitioner should be aware of children’s interests and their level of understanding. From here they can challenge children’s thinking and encourage them to develop their ideas. This will often take place through conversations during practical activities. • SST was identified in the EYFS and it is part of the practitioner’s role to nurture children’s thought processes. They need to encourage children to be curious, to reason, predict, evaluate and suggest solutions to problems. Cognitive development © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO5 Understand how to plan opportunities for children’s learning and development from birth to five years D5
  137. 137. Group activity Time: 15 mins Discuss activities that you could plan for a group of children aged 3–5 years. Consider: • Problem-solving • Abstract thinking. Discuss how the activities can support cognitive development. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO5 Understand how to plan opportunities for children’s learning and development from birth to five years D5
  138. 138. Speech • A baby cries when unhappy and gurgles and coos when happy. By the age of 1 year 11 months, babies are able to use up to 50 words, put 2–3 words together to form basic sentences and ask simple questions. • Between the ages of 2–3, children will begin to use descriptive language, their vocabulary increases to 300 words and they can use pronouns. • At 3–5 years, a child will progress from using 4–6-word sentences and muddling irregular words – for example, ‘sheeps’ for ‘sheep’, to using well-formed sentences and being easily understood by adults. Speech, language and communication development © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO5 Understand how to plan opportunities for children’s learning and development from birth to five years D5
  139. 139. Communication • A baby will make eye contact; by 1 year 11 months it will be copying adult body language and pretend play will be developing. • Between the ages of 2–3, children will join in the play of others and can hold a conversation, but will jump from topic to topic. • At the age of 3, a child will play with his peers and understand turn- taking. By the age of 5, he will be choosing his own friends, be generally cooperative and will be able to plan projects – for example, making a model. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO5 Understand how to plan opportunities for children’s learning and development from birth to five years D5 Speech, language and communication development
  140. 140. Pairs activity Time: 15 mins Discuss activities that you could plan for a group of children aged 3–5 years. Consider: • Development of speech and grammar • Developing language – adjectives, use of tenses (for example, a weather board: yesterday the weather was … today it is … tomorrow it will be…) • Games and activities that encourage cooperation • Activities that involve planning and problem-solving. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO5 Understand how to plan opportunities for children’s learning and development from birth to five years D5
  141. 141. • Between 4–12 weeks a baby should be able to lift its head. • Between 3–5 months their muscles will start to develop and they will reach out for objects. • At 5 months a baby can lift objects. • At 6 months a baby will learn hand-to-hand coordination. • At 6–8 months a baby can sit without support. • At 6–9 months a baby will start to crawl and use furniture to help it stand. • At 10–18 months a baby will try to walk on its own. • At 15 months a baby will enjoy playing with bricks. • At 18 months a child can climb onto a toy. Physical development © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO5 Understand how to plan opportunities for children’s learning and development from birth to five years D5
  142. 142. Between the age of 2–3, children will develop better coordination and confidence with speed – for example, they will be able to: • Run in a forward direction • Jump in one place • Kick a ball • Stand on one foot • Turn pages of a book • Draw a circle • Hold a crayon between the thumb and fingers. • Why is it important to plan age appropriate activities for children? © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO5 Understand how to plan opportunities for children’s learning and development from birth to five years D5 Physical development
  143. 143. Between the age of 3–5, children become increasingly confident in their abilities, they can: Gross motor skills • Ride a tricycle • Go down a slide unassisted • Pull, push and steer toys • Walk in a straight line • Hop on one foot • Run round obstacles • Balance on one foot • Skip with alternating feet • Walk backwards • Throw and catch a ball. Fine motor skills • Cut paper with safety scissors • Build a tall towers with toy blocks • Manipulate clay into shapes • Draw crosses, circles and triangles. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO5 Understand how to plan opportunities for children’s learning and development from birth to five years D5 Physical development
  144. 144. Pairs activity Time: 10 mins Write a list of as many games or activities you can think of that would promote physical development for each of the three age groups: • 0–1 year 11 months • 2–2 years 11 months • 3–5 years. Remember to include a range of activities that would support both fine and gross motor skills. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO5 Understand how to plan opportunities for children’s learning and development from birth to five years D5
  145. 145. Social and emotional skills that children will develop include: • Responding to adults • A sense of being an individual • Independence • Changes in managing own behaviour • Cooperation • Awareness of the feelings of others • Friendships • Turn-taking. Social and emotional development © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO5 Understand how to plan opportunities for children’s learning and development from birth to five years D5
  146. 146. Classroom discussion activity Time: 15 mins Discuss activities that you could plan for a group of children aged 3–5 years that will support social and emotional development. Consider: • Children’s increasing independence • The development of children’s social skills at this stage • Individual needs, for example, a shy child • That not all children will develop these skills at the same rate • Games and activities that encourage co-operation, negotiating skills and leadership skills • Games with rules. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO5 Understand how to plan opportunities for children’s learning and development from birth to five years D5
  147. 147. Extension activity Time: 15 mins Explain why each of the following are important when planning an activity or experience: • Individual needs • Age and stage of development • Available resources • How the activity builds on previous learning • How to make the activity fun while providing challenge • Planning for equality and diversity and inclusion. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO5 Understand how to plan opportunities for children’s learning and development from birth to five years D5
  148. 148. Independent research activity Time: 20 mins Research relevant and useful activities. Find examples suitable for each of the identified areas of development: • cognitive development • speech, language and communication development • physical development • social and emotional development. Consider the thinking behind each activity. How might you adapt the activities for your own setting? Create a plan or plans to cover the areas of development identified. © Hodder & Stoughton Limited LO5 Understand how to plan opportunities for children’s learning and development from birth to five years D5
  149. 149. 1. List stories that involve a moral dilemma. 2. Explain opportunities in your setting for children to speak – for example, ‘show and tell’. 3. Describe what is meant by ‘sustained shared thinking’. 4. What area of development does this support? © Hodder & Stoughton Limited

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