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3.7 EYE

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  1. 1. Unit 3.7 Understand the needs or the child preparing for School
  2. 2. Starter Activity Read the article below take notes and discuss your thoughts with the group. http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-26976726
  3. 3. Learning outcomes • Identify the meaning of ‘school readiness’ • Describe characteristics of ‘school readiness’ • Describe ways in which a practitioner can prepare a child to start school
  4. 4. • When children start school they will all have very different abilities, skills and experiences. • Being school ready is not about being able to read and write. LO1. Understand school readiness in relation to the role of the early years practitioner 1.1 School readiness
  5. 5. School readiness Confident Independent Self-help skills Curious Problem solver Sociable Cooperative Keen LO1. Understand school readiness in relation to the role of the early years practitioner . Board blast what skills would children need to have developed by the time they start School?
  6. 6. • Children who have been to a nursery setting will have experiences and skills that will support them to be ready for school. • They will have experienced leaving their parent/carer on a daily basis. • They will have had opportunities to play with other children, sometimes in large groups. LO1. Understand school readiness in relation to the role of the early years practitioner 1.1 School readiness
  7. 7. Before a child starts school there are some key skills they need that will help them to be ready for school. These include: • Being able to be around others • Being used to turn taking and sharing • Being able to carry out basic self care • Being open to learn new things and to work things out for themselves • Knowing that their parent/carer will be back to pick them up. LO1. Understand school readiness in relation to the role of the early years practitioner 1.1 School readiness
  8. 8. Time: 15 mins Discuss opportunities for turn taking and sharing in the nursery setting and think about how these will help a child to be ready for school. Consider: • School class sizes • Working in ability groups • Play time and lunch time in the school. LO1. Understand school readiness in relation to the role of the early years practitioner 1.1
  9. 9. • If children have developed their self-confidence before they start school they will be more able to ask questions and not be afraid to get things wrong. • Independence will support them to be confident in all areas of the school day, from play time to going to the toilet to getting on with tasks in the classroom. • If children are keen and interested to learn then school will be an exciting and interesting experience. LO1. Understand school readiness in relation to the role of the early years practitioner 1.1 School readiness
  10. 10. Time: 15 mins Discuss the importance of being sociable as part of school readiness. Consider: • What does it mean? • The impact on the child. • The benefits of being sociable to help adapt to new situations. LO1. Understand school readiness in relation to the role of the early years practitioner 1.1
  11. 11. Time: 15 mins How would the practitioner prepare the child for the transition to School? Consider: • Making friends • Feeling confident • Wanting to go back every day. LO1. Understand school readiness in relation to the role of the early years practitioner 1.1
  12. 12. Time: 15 mins Describe your own experiences of a setting supporting a child to be ready for school. Consider: • Peer support • Visits to the school or from the class teacher • Activities and stories to help prepare the child • Research the policies and procedures of the setting for supporting a child to be ready for school. LO1. Understand school readiness in relation to the role of the early years practitioner 1.1
  13. 13. Time: 15 mins Which element of school readiness do you think is the most important? Give your reasons why. Consider: • Being able to be around others • Being used to turn taking and sharing • Being able to carry out basic self care • Being open to learning new things and working things out for themselves • Knowing that their parent/carer will be back to pick them up. LO1. Understand school readiness in relation to the role of the early years practitioner 1.1
  14. 14. School readiness What does ‘School readiness mean?’ There are 3 key elements of the term ‘School readiness:- Children's readiness for school - What children should know and be able to do in order to enter school ready and eager to learn, thereby enabling a successful transition to a primary school environment. Schools' readiness for children - School environments and practices that foster and support a smooth transition for children into primary school and later years. These practices also promote the learning of all children. Ready Families - Family and community supports and services that contribute to children's readiness for school success Parental and caregiver attitudes towards and involvement in their children’s early learning and development and transition to school.
  15. 15. Task Matching pairs activity Communication Skills Children who rely heavily on adults to carry out basic activities may find starting School more challenging. Seemingly simple things such as putting on and doing up their own coat or remembering to go to the toilet without being reminded are important, as well as being able to get themselves changed for PE, or use a knife and fork. Children will increasingly need to be able to think for themselves and act independently – for example, remembering to put their lunch box or book bag in a particular place in the morning. Self – confidence This refers to children who are able to manage their feelings and talk about what is happening. Children who understand the need for appropriate behaviour and follow the rules will find it easier to settle into school routines. Independence Children who are more confident in themselves may be more willing to try new activities or to tell adults when they need help. This will affect their experiences and how they work with others. Co-operation Children who have limited pre-school experiences may find it difficult to adapt to their new routines. Starting school may be daunting and they may be reluctant to leave parents and carers.
  16. 16. Summary  All children can be helped to be ready for school.  Children do not need to be able to read and write before they start school.  Rich, varied life experiences will support a child to be ready for school.
  17. 17. Summary: plenary activities 1. Name three skills that will help a child’s school readiness.
  18. 18. Unit 3.7 Understand the needs or the child preparing for School
  19. 19. Starter activity Watch the clip list the benefits of working with others when supporting children into School http://www.educationscotland.gov.uk/video/p/video_tcm46510 67.asp
  20. 20. Learning outcomes Describe factors affecting children’s readiness for school • Explain how the early years practitioner supports children to prepare for school
  21. 21. There are many factors that may affect whether or not a child is ready for school but they can be summarised as: • The individual child’s readiness for school • The school’s readiness for the individual child • Parent/carer’s support of the individual child’s readiness for school. Factors affecting school readiness LO1. Understand school readiness in relation to the role of the early years practitioner 1.2, 1.3
  22. 22. The individual child’s readiness for school can include whether the child has had the opportunities to develop the necessary skills. These can include: • Opportunities to play, share and be with other children their own age. If children have not had these experiences then going to school can be a daunting and confusing experience. • A level of self-confidence and independence. If children are totally reliant on others then they may find themselves struggling to cope with day-to-day expectations. Factors affecting school readiness LO1. Understand school readiness in relation to the role of the early years practitioner 1.2, 1.3
  23. 23. The school needs to be ready for the individual child. Before a child starts at school and in the early stages of a new term, schools need to consider: • Effective information sharing with previous settings and parents/carers • An open, welcoming environment where every child is valued and respected • The role of the key person in supporting a smooth transition • Adapting activities and opportunities to meet the individual needs of the child. Factors affecting school readiness LO1. Understand school readiness in relation to the role of the early years practitioner 1.2, 1.3
  24. 24. Parents and carers play a vital role in preparing a child to be ready for school. They need to consider: • Providing the individual child with a range of experiences that enable them to develop the necessary skills for school readiness • Having conversations about going to school in a positive and supportive manner • Information sharing with the school about any particular needs the child may have including health, dietary or special needs. Factors affecting school readiness LO1. Understand school readiness in relation to the role of the early years practitioner 1.2, 1.3
  25. 25. Time: 15 mins Discuss the impact of the following factors affecting a child’s school readiness: • A shy or withdrawn child • A child who has moved to a new area and starts school the following day • A child whose parent or carer had a poor school experience and doesn’t see the point in children going to school. LO1. Understand school readiness in relation to the role of the early years practitioner [AC 1.2, 1.3]
  26. 26. • The early years practitioner has an important role in preparing children to be ready for school. • The early years practitioner will have enabled children to get used to routines. • They will have supported children’s self-reliance and self-help skills. • Early years practitioners will have provided the children with a wide range of activities, experiences and opportunities to develop the skills necessary to be ready for school. • They will have also supported the children to be ready for the change in environment and staff. The role of the early years practitioner LO1. Understand school readiness in relation to the role of the early years practitioner 1.2, 1.3
  27. 27. Time: 15 mins How does your setting help children to be ready for school? Consider: • Day-to-day routines • Working with a group of children who are all moving together • Changing expectations of the older children • Visits to or from the school. LO1. Understand school readiness in relation to the role of the early years practitioner 1.2, 1.3
  28. 28. • The early years practitioner will have observed and documented the individual child’s progress and development. • This information will be vital for the new staff as this will help settle the child and move them on to their next stage of development and learning. The role of the early years practitioner LO1. Understand school readiness in relation to the role of the early years practitioner 1.2, 1.3
  29. 29. How can the practitioner support the child in preparing for school ? Supporting children’s preparation for School What stories might you read? What would you talk to teachers about? What would you talk to parents about? What information could you give out?
  30. 30. Time: 15 mins How does your setting help children to be ready for school? Consider: • Day-to-day routines • Working with a group of children who are all moving together • Changing expectations of the older children • Visits to or from school. LO1. Understand school readiness in relation to the role of the early years practitioner 1.2, 1.3
  31. 31. Time: 15 mins Prepare an information leaflet to give to staff about how they can prepare their key children to prepare for School Consider: • How to make it an exciting opportunity for the children • Answering the children’s questions truthfully • Talking to the children when they return from the visit. LO1. Understand school readiness in relation to the role of the early years practitioner 1.2, 1.3
  32. 32. Summary  Children need to be ready for school for them to have a smooth transition.  The school has to get ready for the child by gathering all the necessary information and fully preparing for the child’s individual needs and interests.  Parents and carers play a vital role in preparing children for school readiness.
  33. 33. Summary: plenary activities 1. Describe three factors that may affect a child’s school readiness. 2. Describe three things a practitioner can do to enable a child to be school ready.
  34. 34. Unit 3.7WB Understand the needs or the child preparing for School
  35. 35. Learning outcomes • Describe areas of learning and development within the current framework which relates to School readiness • Identify assessment strategies in relation to the current framework • Evaluate the current framework’s assessment process in supporting children’s preparation for school
  36. 36. LO2. Understand school readiness in relation to the current framework 2.2, 2.3 Time: 15 mins How do you prefer to be assessed? Consider: • Written work • Exams • Discussions. Which method do you like the least? Why?
  37. 37. LO2. Understand school readiness in relation to the current framework 2.1 Look at you copy of the EYFS Note down the areas in which relate to ‘school readiness’ Describe what is covered within these areas of Learning and Development
  38. 38. • The assessment of a child’s learning and development is a continual process. • There are formal and informal strategies for assessing children. • The EYFS has specific assessment requirements that are to be carried out at set times. • Practitioners will use a range of methods to assess a child’s learning and development. Assessment strategies LO2. Understand school readiness in relation to the current framework 2.2, 2.3
  39. 39. • Practitioners will use information gathered from observing children to assess their learning and development. • They will carry out planned observations to assess specific areas of learning and development but they will also carry out regular brief observations of all children as they play and learn. Assessment strategies LO2. Understand school readiness in relation to the current framework 2.2, 2.3
  40. 40. Time: 15 mins Describe how practitioners carry out observations in your setting. Consider: • Planned observations • Spontaneous observations • What happens to the observation once it has been written? LO2. Understand school readiness in relation to the current framework [AC 2.2, 2.3]
  41. 41. • Practitioners can assess children through day-to-day conversations by using open-ended questions to check learning and understanding. • Reviews of the child’s progress with their parents/carers will enable practitioners to get a holistic view of the child’s learning and development. • Photographs and videos of the children at play will give practitioners and parents/carers the opportunity to see a snapshot of a child’s learning and development as it happens. Assessment strategies LO2. Understand school readiness in relation to the current framework 2.2, 2.3
  42. 42. Assessment methods Planned observations Photos Examples of work Meetings with parents/ carers Video Spontaneous observations Talking to the child LO2. Understand school readiness in relation to the current framework 2.2, 2.3
  43. 43. • Assessing children as an ongoing process is known as formative assessment. • Summative assessments summarise the child’s learning and development at a given time. • The EYFS requires that practitioners carry out both formative and summative assessments. Assessment strategies: formative and summative LO2. Understand school readiness in relation to the current framework 2.2, 2.3
  44. 44. The EYFS includes two main summative assessments: • Progress check: carried out when a child reaches two. This is a written summary of the child’s learning and development. • EYFS profile: completed when children are at the end of the EYFS in the Reception class. Practitioners, parents and where relevant other professionals will contribute to these summative assessments. Summative assessments LO2. Understand school readiness in relation to the current framework 2.2, 2.3
  45. 45. Time: 15 mins Discuss the benefits of formative and summative assessments. Consider: • Why do we need both types of assessment? • What are the benefits of each type? • What are the drawbacks? LO2. Understand school readiness in relation to the current framework 2.2, 2.3
  46. 46. • The EYFS assessment process will enable practitioners to determine whether children have developed the skills to be ready for school. • If there are any concerns about the child’s progress then the EYFS profile will provide the Year 1 teacher with vital information and this will help them to support the child in school. Assessment process LO2. Understand school readiness in relation to the current framework 2.2, 2.3
  47. 47. Time: 15 mins How effective is the EYFS profile in supporting Year 1 staff in planning? Consider: • How many profiles they may have to be read • The quality of each profile • The effects of a summer break between the end of Reception and beginning of Year 1. LO2. Understand school readiness in relation to the current framework 2.2, 2.3
  48. 48. Time: 15 mins How do you think children should be assessed at the end of the EYFS? Consider: • How the assessment will be carried out • How the assessment will look • How the information will be interpreted. LO2. Understand school readiness in relation to the current framework 2.2, 2.3
  49. 49. Summary  There are many different assessment strategies.  Formative assessment supports summative assessment.  Practitioners and parents/carers contribute to the assessment process.  Assessing children will provide practitioners with vital information that will support their learning and development.
  50. 50. Summary: plenary activities 1. What is the difference between formative and summative assessment? 2. Name the two summative assessments with the EYFS. 3. List four assessment methods.
  51. 51. Unit 3.7 Understand the needs or the child preparing for School
  52. 52. Starter activity How many words can you make out of: Language Rich Environment
  53. 53. Learning outcomes • Identify others involved in helping children prepare for school • Describe the information required to enable the School to meet the individual needs of the child during transition • Explain the role of the early years practitioner in encouraging parents/ carers to take an active role in their child’s play, learning and development in preparation for School readiness
  54. 54. • Everyone has a role to play in preparing children for school. • Parents/carers know their child best and are able support them with skills they will need at school. • Practitioners will have the opportunity to prepare children for their next stage of learning and development. • Other professionals may be involved and will support the specific needs of a child to be ready for school. Helping children prepare for school LO3. Understand how working in partnership with others contributes to children’s School readiness
  55. 55. • When a child starts school the school will require a range of information about the child to help them meet their individual needs. • Some of the information will be about personal details and some will be about the child’s learning and development so far. • The child’s previous setting will provide the school with an EYFS profile and this will be a summative assessment of the child’s abilities. Information sharing LO3. Understand how working in partnership with others contributes to children’s School readiness 3.1
  56. 56. Information on the child Full name Preferred name Date of birth Position in family Dietary requirements Individual needs Health information Summative assessment LO3. Understand how working in partnership with others contributes to children’s School readiness What are the roles of others when gathering this information?
  57. 57. Time: 15 mins Describe how knowing personal information about a child will help the school to support the individual needs of the child. Consider: • Correct spelling of their name • Preferred name to be used • Health issues • Dietary requirements • Likes and dislikes • Previous experiences i.e. have they been to a nursery or childminder? Who would you get this information from? LO3. Understand how working in partnership with others contributes to children’s School readiness 3.2
  58. 58. The child’s EYFS profile will provide Year 1 staff with information about the child’s learning and development in the seven areas of learning. The profile will describe whether a child has met each of the Early learning goals (ELGs). These will be described as: • Emerging – this means the child has not yet met the ELG • Expected – this means the child has met the ELG • Exceeding – this means the child has exceeded the expectations of the ELG. Information sharing LO3. Understand how working in partnership with others contributes to children’s School readiness 3.2
  59. 59. Time: 15 mins Early learning goals (ELGs) How does the explanation of ‘emerging’, ‘expected’ or ‘exceeding’ achievements support the school in meeting the individual needs of the child? Consider: • The child who has not yet met certain ELGs • The child who has met every ELG • The child who has exceeded in one or more of the ELGs. LO3. Understand how working in partnership with others contributes to children’s School readiness 3.2
  60. 60. • The child’s parents/carers play a key role in children’s school readiness. • This will range from preparing their child for school by answering questions and talking to them about school to actually helping them get ready for school on a day-to-day basis. • Practitioners need to share experiences with parents/carers that are supporting children’s school readiness. • This could include encouraging and praising independence and visits to or from the school. Work with parents/carers LO3. Understand how working in partnership with others contributes to children’s School readiness 3.2
  61. 61. Time: 15 mins Discuss the benefits of encouraging parents/carers to take an active role in preparing their child for school readiness. Consider: • Benefits to the child • Benefits to the setting • Benefits to the parents/carers. LO3. Understand how working in partnership with others contributes to children’s School readiness
  62. 62. Time: 15 mins How well does your setting work with others to support children’s school readiness? Consider: • Teamwork within the setting • Liaison with the school • Partnership with parents/carers. LO3. Understand how working in partnership with others contributes to children’s School readiness
  63. 63. Make a poster to inform Parents / Carers on how they can take an active role at home in helping to prepare their child for School www.gov.uk/government/publications https://www.pacey.org.uk/working-in-childcare/spotlight-on/be ing-school-ready/ LO3. Understand how working in partnership with others contributes to children’s School readiness Parents’ Guide to the Early Years Foundation Stage Framework Exciting times ahead for you and your child
  64. 64. Time: 15 mins You have been asked to arrange an event to encourage parents/carers to support their child’s school readiness. What would you do? Consider: • Timing • Location • Activities • Who will attend • Proposed outcomes. LO3. Understand how working in partnership with others contributes to children’s School readiness
  65. 65. Summary  Partnership with parents/carers will support a child’s school readiness.  Accurate information about the child will enable the school to meet the individual needs of the child.
  66. 66. Summary: plenary activities 1. List three things the school would need to know about the child before they start school. 2. What are the three words, that all start with the letter ‘E’ that describe how well a child has met an early learning goal (ELG)?
  67. 67. Homework 1. Prepare for externally set assignment to hand in September 2016 2. Extended Essay 2 3. The Extended Essay (EE 2) title is: 4. The Early Years Educator follows the current early years framework in the development of children’s school readiness 5. The Extended Essay will be graded D to A*. 6. To achieve the Extended Essay learners must achieve the minimum of a D grade. 7. The Extended Essay must be undertaken by following these criteria: 8. D grade 9. D1 Describe how practitioners support children’s readiness for school. 10. D2 Explain why it is important for practitioners to give effective support to children to prepare for school. 11. D3 Show evidence of reading and use of sources. 12. Assignment Due date for 3.7, 5/9/16 13. Please have your externally set assignment first draft printed out for when Sharon Observes you in September

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