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Architecting your own DBaaS in a Private Cloud with EM12c (WP)

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Oracle in the 2014 edition of its Open World rolled out new database public cloud service with its DBaaS offerings, but this is just a piece in each company's technological architecture. Businesses still have the need to create a Private cloud and discover the driver to create it; Wether it is a measured service,consolidation or rapid provisioning, finding this driver will be the initial building block for it. This presentation will give you an insight on how a Private Cloud is architected, how the service catalog is the most important brick and how get the benefit of this upcoming era of Databases.

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Architecting your own DBaaS in a Private Cloud with EM12c (WP)

  1. 1. COLLABORATE 15 – IOUG Forum Cloud Computing 1 | P a g e “Architecting your own DBaaS in a Private Cloud with EM12c” White Paper Architecting your own DBaaS in a Private Cloud with EM12c René Antúnez, The Pythian Group ABSTRACT TARGET AUDIENCE This document will benefit whoever is starting to architect their environment using private clouds, it covers the basic concepts and management tips to be able to start with private DBaaS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY DATABASE-AS-A-SERVICE (DBAAS) When defining what is a Database as a Service we need to know that it is not a technology per se, but its an architectural and operational paradigm. It is a self-service computing environment offering the ability to create, consume and pay for database services. In this architecture, computing resources are elastically supplied from a shared pool and charged based on metered use and it uses service catalogs to provide a menu of options and service levels. The principles of a DBaaS architecture supports the following necessary capabilities: •   Resource pooling. - Services can be adjusted to suit each client's needs without any changes being apparent to the client or end user. •   Rapid elasticity. - The provider’s computing resources are pooled to serve multiple consumers using a multi-tenant model, with different physical and virtual resources dynamically assigned and reassigned according to consumer demand. •   On-demand self-service. - Provision computing capabilities, such as server time and network storage, as needed automatically without requiring human interaction with each service provider •   Measured service. - Resource usage can be monitored, controlled, and reported, providing transparency for both the provider and consumer •   Broad network access. - Capabilities are available over the network and accessed through standard mechanisms that promote use by heterogeneous thin or thick client platforms Oracle in the 2014 edition of its Open World rolled out new database public cloud service with its DBaaS offerings, but this is just a piece in each company's technological architecture. Businesses still have the need to create a Private cloud and discover the driver to create it; whether it is a measured service, consolidation or rapid provisioning, finding this driver will be the initial building block for it. This presentation will give you an insight on how a Private Cloud is architected, how the service catalog is the most important brick and how get the benefit of this upcoming era of Databases. Reader will be able to: • Create a business service catalog and relate it to a technological service catalog. • How to create a self-service model for providing resources to their users, including schema and database provisioning. • Have a reference architecture for a Private Cloud.
  2. 2. COLLABORATE 15 – IOUG Forum Cloud Computing 2 | P a g e “Architecting your own DBaaS in a Private Cloud with EM12c” White Paper BUSINESS DRIVERS We need to understand that DBaaS is an architecture that will not be a true fit for everybody, so when defining what our private cloud architecture will be, we need to define what are the business drivers for us to implement DBaaS a)   Increment our agility within our enterprise by providing: •   The ability to remove certain human procedures and have the end user be a Self-Service consumer •   A well defined service catalog •   Capability to adapt to workload changes by provisioning or deprovisioning system resources b)   Reduce enterprise costs by •   Using shared system resources for our different applications and internal business divisions •   Being capable of determining the actual usage of system resources to show the benefit of our architecture •   Capable of automating mundane and routine tasks c)   Reduce enterprise risks •   By having greater control of the resources we have and how they are being used •   Have a more unified security across our business •   Providing different levels of high availability to our enterprise SERVICE CATALOG The most critical part when defining any type of service, is defining what is it that we are going to provide, take McDonalds for example, when we get to a counter there is a well defined catalog of what products we can consume in that establishment, it will be a certain type of hamburgers and junk food. To define it more clearly, we can’t go into McDonalds and order a pizza or Italian food, as that is not in their business or service catalog. When defining our business enterprise service catalog, we need to define the What, as to what type of service we want to provide, what service levels we want to provide, what policies are we going to apply to the service and what are our capabilities to provide it. The business service catalog will translate into a technical enterprise catalog, defining every detail of how are we going to provide our business services, in here we need to define the How, how are we going to deploy the service, how are we going to provide the service levels, how are we going to apply the business policies and how are we going to manage our services.
  3. 3. COLLABORATE 15 – IOUG Forum Cloud Computing 3 | P a g e “Architecting your own DBaaS in a Private Cloud with EM12c” White Paper ZONES AND RESOURCE POOLS To be able to provide our services, one of the first things we need to define are our zones and pools within our private cloud. A zone refers to a logical grouping of cloud infrastructure resources based on functional, departmental or geographic boundaries. A resource pool is a logical unit of homogeneous clustered or non-clustered resources exhibiting common characteristics. In enterprise manager we will define the Zones and Resource Pools in the following locations •   setup—>cloud—>PaaS Infrastructure Zones •   setup—>cloud—>Database—>Database Pools SELF-SERVICE PROVISIONING Enterprise Manager 12c comes with an easy-to-use, out-of-box console for self-service provisioning. It supports provisioning into all the resource pools we have described before. It supports automated placement, quotas, retirement policies and can handle the use cases for new database provisioning and cloning every operation supported in the self-service console is also available by RESTFUL APIs so that enterprises can integrate it with their custom home-grown portal or 3rd party orchestration tools. In enterprise manager if we are not using the RESTFUL API’s, we can find the Self Service provisioning in
  4. 4. COLLABORATE 15 – IOUG Forum Cloud Computing 4 | P a g e “Architecting your own DBaaS in a Private Cloud with EM12c” White Paper •   Enterprise—>Cloud—>Middleware and Database Home •   Enterprise—>Cloud—>Middleware and Database Home Request Dashboard •   Enterprise—>Provisioning and Patching—>Procedure Activity METER, CHARGE AND OPTIMIZE Business consumers want to know what they are consuming and what it costs, even if they don’t actually want to pay for the service. Additionally, from an operational perspective, as different tenants start sharing the same piece of platform or infrastructure, there needs to be accountability on the usage, or else resources may be over-allocated. To mitigate this, we often meter the usage and optionally chargeback [or show back] the tenants. Though an IT organization may not actually charge back its LOBs, this provides a transparent mechanism to budget resources and optimize the cloud platform on an ongoing basis. REFERENCES a)   An Architect’s Guide to the Oracle Private Database Cloud http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/topics/entarch/oes-refarch-dbaas-508111.pdf b)   The NIST Definition of Cloud Computing http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistpubs/800-145/SP800-145.pdf c)   Service Catalogs: Defining Standardized Database Services http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/database/database-cloud/private/service-catalogs-for-dbaas-2041214.pdf d)   Delivering Database as a Service (DBaaS) using Oracle Enterprise Manager 12c http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/oem/cloud-mgmt/dbaas-overview-wp-1915651.pdf

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