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Training to assist migrant farmworkers and other agricultural workers recognize, prevent, stop and avoid workplace sexual violence. This material was produced under grant SH-27615-5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

Training to assist migrant farmworkers and other agricultural workers recognize, prevent, stop and avoid workplace sexual violence. This material was produced under grant SH-27615-5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

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Nos cuidamos We care chs_7.5 hr training presentation

  1. 1. Nos Cuidamos – We Care Prevention of Workplace Sexual Violence Intermediate Level English as a Second Language CENTER FOR HUMAN SERVICES 5404 Wisconsin Ave., Suite 800 Chevy Chase, MD. 20815 www.chs-urc.org ______________________________________________________________________ This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  2. 2. OSHA Disclaimer • This material was produced under grant SH- 27615-5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  3. 3. Lesson 1: Workplace Violence By the end of this lesson, I will: Understand more about the prevalence of workplace crime Understand the types of workplace crime Be able to participate in a discussion about workplace violence This material was produced under grant SH- 27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does
  4. 4. Homicides at Work • In the United States, there are an average 700 homicides at work each year. This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  5. 5. Washington Texas Oklahoma Kansas Nebraska South Dakota North Dakota Minnesota Iowa Missouri Arkansas Louisiana Wisconsin Illinois Michigan Ohio Alaska Hawaii Nonfatal Violent Crime at Work In 2009, 572,000 people were victims of nonfatal violent crimes at work.
  6. 6. Rape at the Workplace • 36,500 rapes and sexual assaults occur each year at the workplace This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  7. 7. This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  8. 8. Sexual Assault and Farm Work • 90 percent of female farmworkers say that sexual violence at work is a major problem. This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  9. 9. Four Types of Workplace Violence • Worker-on-Worker • Personal Relationship This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  10. 10. Four Types of Workplace Violence • Criminal Intent • Customer or Client This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  11. 11. Key Terms Key term Example workplace “Is your workplace safe?” violence “Is violence a problem in your neighborhood?” crime “Does your city have a lot of crime?” fatal “Drinking poison can be fatal.” nonfatal “There are many nonfatal accidents and injuries in farm work and construction.” customer “Customers sometimes get angry and violent.” criminal “The criminal had a gun.” personal relationship “Can personal relationship problems affect the workplace?” homicide “There are many homicides at work.” rape “One out of six women in American are victims of attempted or completed rape.”* sexual assault “Men can be victims of sexual assault.” This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  12. 12. Discussion • A man at work is often angry. He likes to yell and fight with other workers. In your opinion, what can coworkers do to avoid fighting with him? What can employers do? • A woman at work has problems with her husband. He often gets violent at home. He sometimes follows her to work and causes problems. In your opinion, what can coworkers do? What can employers do? This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  13. 13. This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  14. 14. Lesson 2: Your Rights By the end of this lesson, I will: Understand more about my rights Be able to call the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and report a dangerous situation This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  15. 15. This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  16. 16. You have the right • To complain about a dangerous or unhealthful condition to your employer This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  17. 17. What if? What can you do if your employer doesn’t care about a hazard or dangerous situation? This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  18. 18. You have the right • To file a complaint with OSHA without fear of retaliation • To confidentially ask OSHA to inspect your workplace This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  19. 19. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) In 1970, the U.S. Congress passed a law to prevent workers from being killed or harmed at work. The new law created OSHA. OSHA sets and enforces standards, provides training, outreach, education and assistance. This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  20. 20. Employers • Safety Training • Must provide safety training in a language and vocabulary workers can understand This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  21. 21. You have the right • To speak in private with an OSHA inspector • To participate in an OSHA inspection This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  22. 22. Employers • Whistleblower protections It is against the law for employers to retaliate against an employee who reports injuries or safety concerns. This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  23. 23. Employers cannot Retaliate Common types of retaliation • Firing or laying off • Blacklisting • Demoting • Denying overtime or promotion • Disciplining • Denying benefits • Failure to hire or rehire • Intimidation • Making threats • Reassignment affecting prospects for promotion • Reducing pay or hours • Despido o cese en el empleo • Inclusión en una lista negra • Degradación • Denegación del pago de sobretiempo o de ascenso de categoría laboral • Medidas disciplinarias • Denegación de beneficios • Denegación de contratación o recontratación • Intimidación • Amenazas • Reasignación que afecta las perspectivas de ascenso de categoría laboral • Reducción en salario o horas This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  24. 24. Key terms Term Example complain “Workers have the right to complain about hazards to their employers.” dangerous “Farm work is dangerous. It can be very hot. Sun stroke is dangerous.” retaliate “Employers cannot retaliate against workers who complain.” inspect “OSHA inspects workplaces.” participate “Workers have the right to participate in a safety inspection.” private “Workers can meet in private with an OSHA inspector.” hazards “Employers must keep the workplace free from hazards.” report “Employees have the right to report dangerous situations at work.” safety concerns “Workers have a right to report safety concerns." This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  25. 25. This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  26. 26. Lesson 3: Workplace Sexual Harassment • By the end of this lesson, I will: – Be able to recognize sexual harassment – Be able to recognize forms of sexual harassment – Be able to participate in a discussion about sexual harassment This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  27. 27. What is Sexual harassment? Sexual harassment is against the law in the United States. The harasser can be a man or a woman. The victim can be a man or a woman. The harasser can be the victim’s supervisor, coworker, or supervisor in another area. It must be unwelcome. This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  28. 28. Unwanted Touching / Rubbing Carmen’s story: “I work in a factory. My supervisor likes to rub my shoulders and touch me when he talks to me.” This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  29. 29. Leer / Check out Carmen’s experiences: “Sometimes my supervisor leers at me. He likes to check out all the women.” This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  30. 30. Grope Carina’s story: “Where I work, there are always men who try to grope us.” This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  31. 31. Two Types of Sexual Harassment Quid Pro Quo (something for something) Hostile Work Environment This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  32. 32. Quid Pro Quo Jose’s Story: “My supervisor is a woman. She always promises me a better position if I go out with her. Last week, I finally told her I’m not interested. She got angry and threatened to fire me.” This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  33. 33. Hostile Work Environment Alfredo’s story: “The men at my work always ridicule me because I’m gay. They like to make fun of me. They sometimes threaten me.” This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  34. 34. Affected Rosa’s experience: “Some men at work always tell obscene jokes and harass other women. They often have pornographic material lying around. I feel really bad about it. It affects me. I sometimes miss work because I’m not comfortable with the atmosphere.” This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  35. 35. Respect In your opinion, how can we show respect to our coworkers? What are some examples of appropriate workplace behavior? Discussion This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  36. 36. Farmworkers Face Abuse This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  37. 37. Discussion • How often does Carmen Diaz say that sexual harassment happens at work? Do you agree or disagree? • Why does Rosana C. believe she cannot do anything about the perpetrator who is threatening her? Do you agree or disagree? • Can unauthorized workers file a complaint? This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  38. 38. Key Terms Key term Example harass “Some men at work harass women.” harasser “He is an harasser.” victim “He is a victim of sexual harassment.” supervisor “My supervisor does not tolerate sexual harassment. Does yours?” coworker “My coworkers want to discuss the problem.” unwelcome “She always touches me. I feel uncomfortable. Her behavior is unwelcome.” leer “He likes to leer at women.” check out “They always check out the new employees.” grope “He tries to grope us.” quid pro quo “Our employer will fire anyone who engages in quid pro quo behavior.” hostile “Our workplace is very hostile.” This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  39. 39. Key Terms Key term Example environment “We have a good environment at work.” ridicule “The older men always ridicule the younger men.” affect “They always show us pornography. It affects me.” comfortable “Are you comfortable with how your coworkers act?” atmosphere “I’m not comfortable with the atmosphere at work.” respect “I wish they would respect us.” perpetrator “The police are looking for the perpetrator.” harassment “Sexual harassment is against the law.” This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  40. 40. This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  41. 41. Lesson 4: Workplace Sexual Violence • By the end of this lesson, I will: – Be able to identify opportunities and vulnerabilities many perpetrators exploit – Be able to participate in a discussion about how to avoid workplace sexual violence This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  42. 42. This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  43. 43. Escondidas en la Cosecha This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  44. 44. Hidden in the Harvest This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  45. 45. Discussion • What power did the perpetrators claim to have? • Why did the women feel they had to comply with the perpetrator’s threats? Would you agree or disagree? • What do you think women in similar situations can do to prevent sexual violence? This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  46. 46. This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  47. 47. This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  48. 48. Lesson 5: Stop Sexual Violence • In this lesson, I will: – Understand what I can do to stop workplace sexual violence – Improve my ability to report a crime to the police – File a charge with the EEOC This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  49. 49. Call the police Prepare to tell the police: • What the perpetrator looks like • Where the crime happened • What injuries you or someone suffered • If a weapon was used • How the victim knew the perpetrator • If there were any witnesses • The type and amount of force that was used or threatened by the perpetrator • The type of resistance the victim used • Did the victim say the perpetrator should stop If you are not certain about your immigration status, contact an immigration lawyer, women’s shelter first, or rape crises center first. This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  50. 50. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) “You have a Choice” “Tu Tienes una Opción” The EEOC enforces federal laws that make it illegal to discriminate. The EEOC has the power to investigate charges.This material was produced under grant SH- 27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does
  51. 51. EEOC: The Law Protects You You have the right to be safe from sexual abuse and retaliation at work The Law Protects You La Ley te Protégé • Female or male • Born in the U.S. or immigrant This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  52. 52. The EEOC “Who’s Gonna Believe Me?” “I used to think this can only happen to girls. How can I talk with anyone about this?” “Quien va a Creerme?” “I just want to do my job. But now, I don’t feel safe at work.” This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  53. 53. Call the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) This material was produced under grant SH- 27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does
  54. 54. This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  55. 55. Lesson 6: Prevention of Workplace Sexual Violence • By the end of this lesson, I will: – Better understand how to prevent workplace sexual violence – Start a conversation with my coworkers to discuss prevention strategies – Be able to ask my employer to implement prevention policies – File a complaint with OSHA This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  56. 56. Start the Conversation Raise our voices together Meet Dolly. She lives and works in New York. Organize a meeting of coworkers This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  57. 57. This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  58. 58. Role-Play and Discussion • Situation Your group wants to speak with other coworkers about making your workplace safer. What should you say to your coworkers? What do you want your employer to do? • Questions • What hazard or dangerous situation do you want to prevent? • Who will you invite to your meeting? • Where will you meet? • What do you want to change? • How can you change it? • How will coworkers react? This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  59. 59. What if? What can you do if your employer is not interested in preventing sexual harassment and violence? This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  60. 60. How to File a Complaint with OSHA Watch the OSHA presentation on how to file a complaint here or with Spanish subtitles here. This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  61. 61. Let’s File a Complaint • Describe the hazard • How many people are affected? • Did you bring it to the attention of your employer? • Did you report it to another government agency? • Do you want OSHA to reveal your name to your employer? This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  62. 62. This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  63. 63. Thank You and Congratulations! For more information about workplace sexual violence prevention: • Ask your local ESL provider or literacy council to adopt our intermediate level curriculum here • For more workplace safety and health training, visit OSHA’s Susan Harwood grantee site here. • You can receive OSHA materials here. You have completed this introductory training! This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.
  64. 64. CENTER FOR HUMAN SERVICES ______________________________________________________________________ Produced by Center for Human Services 5404 Wisconsin Ave., Suite 800 Chevy Chase, MD. 20815 www.chs-urc.org For more information, contact: Grogan Ullah Project Director / Author Gullah@urc-chs.com This material was produced under grant SH-27615-SH5 from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, U.S. Department of Labor. It does not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the U.S. Department of Labor, nor does mention of trade names, commercial products, or organizations imply endorsement by the U.S. Government.

Editor's Notes

  • Instructor’s Guide:
    Lesson 1: Workplace Violence
    Opening warm-up: Ask learners if they have ever witnessed violence in person, or if they know anyone who has witnessed violence. Have learners describe what they, or someone they know, witnessed (5 min).
    Learner Objectives: Upon completion of this lesson, participants will be able to:
    Understand the prevalence and types of workplace violence
    Be able to participate in a basic discussion about workplace violence
  • Instructor’s Guide:
    Source: “Occupational Violence,” The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/violence/
  • Instructor’s Guide:
    Source: “Occupational Violence,” The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/violence/
    Note: color coding in above map does not indicate incidences.
  • Source: “Violence Against Women in the Workplace,” AFL-CIO, http://www.aflcio.org/Issues/Civil-and-Workplace-Rights/Working-Women/Violence-Against-Women-In-The-Workplace
  • Source: Southern Poverty Law Center. “Sexual Violence Against Farmworkers: A Guidebook for Legal Providers,” 2010. http://www.splcenter.org/get-informed/publications/sexual-violence-against-farmworkers-a-guidebook-for-legal-providers
  • Instructor’s Guide:
    Source: “Workplace Violence Types,” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, https://wwwn.cdc.gov/wpvhc/Course.aspx/Slide/Unit1_5
  • Instructor’s Guide:
    Source: “Workplace Violence Types,” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, https://wwwn.cdc.gov/wpvhc/Course.aspx/Slide/Unit1_5
  • Instructor’s Guide:
    Have learners silently review the vocabulary. Ask learners for new words. Explain the new words by using them in familiar contexts. Have learners choral new words.
    *Source:
    Rape: “Victims of Sexual Violence: Statistics,” RAINN, https://www.rainn.org/statistics/victims-sexual-violence
  • Instructor’s Guide:
    Place learners in small groups. Have groups discuss one of the problems. (Suggested time: 10 minutes). Have the groups report on their discussions and solutions en plenum.

    Language target tip:

    Using a flip chart or white board, have learners focus on using “can” to anchor their discussions.
  • Instructor’s notes:

    Have learners answer the questions, en plenum.

    Answer key: 1.F; 2.F; 3.T, 4.F
  • Instructor’s Guide:
    Learner objectives: Upon completion of this lesson, participants will be able to:
    Understand employer and employee rights and responsibilities under Office of Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) enforced laws
    Understand whistleblower protections administered by OSHA
    File a complaint with OSHA
  • Instructor’s Guidance:

    We suggest that you provide trainees with a copy of OSHA’s brochure, “Worker’s Rights.” An electronic copy can be access at the following location:

    (English): https://www.osha.gov/Publications/osha3021.pdf

    (Spanish): https://www.osha.gov/Publications/3473workers-rights-spanish.pdf

    To order copies of OSHA produced Spanish language materials, visit: https://www.osha.gov/pls/publications/publication.athruz?pType=Types&pID=9
  • Instructor’s notes:

    Ask learners the following questions:

    How many people have brought a dangerous situation or hazard to an employer’s attention?
    If so, how did the employer respond?
    If not,. how do you think employers would respond?
  • Instructor’s notes:

    Engage learners in a brief discussion on the above question.
  • Instructor’s notes:

    Instructor’s notes:

    Pass out the English and/or Spanish version(s) of “OSHA At-A-Glance” / “Perfil de OSHA” to learners (see below). Have learners skim the material.

    Resources:
    Spanish: “Perfil de OSHA,” Occupational Safety and Health Administration, https://www.osha.gov/Publications/3454-B-at-a-glance-SP.pdf
    English: “OSHA At-A-Glance,” Occupational Safety and Health Administration, https://www.osha.gov/Publications/3439at-a-glance.pdf
  • Instructor’s notes:

    Ask learners if they think it is better to remain anonymous or to actively participate in an OSHA inspection.
  • Instructor’s notes:

    Engage workers in a discussion on whistleblower protections. Provide learners with a brief overview. Pass out to learners a copy of the OSHA Fact Sheet, “Filing Whistleblower Complaints under Section 11(c) of the OSH Act of 1970.” Provide learners with a few minutes to skim the document and ask questions.

    Resources: “Filing Whistleblower Complaints under Section 11(c) of the OSH Act of 1970”
    Spanish: https://www.osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3841.pdf
    English: https://www.osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3812.pdf
    Source: “The Whistleblower Protection Program,” United States Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, http://www.whistleblowers.gov
  • Instructor’s Guide:
    Have learners silently review the vocabulary. Ask learners for new words. Explain the new words by using them in familiar contexts. Have learners choral new words.
  • Instructor’s notes:

    Have learners answer the questions, en plenum.

    Answer key: 1.T; 2.F; 3.T, 4.T; 5.F; 6.F; 7.F
  • Instructor’s Guide:

    Learner Objectives: Upon completion of this lesson, participants will be able to:
    Recognize examples of inappropriate workplace behaviors
    Recognize forms of sexual harassment, including:
    Quid pro quo
    Hostile work environment


  • Instructor notes:

    Ask learners to look at the picture. Ask them if she welcomes the behavior? The following are suggested questions:

    Does the harasser have to be a man?
    Does the victim have to be a woman?
    Does the harasser have to be a supervisor?
    Have learners read the text silently.
    Check for comprehension by transforming the statements into questions, eliciting yes or no responses.

    Source: “Facts about Sexual Harassment,” United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission,” https://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/publications/fs-sex.cfm
  • Instructor’s notes:

    Using a flip chart or white board, explain common forms of quid pro quo behaviors, including the promise of promotion, increased wage, or threat of demotion, or firing, or calling immigration. Ask learners what they think victims can do if a supervisor engages in quid pro quo behavior.
  • Instructor’s notes:

    We suggest that you ask learners to relate work situations where a coworker was ridiculed or made fun of. Ask learners if whistling at others, or catcalls, or gossiping, qualifies as creating a hostile work environment. You may also want to ask them if they can recall any situations at work that may have been hostile.
  • Instructor’s Guide:

    According to the EEOC, “The victim does not have to be the person harassed but could be anyone affected by the offensive conduct.”
    Source: “Facts about Sexual Harassment,” United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission,” https://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/publications/fs-sex.cfm

  • Instructor’s Guide:

    Have learners watch the Human Rights Watch video, “Farmworkers Face Abuse,” by right clicking the title in the slide, then clicking open, or use copy and past the following address into your browser (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8jhKfyG1oU8).
  • Instructor’s Guide:

    Place learners in small groups and have them discuss the above questions. Reconvene the groups and, en plenum, collect responses. Explain to trainees that everyone, including unauthorized (“undocumented”) workers, have the right to file a complaint.

    Sources: “EEOC Reaffirms Commitment to Protecting Undocumented Workers from Discrimination,” U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, https://www.eeoc.gov/eeoc/newsroom/release/6-28-02.cfm
  • Instructor’s Guide:
    Have learners silently review the vocabulary. Ask learners for new words. Explain the new words by using them in familiar contexts. Have learners choral new words.
  • Instructor’s Guide:
    Have learners silently review the vocabulary. Ask learners for new words. Explain the new words by using them in familiar contexts. Have learners choral new words.
  • Instructor’s notes:

    Have learners answer the questions individually. Review the answers en plenum.

    Answer key: 1.F; 2.F; 3.T; 4.F; 5.F
  • Instructor’s notes:

    Review each of the five types of sexual violence with learners.
    “Obscenities” include jokes, obscene language, gestures, “undesired exposure to pornography” (National Institute of Justice);
    “Coercion” includes behavior where a person (the perpetrator) pressures another (the victim) into engaging in sexual acts;
    “Intimidation” includes any threats made by the perpetrator to the victim if sexual acts (by the victim) are not engaged in, e.g. calling immigration, firing, etc.;
    “Unwanted touching” includes any physical contact of a sexual nature without the express permission of the person being touched (the victim), and “includes intentional touching of the victim’s genitals, anus, groin, or breasts” (National Institute of Justice);
    “Sexual violence” includes sexual assault and rape

    Resources:

    “Types of Sexual Violence,” RAINN, https://www.rainn.org/types-sexual-violence
    “Rape and Sexual Violence,” National Institute of Justice,” http://www.nij.gov/topics/crime/rape-sexual-violence/pages/welcome.aspx
  • Instructor’s notes:

    Inform learners that we are going to watch an animated documentary of the three true stories. Have learners look for the forms of sexual violence in the following documentary.


    Have learners watch the short (9:55 min) documentary, in Spanish, “Escondidas en la Cosecha,” (right click the hyperlink or use your browser and copy and paste the following address: https://www.youtube.com/watch?list=UUdmqkUIfXt2cMBOLQsijMFg&v=2lDcGtv32es

    Source:
    Adriane Wu, “Escondidas en la Cosecha,” Center for Investigative Reporting, http://cironline.org/reports/escondidas-en-la-cosecha-4960. Retrieved at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?list=UUdmqkUIfXt2cMBOLQsijMFg&v=2lDcGtv32es
  • Instructor’s notes:

    Have learners prepare to see the documentary, “Hidden in the Harvest,” on sexual violence and farm work, produced by the Center for Investigative Reporting, by having learners read the pre-viewing materials (available here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7ZJSpE3cVXNV2RVVTM5MUs4VVE/view?usp=sharing)

    Have learners watch the documentary, in English, by right clicking the hyperlink or using your browser to copy and paste: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3-6Ki7w7k2c&list=UUdmqkUIfXt2cMBOLQsijMFg&index=91

    Source:
    Adriane Wu, “Hidden in the Harvest,” Center for Investigative Reporting. Retrieved at: http://arianewu.com/?udt_portfolio=hidden-in-the-harvest
  • Instructor’s notes:

    Place learners in small groups. Have them discuss the case studies using the provided questions. Have each of the groups summarize their discussion. Engage learners, en plenum, in an extended discussion on the topic, based on learners’ responses. Have learners create a list of suggestions for what people can do to avoid being victimized. Using a flip chart or white board, collect learners’ responses.

    Resources:
    Pass out the “Workplace Safety Card,” developed by Workplaces Respond to Domestic and Sexual Violence: A National Resource Center, available at:
    http://www.workplacesrespond.org/sites/default/files/imce/FWV_workplace_safetycard_fin_hirez.pdf

  • Instructor’s notes:

    Compare the list of items learners identified with the prepared list.
    Ask learners for their opinion of the following questions:

    Should women carry a cell phone, hand-held alarm, or noise device?
    Should women learn self-defense?
    How do we minimize opportunities and vulnerabilities?
    What advise would you give your daughter, sister, spouse?



    Resources:

    OSHA Fact Sheet: Workplace Violence,” Occupational Safety and Health Administration, https://www.osha.gov/OshDoc/data_General_Facts/factsheet-workplace-violence.pdf

    “Sexual Violence: Risk and Protective Factors,” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, http://www.cdc.gov/violenceprevention/sexualviolence/riskprotectivefactors.html

    “Workplace Violence Prevention Strategies and Research Needs,” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, https://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2006-144/pdfs/2006-144.pdf
  • Instructor’s notes:

    Have learners answer the questions individually. Review the answers en plenum.

    Answer key: 1.T; 2.T; 3.F; 4.F; 5.F
  • Instructor’s notes:

    Review with learners the types of questions police may ask. Have learners role-play an interview between police and witnesses to a violent crime.

    Resources:

    “Violence Against Women,” Office on Women’s Health, United States Health and Human Services, http://www.womenshealth.gov/violence-against-women/types-of-violence/violence-against-immigrant-refugee-women.html

    “Interview Strategies for Sexual Assault and Rape Investigations,” Public Safety , http://inpublicsafety.com/2015/04/interview-strategies-for-sexual-assault-and-rape-investigations/ 

    “Pocket Guide for Police Response to Sexual Assault,” United States Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime, https://ovc.ncjrs.gov/sartkit/tools/lawenforcement/Pocket%20Guide%20for%20Police%20Response%20to%20Sexual%20Assault.pdf.pdf
  • Instructor’s notes:

    Have learners watch the EEOC produced video 30 second videos, “You have a Choice,” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xZCoxMolCbk), and/or
    “Tu Tienes una Opción” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-OJPtIbwXYo).”
  • Instructor’s notes:

    Have learners watch the short EEOC produced 20 second videos, “The Law Protects You” (English: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2XFFzOsxik) and/or “La Ley te Protégé” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oJj15t-Jjx4)
  • Instructor’s notes:

    Have learners watch the EEOC produced short 30 second videos, “Who’s Gonna Believe Me?” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=liwEuY46PVY) and/or “Quien va a Creerme?” (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7C-wcm8_cVM)
  • Instructor’s notes:

    Have learners watch the short 20 second EEOC produced video, "Hablalo" La Comision Para la Igualdad en el Empleo (EEOC).” Retrieved at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ln5vZV6eZuM

    Explain to learners that they can call the EEOC to start the process, and operators will help provide assistance. However, to file a charge they must either file in person at a field office or file a charge by mail.

    Working in small groups, have learners prepare to file a written charge with the EEOC. Have learners develop a letter to the EEOC. The following document provides a template that learners may use to develop their letters: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B7ZJSpE3cVXNZEl1SEVsTWtvNTg/view?usp=sharing
    Print the document and share with learners.

    Resources:

    “How to File a Charge of Employment Discrimination,” Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, https://www.eeoc.gov/employees/howtofile.cfm

    “EEOC Office List and Jurisdictional Map,” Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, https://www.eeoc.gov/field/








  • Instructor’s notes:

    Have learners answer the questions individually. Review the answers en plenum.

    Answer key: 1.T; 2.F; 3.F; 4.F
  • Instructor’s notes:

    Have learners watch the United States Department of Labor produced video, “Start the Conversation,” (right click the hyperlink, and then click “open.” It is also available here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KSQFKHCgDqc).

    Play the video at half speed. Ask learners for new words or phrases. Write the new words or phrases on the board or flip chart. Explain the new words in familiar contexts. Have learners chorally repeat the new words or phrases.

    Play the video at normal speed.

    Engage learners in a quick discussion, en plenum, on the main themes, using the following suggested questions:
     
    How do you think most coworkers would react to an invitation to discuss the possibility of improving working conditions?
    Do you think most employees would like to discuss wages, health and safety at work?
    Why would some employees like to participate in a discussion on work related themes?
    Why would some employees be afraid to participate in a discussion on work related themes?
    How do you think most employers would react to workers getting together to discuss their job situation?
    How can you propose improving your work culture without causing employers to feel threatened?


  • Instructor notes:

    Workers have the right to complain to employers about dangerous situations, including workplace sexual violence. We suggest that it is best if workers (a) join together to approach employers, and (b) provide employers with some suggestions. The slide posits three suggestions:

    Zero-Tolerance Policy
    Workers may consider asking employers to establish written policies expressing that sexual harassment/violence will not be tolerated;
    That employers post there policies in a language workers can understand.
    Safety training
    Workers may consider asking employers to provide sexual harassment and violence safety training, and make it mandatory for all supervisors.
    OSHA consultation
    OSHA will provide a free consultation to employers to assist employers to make the workplace safer.

    We suggest that the instructor discuss these three options with learners and get their input and insights.

    Resources:

    “On –Site Consultation,” United States Department of Labor, Office of Safety and Health Administration, https://www.osha.gov/dcsp/smallbusiness/consult.html
     
    “Sample Workplace Sexual Harassment Policies,” Office Depot, http://www.officedepot.com/a/businesstools/tools/sxhrst_m/;jsessionid=0000ndiahM5Vf8gxiaNtNG5fMRg:17h4h78ta

    “Business Case for Safety and Health,” United States Department of Labor, Office of Safety and Health Administration, https://www.osha.gov/dcsp/products/topics/businesscase/index.html
  • Instructor’s notes:


    Place learners in small groups of five to six individuals. Have them consider the following situation:
     
    Your group wants to speak with other coworkers about making your workplace safer. What should you say to your coworkers? How will coworkers react?

    Have groups develop a short drama. Have groups develop characters, consider a situation at work, and discuss how they would like to improve it.

  • Instructor’s notes:

    Engage learners in a brief discussion on the above question. Use a flip chart or white board to collect responses.
    Our answer, as posited in the next slide, is to contact OSHA and file a complaint.
  • Instructor’s Guide:
    Have learners watch the provided YouTube video(s). Duration: 6.36 minutes.
    To link to the YouTube video, right click the provided link(s) in the slide and then click “open link.” Or use your browser to link below:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=plrX7JU_8x0
    (With Spanish subtitles)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EsoFu3qcmz0
    Provide learners with the number for OSHA:  1-800-321-6742

    Instructors should also alert learners that not all farms fall under OSHA jurisdiction. Farms that only employ immediate family members or farms with 10 or less employees are not under OSHA jurisdiction. (this exemption, however, does not apply if the operation has maintained a temporary labor camp within the last twelve months, OSHA directive CPL 02-00-51)

  • Instructor’s notes:

    Have learners work in small groups to complete an OSHA complaint form. The forms can be accessed at the following links:

    (English) “Notice of Alleged Safety or Health Violation” (https://www.osha.gov/oshforms/osha7.pdf)

    (Spanish) “Notificación de una Queja en Seguridad y Salud” (https://www.osha.gov/oshforms/OSHA7_SPANISH.pdf)

    Inform learners that they have the right to have a representative file for them, including a member of the clergy, representative of a community-based organization, lawyer, or other person.
  • Instructor’s notes:

    Have learners answer the questions individually. Review the answers en plenum.

    Answer key: 1.T; 2.F; 3.T; 4.T; 5.F
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