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A former actor and director, Greg Owen-Boger is now the Vice President of                      Turpin Communication, a pre...
Video Production Basics           Video Production              1. Start with a well-planned instructional design         ...
Lighting that Flatters       Flatter your facial features by lighting yourself                                     well.  ...
Setting Up Your Studio         Consider the best location to meet your goals.                                     Shooting...
Editing      When editing, keep things simple. Avoid the                                     temptation to use fancy trans...
Engaging Learners On Camera           Find your focus.        The key to looking & sounding natural on video is to        ...
Be Clear, Concise,         The first step to a successful video shoot is to start with       Conversational, Not         a...
SAMPLE Excerpt from a Shooting ScriptClip     Visual           Content                                                    ...
NOTESProducing_Engaging_eLeraning_Video_Budget_Handout_Draft_1_10_23_12.docx   page 9Copyright ©2012 by Turpin Communication
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HANDOUT for Producing Engaging eLearning Video On a Budget (AKA Down & Dirty Video)

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This handout is a supplement to the Presentation Deck for "Producing Engaging eLearning Video on a Budget," which was presented Oct. 2012 at Training Magazine's Learning 3.0 conference in Chicago. Presented by Greg Owen-Boger, VP at Turpin Communication, a presentation and facilitation skills training company.

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HANDOUT for Producing Engaging eLearning Video On a Budget (AKA Down & Dirty Video)

  1. 1. A former actor and director, Greg Owen-Boger is now the Vice President of Turpin Communication, a presentation and facilitation skills training company based in Chicago. Schooled in management and the performing arts along with his entrepreneurial spirit, Greg brings a diverse set of skills and experiences to the organization. He joined Turpin in 1995 as a cameraman and quickly worked his way up. He now serves as a communication trainer and coach for Turpin’s largest clients. Since 2006, he has overseen all aspects of their eLearning and blended learning platforms including instructional design, script development, video production, on-camera coaching, and LMS deployment. He also appears on camera as a subject matter expert. Earlier this year Greg led an initiative to launch Find Your Focus Video, a production wing of Turpin Communication, which helps eLearning professionals and small businesses create effective web-based videos on a budget. Greg is the Director of Technology for the Chicagoland Chapter of ASTD and is the Managing Director of Interrobang Theatre Project. greg@turpincommunication.com || 773-239-2523 turpincommunication.com || findyourfocusvideo.comProducing_Engaging_eLeraning_Video_Budget_Handout_Draft_1_10_23_12.docx page 1Copyright ©2012 by Turpin Communication
  2. 2. Video Production Basics Video Production 1. Start with a well-planned instructional design Principles for with clear learning objectives eLearning 2. Consider your brand Then: • Identify video opportunities to support #1 • Shoot video consistent with #2 • Eliminate distractions for both Camera Type, Placement When choosing a camera, consider: Angle & Framing • Standard vs. high definition • Media storage and communication with editing software • Audio quality & capture method Place the camera a good distance from you and zoom in. Putting the camera too close can distort your facial features. Angle the camera so that it is at eye level, which is the most natural placement from the viewer’s perspective. Placing it too high or too low can look strange. youtu.be/Im-d5sFe2GQ Frame yourself in an interesting way. Follow the rule of thirds and position your head within the frame at roughly the intersection of the lines in the illustration. The rule of thirds Allow some headroom and looking room so you don’t appear cramped. Adjust the tilt so that horizontal and vertical lines in the shot appear level.Producing_Engaging_eLeraning_Video_Budget_Handout_Draft_1_10_23_12.docx page 2Copyright ©2012 by Turpin Communication
  3. 3. Lighting that Flatters Flatter your facial features by lighting yourself well. It’s best to start with a dark room and build a 3-point lighting plot from scratch. Point 1: The Key Light (brightest) should be positioned behind the camera, off to the side and at roughly a 45 degree angle above your head. Point 2: The Fill Light (second brightest) should be placed on the opposite side of the camera and used to youtu.be/wC0V9nA_Iic fill in the shadows created by the Key. It too should be about 45 degrees above your head. 3-point lighting Point 3: The Back Light (dimmest) should be placed behind and to one side. It provides dimension to the video by lighting your hair and shoulders. Diffuse the light to soften the shadows. Use diffusion materials purchased from a camera store or improvise using parchment paper or vellum. Everyone’s features are different, so start with the 3- point lighting scheme and make adjustments for your particular situation. Audio Capture Built-in microphones may not be good enough. If using an external microphone, place it a natural distance from you to capture the volume level suggested by the camera. It should not be in the shot nor create shadows. Your best option is to plug the microphone into the camera itself. If that’s not an option, capture a second audio track through a computer and synch with the master track when editing. If the audio you capture has a thin quality or has faint echoes, do what you can to soften the hard surfaces in the room. Hang acoustic foam panels or draperies on the walls, and lay down carpeting.Producing_Engaging_eLeraning_Video_Budget_Handout_Draft_1_10_23_12.docx page 3Copyright ©2012 by Turpin Communication
  4. 4. Setting Up Your Studio Consider the best location to meet your goals. Shooting in the learner’s natural habitat is often a good way to connect with them. • Should you be in an office or out in the field? • Would it be better to be in a branded or green screen studio? Decorate your set to work in harmony with your brand; try to keep things balanced and eliminate distractions. Avoid sets that look too sterile, staged or cluttered. Green Screens Green screens require extra care when setting up the shots. The screen should be free of wrinkles, and it’s best to have several feet of depth between the subject and the backdrop. This will separate the subject from the inserted surroundings. Lighting You can help that separation by lighting the screen and the subject independently. The screen should be lit evenly using diffused lights from above or the sides. The subject should be lit using three-point lighting. It’s youtu.be/M_WdLkaOUic helpful if the back light is rather strong providing even more contrast between the subject and the screen. Wardrobe, Hair & Keep your appearance appropriate for your Complexion organization, choose items that flatter, and eliminate distractions. When choosing your wardrobe, opt for solids that contrast with each other and your surroundings. Avoid: • Loud patterns and stripes, which can cause video “noise.” • White, which can negatively affect the white balance setting on the camera. Pay attention to your hair. Keep it off your face, and get rid of fly-aways. The camera and lighting can make your complexion look unattractive. Improve your skin’s appearance by applying a light layer of skin-tone powder. Reapply often to tone down shine created by the lights.Producing_Engaging_eLeraning_Video_Budget_Handout_Draft_1_10_23_12.docx page 4Copyright ©2012 by Turpin Communication
  5. 5. Editing When editing, keep things simple. Avoid the temptation to use fancy transitions and effects. They do little to advance the learning, and call too much attention to themselves. When shopping for editing software, look for the ability to: • Export and work with course-building software, SCORM and LMS • Import a variety of video & image formats • Run multiple video & audio tracks • Edit sound including noise reduction • Add text & titlesProducing_Engaging_eLeraning_Video_Budget_Handout_Draft_1_10_23_12.docx page 5Copyright ©2012 by Turpin Communication
  6. 6. Engaging Learners On Camera Find your focus. The key to looking & sounding natural on video is to Be yourself. be engaged. This means you need to be in control of Only better. your thoughts, your movement and your speech. To do this, work hard to: • Find your focus: Pause to calm your racing mind and to think clearly. • Be yourself: Make sure the person captured on video looks, sounds, and acts like the most professional and conversational version of the real you. • Only better: You may need to adapt to the complexities of video by slowing your speaking pace, moving less, smiling more, and so on. Identify Who You Are Address a single person with whom you have a Talking To friendly relationship. Doing this, rather than speaking to a faceless group of people, will make your video feel more personal. It will also positively affect your tone, enthusiasm, and word choice. Make solid eye contact with the camera’s lens. Avoid looking to the side or beyond the camera; both will make you appear as if you’re disengaged or reading from a script. youtu.be/P2p2I_MPingProducing_Engaging_eLeraning_Video_Budget_Handout_Draft_1_10_23_12.docx page 6Copyright ©2012 by Turpin Communication
  7. 7. Be Clear, Concise, The first step to a successful video shoot is to start with Conversational, Not an excellent instructional design from which a script or Scripted detailed outline can be written. (see handout, page 8) Then, the key to sounding spontaneous and conversational is to wean yourself off of it by creating notes from which you can improvise. We recommend this process. Start with Excellent Instructional Design Write Script or Outline for Video Portions Gather Thoughts, Make Connections youtu.be/wzsAezUbAvQ Create Notes that you May or May Not Use Review Out Loud Smile, Engage Your Friend, and… Action! Other Recommendations • Learn to sneak a peek • Be patient & ask it of others • Take breaks • Break it down into manageable clips • Understand what can be edited & what can’t • Do as many takes as it takes • Do not settle for just OK, but do not strive for perfection either Coaching Others It’s critical for the on-camera talent that direction/coaching come from just one person. Help them understand: • They don’t have to be memorized or be perfect • They should sound conversational • Let the personalities shine and keep their enthusiasm up Coach them: • To pause, think, breathe • Engage the camera (one person, friendly relationship) Keep things pleasant, be patient, take breaks, and help them break their script down into manageable clips.Producing_Engaging_eLeraning_Video_Budget_Handout_Draft_1_10_23_12.docx page 7Copyright ©2012 by Turpin Communication
  8. 8. SAMPLE Excerpt from a Shooting ScriptClip Visual Content NotesClip 6 Video of Greg Once you’ve zeroed in on the one person you’re speaking to, you’re more likely to sound conversational and natural. However, if you’ve done your planning, you probably have a script or at least an outline that you’re working from. So, how do you follow your script, engage your friend AND sound conversational? The answer lies in not memorizing your script or using an ad hoc teleprompter. While these ideas may seem logical, they don’t work because: • Stiff • Unnatural • Reading Instead make notes for yourself and improvise around them. Now, I’m not recommending never writing out a script. The exercise of writing it out can really help you focus your thoughts, surface new ideas, and logically string concepts together across multiple video clips. But once the camera is rolling you need to abandon the script, scribble notes, place them within eyesight, and improvise your way around them.Clip 7 Cut, fade back Here’s how I do it. Pull script into view to Greg • For me, no more than 2/3 page and refer to it. • Before camera rolls I look at my script Should I write on the Here’s my script for this shot you’re watching right now. I have it right here out of the shot so I can white board? Just hold reference it at any time. But before we turned on the camera, I jotted down some notes on a white board a marker? and placed it right there (point to white board placement). Before hitting record: • Review notes, get my head together • Engage the camera • Go Sometimes I can get through the entire clip without any trouble. Other times I need to sneak a peek. (Show example.) It should look like I’m looking into thin air and grabbing a thought. But it’s a learned skill, and I’m not always successful. Experiment and see what works for you.Clip 8 Fade through As I’ve said, the goal should be to sound conversational. This can be challenging if your script is too long. Use this fade as an black, back to Now, you may have noticed that we just faded through black in the edit. This is a technique you can use example of what to do Greg to cut your script into more manageable chunks, which will make you more likely to sound conversational to break a clip into and natural. manageable chunks.Producing_Engaging_eLeraning_Video_Budget_Handout_Draft_1_10_23_12.docx page 8Copyright ©2012 by Turpin Communication
  9. 9. NOTESProducing_Engaging_eLeraning_Video_Budget_Handout_Draft_1_10_23_12.docx page 9Copyright ©2012 by Turpin Communication

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