Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Green Gold project Component 3 operational report 2014

36 views

Published on

Green Gold project Component 3 - Extension service

Published in: Environment
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Green Gold project Component 3 operational report 2014

  1. 1.                           Green Gold Phase IV: Component 3 Agricultural Extension Service to Provide Practicable Knowledge for the Herders February 2, 2015 Annual Progress Report 2014
  2. 2.   1    Contents  Abbreviations ......................................................................................................................................... 3  Basic Information ................................................................................................................................... 4  General data of the component and phase ........................................................................................ 4  Strategic Review and Outlook ............................................................................................................... 4  Main results achieved and implementation performance of the component ................................... 4  Main steering implications for the next period of interventions ....................................................... 4  1.  Introduction .................................................................................................................................... 5  1.1  Short description of the component and its intervention strategy ........................................ 5  1.2  Update of the stakeholder analysis ........................................................................................ 5  1.3  Evolution of the context (in particular political risks and opportunities) ............................... 5  1.4  Strategic link to outcomes of Cooperation Strategy/MTP and/or outcomes at country level   5  1.5  Eventual indication of bilateral or multilateral issues for policy dialogue ............................. 5  2.  Outcomes achieved in 2014 ........................................................................................................... 6  2.1  Description of achievement in 2014 of outcome indicators measured against baseline and  target values (if available) and reflecting quantitative and qualitative dimensions of the  achievement. ...................................................................................................................................... 6  2.2  Critical and transparent assessment of outcome achievement or assessment of likelihood  to achieve the outcomes in the current phase if the outcome is not yet documentable. ................. 6  2.3  If feasible, present information on direct and indirect, positive and negative and  unintended effects of the intervention. ............................................................................................. 7  2.4  Information on progress of the implementation of SDC transversal themes on gender,  governance and human rights based on the monitoring results. ....................................................... 8  2.5  Illustration of the perspectives of involved stakeholders in the form of testimonies and/or  other illustrations of main results and outcomes achieved. .............................................................. 8  3.  Outputs and Performance according to Yearly Plan of Operation 2014 .................................... 10  3.1  Summary of output delivery (tangible products such as goods and services) based on a  comparison with the planned outputs, and its contribution to outcomes ...................................... 10  3.2  Implementation constraints and ways to overcome them .................................................. 11  3.3  Eventual changes to main assumptions ................................................................................ 11  4.  Finances and Management .......................................................................................................... 12  4.1  Percentage of budget spent vs. planned per outcome ......................................................... 12  4.2  Comments on budget deviations respectively over/under spending, and outlook for the  rest of the phase ............................................................................................................................... 12  4.3  Appraisal on how efficiently inputs were converted into outputs ....................................... 12  4.4  Reference to activities and brief explanations if there were major differences between the  executed and the planned activities ................................................................................................. 13 
  3. 3.   2    4.5  Human Resources including Diversity Management and issues on the organisational level  that affected the management of the component ........................................................................... 13  5.  Lessons Learnt .............................................................................................................................. 14  5.1  Good practice and innovations working with key partners, beneficiaries, interagency  collaboration, but also obstacles and difficulties ............................................................................. 14  5.2  If available, important findings from reviews and self‐evaluations ...................................... 14                       
  4. 4.   3    Abbreviations    AFPUG    Aimag Federation of Pasture User Groups  APUG    Association of Pasture User Groups  CSO    Civil Society Organisation  DIA    Department of Industry and Agriculture  HQ    Headquarters  IRIM    Independent Research Institute of Mongolia  ITL    International Team Leader  MIA    Ministry of Industry and Agriculture  MOFA    Ministry of Food and Agriculture  MOI    Ministry of Industry  MSUA    Mongolian State University of Agriculture  MTR    Mid‐Term Review  NAEC    National Agricultural Extension Centre  NGO    Non‐Governmental Organisation  PCU    Project Coordination Unit  PIU    Project Implementation Unit  PUG    Pasture User Groups  UQ    The University of Queensland  UQ ID    UQ International Development group                     
  5. 5.   4    Basic Information  General data of the component and phase  Project:   Green Gold  Phase:    IV (November 2013 to December 2016)  Component:  Agricultural Extension  Strategic Review and Outlook  Main results achieved and implementation performance of the component   Herders  increasingly  perceive  agricultural  extension  services  as  useful  (51.6%  in  2014  vs.  11.2% in 2013);   Capacity to coordinate and deliver demand‐driven extension services is built at 3 aimags and  26 soums;   Herder  Service  Centres  as  central  soum‐level  facilities  for  herder  training  and  exchange  established in 20% of soums in Green Gold area;   Extension cooperation agreements established between APUGs and AHBUs in 28% of soums  in Green Gold area;   Trained herder‐to‐herder advisors available at 34% of PUGs;   10 percent of PUG‐members engage in field‐based learning, advisory services and herder‐to‐ herder exchange;   15 percent PUG‐members receive extension messages via printed and audio‐visual media;   Extension services promote sustainable practices of pastoral livestock herding;   44 herder women among PUG members engaging in collective processing of animal products.    Main steering implications for the next period of interventions   Intensify dialogue with MOFA and DIAs and strengthen the linkage of the pilot intervention to  the Government extension system to facilitate delivery and funding of extension services by  local governments;   Facilitate  user‐financed  extension  service  delivery  by  herder  cooperatives  coordinated  by  APUGs;   Define focal aimags and soums for enabling comparative outcome assessment at different  levels of intervention intensity in different areas;   Include a gender dimension in the herder and exchange strategy and develop gender‐sensitive  extension media and messages for ensuring impacts on male and female herders;   Establish a participatory monitoring and evaluation system as a mechanism to gauge needs  and demands at the herder level on a continuous basis;   Maximise  synergy  with  other  Green  Gold  components  and  SDC‐funded  projects  through  collaborative planning and regular communication and exchange. 
  6. 6.   5    1. Introduction  1.1 Short description of the component and its intervention strategy  The Agricultural Extension Component aims to “deliver useful knowledge and services to herders  (f/m)” through targeted interventions at the following tiers:  1) Strengthening the Government extension system;  2) Building capacities and structures for demand‐driven extension services;   3) Piloting demand‐driven extension services.  Key elements of the implementation approach include: Stakeholder consultation at central and  local  levels;  Training  and  mobilisation  of  master  trainers,  extension  facilitators  and  herder  advisors; Establishment and operation of herder service centres at soums; Facilitation of herder  learning and exchange through experience sharing events and field‐based training; Production  and use of extension media and materials; and Participatory monitoring and evaluation.  1.2 Update of the stakeholder analysis  Key stakeholders of the component at the central level include MOFA (MIA until December 2014),  NAEC and MUSL (MSUA until December 2015). MOFA coordinates DIAs and NAEC. NAEC, while  lacking the mandate and budget of regular coordinating extension services at local levels, still  holds the mandate as the key actor in the Government extension system at the central level. MULS  is the head organisation of agricultural higher education and research.  At the aimag level, key stakeholders include AFPUGs as implementing partners of the component  and DIAs, in their function of coordinating AHBUs, as government partners. At the soum level,  both APUGs and AHBUs are implementing partners, with APUGs holding the responsibility for  administration of funds provided by the component.  The target population includes approximately 75 thousand herder households in 126 soums of 7  target aimags (Arkhangai, Bayankhongor, Bayan‐Ulgii, Gobi‐Altai, Khovd, Uws and Zavkhan) of  Green Gold, including 32 thousand herder households structured in 787 PUGs (as of 2014). In its  pilot year 2014, the component targeted approximately 9000 member households of 265 PUGs in  26 soums in Khovd, Uws and Bayan‐Ulgii aimags.   1.3 Evolution of the context (in particular political risks and opportunities)  The change of government in November 2014 involved the splitting of MIA in MOFA and MOI.  Agricultural extension may now take a more significant role within the strategic portfolio of MOFA  than of the former MIA. However, NAEC is about to cut half of its 26 staff positions and merge  with the Livestock Protection Fund, and AHBUs are possibly to lose one of the 3 staff positions. It  is unclear how these changes would affect the mandates and capacities of NAEC and AHBUs, which  are among the key stakeholders of the component at the central and local levels.  1.4 Strategic link to outcomes of Cooperation Strategy/MTP and/or outcomes at  country level  While  specifically  addressing  the  need  for  demand‐driven  extension  services  for  herders,  the  component contributes to the following outcomes specified within the “Agriculture and Food  Security” domain of the Swiss Cooperation Strategy 2013‐2016: Improved productivity of farmers  and herders; and Improved livelihood security for herders and farmers.  1.5 Eventual indication of bilateral or multilateral issues for policy dialogue  The component did not identify issues of relevance for bilateral or multilateral dialogue in 2014. 
  7. 7.   6    2. Outcomes achieved in 2014  2.1 Description of achievement in 2014 of outcome indicators measured against  baseline  and  target  values  (if  available)  and  reflecting  quantitative  and  qualitative dimensions of the achievement.  Outcome 3: Demand‐driven extension service system is set up  Indicator  Description  Baseline  2013  Target 2014  Performance  2014  3.1. Perception of  usefulness of  extension services  by herders (f/m)  Percentage of responses  assessing extension services as  ‘useful’ and ‘very useful’ in a  representative survey with  Green Gold target groups  11.2  30  51.6*  3.2. Perception by  local authorities  (f/m) of  usefulness of  extension services  sustainability of  livestock herding   Percentage of responses  assessing extension services as  ‘useful’ and ‘very useful’ in a  survey with aimag and soum  government representatives in  the intervention area the  component  N/A  90  96.2**  * 2014 Annual monitoring survey for the SDC Cooperation Strategy 2013‐2016 by IRIM.  ** 2014 Monitoring survey of the Green Gold Agricultural Extension Component.  The  2014  annual  survey  of  IRIM  confirms  that  agricultural  extension  services  are  increasingly  perceived by herders (f/m) as useful (46.6% in 2014 as compared to 9% in 2013) or very useful (5%  in 2014 as compared to 2.2% in 2013). Furthermore, the share of respondents with ‘no opinion’  on agricultural extension services was reduced from 86.9% in 2013 to 39.3%. This comparison  leads to the conclusion that the Green Gold Agricultural Extension Component, in its pilot year  2014, managed to meet the demands of herders for improved access to information, services,  technologies and markets, and learning and exchange opportunities.   The  piloting  of  demand‐driven  extension  services  by  Green  Gold  also  built  awareness  of  the  usefulness of extension services among aimag and soum level authorities. The monitoring survey  of the component confirms that directors of DIAs and soum governors and heads of AHBUs in the  intervention area of 2014, who participated in the survey, largely perceive extension services as  useful for improving the sustainability of pastoral livestock herding.  2.2 Critical and transparent assessment of outcome achievement or assessment of  likelihood to achieve the outcomes in the current phase if the outcome is not  yet documentable.  The 2014 performance of the outcome indicator ‘Perception of usefulness of extension services by  herders (f/m)’ is to be considered with caution since an agricultural extension service system was  largely non‐existent in 2013. Many herders only became familiar with extension services through  the Green Gold pilot in 2014. Therefore, the 2014 performance of the indicator presents de facto  the baseline, with a high level of subjectiveness involved. This interpretation also applies to the  2014 performance of the outcome indicator 3.2 ‘Perception by local authorities (f/m) of usefulness  of extension services piloted by Green Gold’. Rather, the relatively high performance levels of both 
  8. 8.   7    indicators in 2014 express the overall satisfaction of both herders and local authorities with the  introduction of extension services by Green Gold. Less subjective assessments involving critical  reflection on the approach and services piloted are expected in 2015, when both herders and local  authorities will have become more familiar with agricultural extension.  While  the  outcome  assessment  in  2014  reflected  short‐term  effects  of  the  component,  a  sustainability dimension with a practical approach of measurement is needed. The component  needs a stronger focus on establishing self‐sustaining extension services and its outcomes should  include an increase in the allocation of public and private funds to extension services. Hence,  outcome  indicator  3.2  needs  to  be  modified  to  measure  public  funds  allocated  for  extension  services; and an additional indicator measuring private funds spent on extension services should  be integrated in the performance assessment of the component in 2015 and 2016.  The component engaged with DIAs in 3 aimags and AHBUs in 26 soums as local coordinators and  providers of Government extension services in its 2014 pilot intervention. However, the pilot  activities were mainly funded by Green Gold, with a rather insignificant contribution by herders.  In 2015 and 2016, co‐funding of extension services by local governments needs to be facilitated.  This is achievable, but requires intensive dialogue of the component with DIAs as well as MOFA.  In a best‐case scenario, aimag‐level frameworks for extension services within a national policy  framework, such as the “Mongolian Livestock” program, define the responsibility of the central  and  aimag  governments  as  a  provider  of  funds  for  extension  services  while  underlining  the  supporting role of the component and the limited contribution of Green Gold funds for project‐ specific purposes.   Facilitation of private funding and delivery of extension services by the component is relatively  difficult, but feasible in the intervention area, in which herders are aware of the usefulness of  extension services and trained facilitators are available at APUGs. Most APUGs have established  herder  cooperatives  as  their  commercial  arms,  and  many  of  these  APUG‐based  herder  cooperatives are operated on a self‐sustaining basis. The herder cooperatives are continuously  expanding and are starting to benefit from economies of scale. Hence, larger herder cooperatives  are placed in the best position to provide advisory services to their members and finance the  services with a small proportion of their surpluses. An initial dialogue facilitated by the component  in 2014 revealed that the APUG‐based herder cooperatives indeed are willing to spend funds on  delivery of information and advisory services.  2.3 If feasible, present information on direct and indirect, positive and negative and  unintended effects of the intervention.  A major effect of the pilot intervention was to strengthen the position of APUGs as competent  partners of soum governments. Funds for the pilot intervention were largely administered by  APUGs, and an extension cooperation agreement between the APUG and the soum government  was facilitated in each soum in the intervention area. The APUGs involved in the Green Gold  extension pilot are filling the gap left by a dysfunctional Government extension system and are  effectively assisting the soum governments in facilitating sustainable changes in livestock herding  practices and herder livelihoods. While project funding of extension services is of limited duration  and the responsibility for extension services is to be largely shifted to the soum governments, the  APUGs will still be valuable partners of Government extension services due to their facilitation  expertise, experiences with extension services and the community structures they coordinate.  Furthermore, the leaders of APUGs utilise their facilitation skills in managing herder cooperatives  and will potentially establish cooperative‐based advisory services. 
  9. 9.   8    A further effect of the component in its pilot year was the initiation of a paradigm shift in the  agricultural extension system. Our Participatory Needs and Opportunity Assessment in early 2014  revealed that there was no clear definition of extension, but rather a common perception of  extension as the transfer of scientific progress and extension workers as professionals possessing  a high level of technical expertise. The component, on the other hand, introduced a concept  highlighting the role of extension services in the facilitation of access and opportunities to farmers  and  herders.  This  perspective  does  not  expect  AHBU  staff  to  be  highly  qualified  experts,  but  encourages  them  to  facilitate  the  access  to  the  expertise  that  is  not  locally  available.  It  also  acknowledges that many herders already possess valuable indigenous knowledge that needs to  be  shared  with  other  herders  through  herder‐to‐herder  exchange.  The  concept  has  been  implemented in the pilot intervention, engaging APUG and AHBU staff as facilitators and PUG  leaders  as  herder  advisors  to  facilitate  herder  learning  and  exchange.  The  pilot  continues  to  demonstrate to local governments that, backed up by a support structure at the aimag level,  extension services at the soum level can be carried out with limited local capacity as well.  2.4 Information on progress of the implementation of SDC transversal themes on  gender, governance and human rights based on the monitoring results.  Two gender mainstreaming strategies were applied by the component in 2014: compliance with  a 30% quota for female participants in training and exchange activities, as far as they are not  specifically  targeting  men;  and  supporting  collective  actions  of  herder  women  to  generate  additional  incomes  through  processing  of  animal  products  such  as  milk  and  wool.  The  performances were as follows: the share of female participants in training and exchange activities  varied between 20 and 35 percent, averaging at 25%; and 44 women were engaged in small‐scale  milk processing businesses, which were established in 3 soums.  2.5 Illustration  of  the  perspectives  of  involved  stakeholders  in  the  form  of  testimonies and/or other illustrations of main results and outcomes achieved.  Testimonies of different stakeholders, as noted in minutes of consultation meetings at central,  aimag and soum levels, are provided below.  “The field‐based training approach introduced by the component is the only effective way of  herder learning.”  B.Binye, Senior Specialist, Ministry of Food Agriculture  “We will continue to support the component with all the support we can provide as the pilot  intervention  of  the  component  is  in  full  compliance  with  our  goal  to  facilitate  self‐sustaining  development of herder communities.”  Ch.Belegsaikhan, Director of the National Agricultural Extension Centre  “Many projects failed to improve on extension services in Mongolia because they did not engage  with the local governments. The strong engagement of soum governments in the Green Gold  extension pilot, on the other hand, significantly increases the probability of long lasting impacts  of the intervention.”  D.Davaadorj, Specialist of the National Agricultural Extension Centre  “With the support of the component, extension education will become a trademark of MSUA. I  have now understood that it is about making the graduates of MSUA able to apply their knowledge  in practice, regardless of where they work or what businesses they engage in.” 
  10. 10.   9    B.Buyanzaya, Head of the Department of Academic Policy Coordination,  Mongolian State University of Agriculture  “In the socialist times, the leaders of kolkhozes and negdels not only were experts in livestock  management but also facilitated collective actions and knowledge transfer among herders. The  extension  services  piloted  by  Green  Gold,  as  I  see  them,  are  reviving  this  tradition,  and  are  effectively managing to achieve sustainable results.”  Z.Luvsan, Director of the Department of Industry and Agriculture of Khovd aimag  “The Green Gold intervention in the extension service system has established the essential link  between policies for improving the sustainability of pastoral animal husbandry and the everyday  practices of herders.”  D.Oktyabri, Governor of Zereg soum, Khovd aimag  “While it has been assumed that herders are generally reluctant to learn and change the way they  have been doing things, I have understood through my engagement in the Green Gold extension  pilot  that  herders  are  actually  eager  to  learn  if  only  we  give  them  the  chance  to  experience  different practices and learn from each other.”  A.Gantulga, Animal breeding specialist of AHBU in Mankhan soum, Khovd aimag  “Through the innovation pilot and training activities supported by the component, herders are  now saving 15% of the costs of wool transportation”.  T.Altansukh, Head of the Association of Pasture User Groups of Must sum, Khovd aimag  “I appreciate the balance between training and awareness building activities aiming for long‐term  impacts and collective actions of herders with visible results such as forage cropping. Both are  important.”  O.Buyanjargal, Herder and PUG‐leader in Naranbulag soum, Uws aimag                       
  11. 11.   10    3. Outputs and Performance according to Yearly Plan of Operation  2014  3.1 Summary  of  output  delivery  (tangible  products  such  as  goods  and  services)  based  on  a  comparison  with  the  planned  outputs,  and  its  contribution  to  outcomes  Indicator  Baseline  2013  Target  2014  Performance  2014  Output 3.1. Framework of the Government Extension Service is streamlined.  Capacity to coordinate and deliver demand‐driven extension services is built at aimag and soum  levels.  Number of aimags with a team of qualified Master  Trainers (f/m=30/70)  0  3  3  %  of  soums  with  a  team  of  qualified  Extension  Facilitators (f/m=30/70)  0  25  28  Output 3.2. Relevant extension messages and services are elaborated, tested and used.  Pilot  extension  services  in  Green  Gold  areas  promote  sustainable  practices  of  livestock  and  rangeland management.  % of soums in GG area with Herder Service Centres  as  central  soum‐level  facilities  for  herder  training  and exchange.  0  20  20  %  of  PUGs  applying  photo  point  monitoring  of  rangelands  0  5  8  % of PUGs adopted sustainable herd management  practices  0  1  1  Area of forage cultivation by PUGs, ha  15  60  85  % of PUGs contracted local vets  0  5  6  Number  of  herder  women  organised  in  groups  engaged in processing of animal products  0  30  44  % of APUG‐supported herder cooperatives involved  in training and advisory services by AFPUGs  0  25  26  Output  3.3.  Herders  are  reached  via  the  PUG  system  with  relevant  and  tested  extension  messages (f/m).  Extension services build the motivation and confidence of herders to apply sustainable practices of  rangeland and livestock management.  % of PUGs with trained herder‐advisors (f/m=30/70)  in total number of PUGs in GG area  0  15  34  % of PUG‐members  (f/m=30/70) engaged in field‐ based  learning,  advisory  services  and  herder‐to‐ herder exchange  0  10  12  % of PUG‐members (f/m=30/70) received extension  messages via printed and audio‐visual media  0  15  30  Output 3.4. Significant number of APUGs have cooperation agreements with AHBUs.  Extension cooperation between APUGs and the government system is institutionalised.  % of APUGs with extension cooperation agreements  with AHBUs  0  25  28 
  12. 12.   11    3.2 Implementation constraints and ways to overcome them  Implementation constraints  Ways to overcome them  Constraints at the central level  Imbalanced relationship between MSUA and NAEC:  MSUA as head organisation of agricultural research  vs.  NAEC  as  a  small  agency  with  no  authority  to  coordinate DIAs and AHBUs   Emphasise dialogue at MOFA‐level for  collaboration between MSUA and NAEC Unsustainable  leadership  and  frequent  staff  turnover at NAEC   Emphasise dialogue at MOFA‐level for  changes  in  the  Government  extension  system  Constraints at the local (aimag‐ and soum‐) level  Uncertainty  of  APUGs  and  AFPUGs  beyond  the  project   Emphasise  strengthening  APUG‐based  cooperatives;   Ensure  strong  involvement  of  the  government partners DIAs and AHBUs  Unsustainable  leadership  at  aimag  and  soum  governments   Emphasise dialogue at MOFA‐level for  changes in the extension system  Staff turnover at APUGs and AHBUs     Ensure  strong  involvement  of  the  government partners DIAs and AHBUs;   Build  capacity  of  Master  trainers  to  train  new  personnel  as  extension  facilitators  Limited  capacity  of  AFPUG  and  APUG  staff  in  agricultural development and extension     Ongoing training in extension contents  and methods;   Utilisation  of  human  resources  of  the  existing government extension system;   Building of further capacity  Limited  expertise  of  experts  at  aimag  and  soum  levels     Strong  involvement  of  central‐level  experts  in  overall  implementation  of  local activities and in innovation pilots  in particular    3.3 Eventual changes to main assumptions  The  geographic  focus  defined  in  section  2.3  of  the  tender  document  of  the  component  was  corrected in consultation with the PCU in 2014. While the tender document defined 126 soums of  5 aimags (Bayan‐Ulgii, Gobi‐Altai, Khovd, Uvs and Zavkhan), Green Gold Phase IV targets Arkhangai  and Bayankhongor aimags as well, and the maximum number of soums eligible for Green Gold  support is 123 at a total of 130 soums in 7 aimags since the soums that the aimag centres located  in are not targeted by Green Gold.  While the component is still adhering to the initial proposal of targeting additional soums in Phase  IV of Green Gold, this needs to be coordinated with the PCU. The PCU, however, reported 92  target  soums  in  2014,  and  indicated  that  92  soums  are  to  be  targeted  again  in  2015.  The  component is currently in correspondence with the PCU to examine the expansion plan of Green  Gold for 2015 and 2016. 
  13. 13.   12    4. Finances and Management  4.1 Percentage of budget spent vs. planned per outcome  Budget as per Financial proposal  Percentage of budget spent  vs. planned per outcome  Outcome 3. Demand‐driven extension service system is set up.  34.1  Outputs 3.1. Framework of the Government Extension Service is  streamlined.  20.4  Output 3.2. Relevant extension messages and services are  elaborated, tested and used  19.5  Output 3.3. Herders are reached via the PUG system with  relevant and tested extension messages (f/m)  53.2  Output 3.4. Significant number of APUGs have cooperation  agreements with AHBUs  ‐    4.2 Comments on budget deviations respectively over/under spending, and outlook  for the rest of the phase  A  budget  variation  request  of  the  component  was  approved  by  SDC  in  January  2015.  Major  deviations include:  • Increase in the inputs of the expat International Team Leader (ITL) and local national  consultants as a result of the discontinuation of the services of the expat Participatory  Research and Extension Specialist;  • Increase in the budget for project management events due to unplanned contributions  to planning workshops organised by the Green Gold PCU;  • Increase in budget for use of mass media and promotional events;  • Increase in budget for exchange seminars/field days due to the strong need for field‐ based training at the PUG level that was identified by the diagnostic study;  • Reduced airfares and travel expenses;  • Reduced allocation for the “Establishment of Herder Service Centres” due to the fact that  herder training and information centres have already been established in some Green  Gold areas during the previous phase of Green Gold; and  • Adjustment (mostly reduction) of costs for training events based on actual expenses in  2014.  The approximate distribution of the budget is 30‐35% in 2013‐2014, 50‐55% in 2015 and 15‐20%  in 2016. The relatively small allocation of the budget for use in 2016 is in line with the Green Gold  policy to restrict interventions in 2016 due to the parliamentary elections to be held in June 2016;  followed by the Citizens’ Representative Khural elections at aimag and soum levels, where Green  Gold interventions can be misused or misinterpreted as election campaigns.  4.3 Appraisal on how efficiently inputs were converted into outputs  Overall budget efficiency: The budget of the component is managed by UQID in line with the  recommendations of SDC to: minimise inputs of international consultants, increase engagement  of domestic experts and maintain a high proportion of administered project funds. Accordingly,  22  percent  of  the  total  budget  is  spent  on  international  expert  inputs  while  the  share  of  administered project funds is near 50 percent. Administrative costs are kept at a substantially low  level through subcontracting arrangements with a local NGO. 
  14. 14.   13    Cost‐efficiency of the pilot intervention: The pilot intervention of the component is informed by  the principle of demonstrating affordable approaches and methods of agricultural extension to  the Government of Mongolia. This principle is effectively put into practice through participatory  processes of designing and implementing field activities and by capitalising on the capacity of  APUGs to provide extension services with a high coverage at minimal costs through the PUG  system. The costs of the herder‐to‐herder learning and exchange strategy piloted in 265 PUGs in  2014, for instance, were in the range of CHF 1 per herder and event.  4.4 Reference to activities and brief explanations if there were major differences  between the executed and the planned activities  There have been no significant differences between the planned and the executed activities to  report.  4.5 Human  Resources  including  Diversity  Management  and  issues  on  the  organisational level that affected the management of the component  Human  resources:  The  HQ  staff  consists  of  two  members  (f,  m)  and  the  PIU  at  the  local  subcontractor Association for Sustainable Rural Development currently employs 2 full‐time staff  (f, m) and 3 part‐time staff (2f, 1m). In addition, two international experts (f, m), including the ITL,  and three national consultants (2f, 1m) are engaged on a regular basis.  Major issues on the organisation level:  • Dr  Ann  Waters‐Bayer,  the  Participatory  Research  and  Extension  Consultant  originally  proposed in the component proposal, was replaced by Dr Kees Swaan with approval by  SDC. Dr Swaans, however, withdrew from the project upon completion of his second  activity report due to personal reasons. This change consequently led to an increase in  inputs of the ITL and local national consultants.  • In May 2014, UniQuest’s International Development (ID) group, which holds the contract  with SDC, was transferred into The University of Queensland, its parent organisation. This  change has not affected the implementation of the Extension Component.  • Delayed start of the component (from September 2013 to late November 2013) resulting  in a rushed start and a limited amount of time to do solid socialisation of the Extension  approach and planning of activities with stakeholders at the soum/aimag level, as well as  with the other Green Gold components.   • Due to a lack of a structured communication and planning mechanisms within the Green  Gold program the component had to respond to several requests for contribution of  human  and  financial  resources  from  the  Applied  Research  Component  that  had  not  initially been included in the annual work plan and budget. These were felt to be not in  line with the approach and structures that the Extension Component was trying to put in  place.  Better  structured  collaborative  planning  is  needed  in  the  future  to  avoid  misunderstandings of what can and cannot be done by each component. 
  15. 15.   14    5. Lessons Learnt  5.1 Good  practice  and  innovations  working  with  key  partners,  beneficiaries,  interagency collaboration, but also obstacles and difficulties  Selected good practices and innovation  Selected obstacles and difficulties  Strengthening the Government extension system   Multi‐stakeholder  platforms  such  as  a  central‐level  Advisory Committee building a solid base for continuous  dialogue  on  improving  the  Government  extension  system;   Creating  ownership  of  project  interventions  by  local  stakeholders  through  a  decentralised  implementation  scheme  for  effectiveness  and  sustainability  of  interventions.   Changing leadership and staff turnover  at local stakeholders e.g. due to change  of government;   Misinterpretation of extension as a top‐ down technology transfer service;   Perception of civil society as a structure  opposing  governments,  leading  to  mistrust between CSOs e.g. APUGs and  local governments.  Building capacities and structures for demand‐driven extension services   Development of specific learning materials on the same  topic  for  different  levels  of  competence  (e.g.  Master  Trainers, Facilitators, Herder advisors);   Institutionalisation  of  extension  services  through  agreements with soum governments.   Limited education of AFPUG and APUG  staff  in  livestock  farming  and  agricultural economics;   Overload  of  AHBU  staff  with  non‐ extension tasks.  Piloting demand‐driven extension services   Use of mass  media, especially television, for maximum  reach of extension messages;   Increasing the usefulness of printed media e.g. newsletter  through locally specific contents;   Field‐based training guided by specialists in combination  with PUG‐level herder‐to‐herder exchange facilitated by  trained herder advisors presenting an effective approach  of informing and motivating herders;   Herder women effectively spreading extension messages  through “exchange at tea” with neighbours and relatives  at no cost.   Large  geographic  distances  of  herders  from soum centres causing high costs of  field‐based training;   Language barrier of Kazakh herders.    5.2 If available, important findings from reviews and self‐evaluations  The Mid‐Term Review of the Green Gold project, while supporting the overall strategy and goals  of the component, specifically questioned the sustainability of innovation pilots that were carried  out by PUGs with project support as herder learning activities in 2014, and suggested shifting the  focus  of  such  pilots  to  “bringing  the  production  to  useful  scale”.  In  response  to  this  recommendation and SDC’s supporting statement that followed the MTR report, the component  will  carefully  design  demand‐based  innovation  pilots  that  are  technically  and  economically  feasible, with substantial financial involvement of local stakeholders and adequate scale. This will  result in tangible benefits for herders implementing the pilots while simultaneously serving as  effective field learning sites in 2015.  A  further  MTR  recommendation  addressed  the  need  to  train  non‐state  actors  for  fee‐based  service delivery to ensure sustainability. This recommendation is in line with our focus on APUG‐ based herder cooperatives as potential providers of user‐financed extension services. 

×