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Citizens Bank Business Insiders: Granite State Future

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The presentation from the Citizens Bank Business Insiders Breakfast Series on December 19, 2013.

Featuring presenters:

Alderman Mike Tabacsko, Chairman of the Board of Directors of Nashua Regional Planning Commission

Jennifer Czysz, Senior Regional Planner with Nashua Regional Planning Commission,
Program Manager of Granite State Future Project

Kerrie Diers
Executive Director of the Nashua Regional Planning Commission

Christopher Clement
Commissioner of the New Hampshire Department of Transportation

Published in: Business, Technology
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Citizens Bank Business Insiders: Granite State Future

  1. 1. Business Insiders Breakfast Granite State Future Project December 19, 2013
  2. 2. Today‘s Panelists Mike Tabacsko Alderman, Board of Directors of Nashua Regional Planning Commission Jennifer Czysz Kerrie Diers Christopher Clement Senior Regional Planner with Nashua Regional Planning Commission, Program Manager of Granite State Future Project Executive Director of the Nashua Regional Planning Commission Commissioner of the New Hampshire Department of Transportation Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce 2
  3. 3. Mike Tabacsko REGIONAL PLANNING FROM A LOCAL PERSPECTIVE Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce 3
  4. 4. Planning for Quality of Life Nashua’s Ongoing Projects: • Branding Initiative • Commuter Rail • Broad Street Parkway Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce 4
  5. 5. Linking Planning Efforts State Development Plan RSA 9-A Regional Planning RSA 36:47 Local Master Plan RSA 674:2 Regional Coordination: • Local Perspective • Quality of Life • A Mutual Relationship Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce 5
  6. 6. Our Regional Advantage Relative proximity to: • Jobs • Mountains • Ocean • Amenities Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce 6
  7. 7. Jennifer Czysz & Kerrie Diers GRANITE STATE FUTURE PROJECT Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce 7
  8. 8. Building a Comprehensive Regional Plan 8
  9. 9. Who We Are
  10. 10. What We Do • Regional Plan • Metropolitan Planning Organization o Capitol Corridor Commuter Rail Project o Highway, transit, bicycle/pedestrian projects • Regional Housing Needs Assessment • Assist Municipalities with transportation, land use, mapping and environmental planning projects
  11. 11. Who We Are: Population
  12. 12. Who We Are: Population The Nashua Region closely tracks the State‘s median age
  13. 13. Who We Are: Population For the first time in nearly 100 years, the 2010 Census showed a lower percent growth in the Nashua Region than in Hillsborough County or the State. Regional population over the last decade has become flat at less than 0.5% growth between 2000 and 2010.
  14. 14. Who We Are: Households Traditional Households (HH’s) are on the decline Persons Living Alone (23% of total HH‘s) Non-Family Households (30% of total HH‘s) Family Households Married Couple Families (56% of total HH‘s) Families with Children Under Age 18 (33% of total HH‘s) Married Couples with Own Children under 18 (25% of total HH‘s)
  15. 15. Who We Are: Human Capital Our kids are wicked smaht. Second highest average SAT scores after Washington State (Source: The College Board, 2010, 2011)
  16. 16. Who We Are: Purchase Power We have high incomes. Top 8 percentile (Source: Department of Housing and Urban Development, 2012)
  17. 17. Who We Are: Transportation We like our cars. 83.3% of Nashua Region residents commute alone by car. (Source: American Community Survey – 5 year estimates).
  18. 18. Who We Are: Transportation Or do we.... Need for more transportation options consistently noted by residents (Source: Granite State Future Public Outreach results)
  19. 19. Who We Are: Commuting 1 in 4 Residents of the Nashua region commute into Massachusetts
  20. 20. Who We Are: Marketers View Most Common Profiles in the Nashua Region Country Squires Big Fish, Small Pond Wealthy, exurban Baby Boomers with children who live on sprawling properties and enjoy club sports. Older, upscale professionals, live in small towns, belong to country clubs, shop at Talbots, and enjoy water sports. • Order from Amazon.com • Watch ‗The Biggest Loser‘ • Vacation at ski resorts. • Kiplinger‘s Personal Finance • No kids • Watch the Kentucky Derby • Toyota drivers (Source: The Neilsen Co.) Greenbelt Sports Upscale, exurban older couples without children who enjoy outdoor lifestyle, shop at eBay.com and vacation in the Tropics. Likely to be college educated and own new homes. • Watch ‗That 70s Show‘ • Heavy readers • Nissan drivers Home Sweet Home Scattered across the nation‘s suburbs, the adults in the segment, mostly under 55, have gone to college and hold professional and white-collar jobs. • Watch the ‗Amazing Race‘ • Download music • Online shoppers Gearing Up Mostly twentysomething singles signing their first telecommunications agreements. • Low incomes • Smartphones are a necessity • Heavy social networkers • Streaming content over cable service
  21. 21. What We‘ve Heard: Transportation ―walkable developments‖ ―better connected sidewalks‖ ―balance investments‖ ―better east-west travel options‖ ―more bicycle lanes‖ ―commuter rail to Boston‖ ―better regional cooperation‖
  22. 22. What We‘ve Heard: Housing ―factor transportation into housing costs‖ ―more compact housing units‖ ―better east-west travel options‖ ―ensure zoning and land use codes support affordable housing‖ ―more bicycle lanes‖ ―more housing near downtowns‖ ―commuter rail to Boston‖ ―more housing for those in creative fields‖ ―greener ―better housing regional options:‖ cooperation‖
  23. 23. What We‘ve Heard: Vitality ―walkable developments‖ ―embrace development along waterways‖ ―a regional start-up incubator‖ ―commuter rail to Boston‖ ―redevelop parking lots into ‗vertical‘ development‖ ―more mixed-use ―more bicycle lanes‖ development‖ ―more pocket parks downtown‖
  24. 24. What We‘ve Heard: Environment
  25. 25. What Do You Think? • What do you feel are the most important areas to focus on? • Where should resources such as funding and time be invested? Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce 25
  26. 26. Christopher Clement NEW HAMPSHIRE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce 26
  27. 27. The Roads to New Hampshire‘s Future
  28. 28. Presentation Overview • New Hampshire DOT – Mission – Department Overview – Modes of Transportation – Turnpike System – Funding Sources • MAP-21 Federal Program – Performance Management – Asset Management • Funding Concerns
  29. 29. Mission Transportation excellence enhancing the quality of life in New Hampshire
  30. 30. Key Facts About DOT 1,605 permanent employees (FY14) – 22% steady decrease since 1992 Responsible for: • 2,143 State Bridges • State Red List – 145 (8%) • State Near Red List – 261 • 1,685 Municipal Bridges • Municipal Red List – 353 (21%) • All bridges are inspected at least once every two years • State red list bridges are inspected twice every year • Municipal red list bridges are inspected once every year • 4,559 centerline miles of roadway maintained (additional 290 town maintained) • 8,868 lane-miles of roadway maintained • Annual paving totals 200-300 miles per year (40,000 tons asphalt) • Maintain 100,000 highway signs
  31. 31. 47 Other Transportation Modes Aeronautics Rail Public Transit
  32. 32. 48 Aeronautics NH Aviation Facts: • 1,280 Registered Aircraft •117 Registered Airports - 24 Public Use Airports (11 receive federal funding) • Airport Improvement Program • $ 9 m (FFY 13) - Block Grant (10 of 12) airports • $ 5m for Manchester and Lebanon (direct to airports) • $1m (CY 2012) - Total revenue (state funds) - Aircraft registrations - 75% to General Fund, 25% to airports
  33. 33. 49 Public Transit Scheduled Services 11 public transit systems Intercity/Commuter bus service •Boston Express •Concord Coach •C & J •Greyhound Approx. $13.5m – Total Federal Funds for NH (FY 2013)
  34. 34. Rail 450 miles of active railroad in NH • 253 miles state-owned 9 Freight Railroads Passenger Rail Service in New Hampshire • Amtrak Downeaster • The Vermonter • Proposed Capitol Corridor Special Railroad Fund (Average $600,000 a year) • Used for purchasing, operating & maintaining railroad properties
  35. 35. NH Capitol Corridor Study NH Capitol Corridor Study
  36. 36. Scope Outline • Evaluate Existing Conditions: i. ii. • Develop Alternatives Including Routes, Stations and Schedules: i. ii. iii. iv. • Commuter Rail Options from Lowell to Nashua, Manchester, and Concord Bus Options including bus on shoulder and connections to rail Intercity rail options from Boston to Concord No Build Define and Evaluate Alternatives: i. ii. • Public and stakeholder involvement Purpose & Need Statement Preliminary screening Evaluation of Alternatives Based On: • Ridership • Costs: capital, operating • Environmental impacts (EA) • Transit-supportive land use, economic development • Demographics Project Completion
  37. 37. Study Schedule Spring/Summer 2013 Fall 2013 Spring/Summer 2014 Late Fall 2014 • Evaluate Existing Conditions • Develop Alternatives • Define and Evaluate Alternatives • Project Completion
  38. 38. 2015 - 2024 Ten Year Transportation Plan Governors Advisory Commission on Intermodal Transportation (GACIT)
  39. 39. GACIT Process i. DRAFT Plan, Financially Constrained • Work in progress ii. Public Hearing Input • Regional priorities and needs iii. GACIT Recommendation to Governor – December 2013 iv. Governor Recommendation to Legislature – January 2014 v. Legislative approval – June 2014
  40. 40. I-93 Funding NH‘s #1 Priority No Current Financing Plan • $250 M Unfunded Remaining Needs Not in Ten Year Plan – Capacity Improvements Exit 3 NB to I-293 split (excl. Exit 5) • Financial plan delivered to FHWA – remaining I-93 project in jeopardy without statement of legislative intent to fully fund project • Environmental Permits lapse in 2020 • Exit 4A – not funded • Continuing Negative Impact on Ten Year Plan – 2030
  41. 41. Turnpike System Overview • • • • • 3 Turnpike Segments 89 Miles Long 170 Bridges 10 Toll Facilities Enterprise Fund – All Turnpike revenue must be used on the System • Turnpike Revenue pays for: – Operating & Maintenance Costs – Debt Service – R&R Work – Capital Improvements • FY12 $108.7M transactions and $116.6M toll revenue 1
  42. 42. Proposed Turnpike Expanded Capital Program Unfunded Projects in Current Capital Program form HB 391 – Session 2009 Authorization: • Bedford ORT - $18M (FY15 Adv) • Dover End of N-D Project - $80M (FY14 Adv) Proposed Expanded Capital Program • Bow-Concord: I-93 Widening (I-89 to I-393) - $195M (FY18 Adv) • Nashua-Bedford: FEET Widening (Exit 8 to I-293) - $70M (FY17 Adv) • Manchester: Reconstruction of Exit 6 & FEET Widening - $88M (FY17 Adv) • Manchester: New Interchange at Exit 7 - $54M (FY 18 Adv) • Spaulding Turnpike Toll Facilities (ORT or AET) - $15M (FY16 Adv) • Spaulding Turnpike Maintenance Facilities - $8M (FY14 Adv) • Turnpike Administration Building - $7M (FY15 Adv) • Nashua-Bedford ITS Infrastructure - $4M (FY15 Adv) • Merrimack Exit 12 Toll Plaza Removal - $2M (FY15 Adv) • Sarah Mildred Long Bridge ($2M Annual Capital Contribution) - $18M (FY14 Start) • TYP 2013-2022 includes PE & ROW for BowConcord ($13.0M) and for Manchester Exit 6 & 7 ($14.0M) *Reference: Transportation Infrastructure Report 2011 – Building America’s Future: Falling Apart & Falling Behind Potential to create 14,000 jobs* over a ten year period
  43. 43. Hooksett Rest Areas Re-Development 35-Yr Ground Lease Contract 16,000 sf Welcome Centers 20,000 sf Liquor Stores Mill Building Architectural Style       1950‘s Style Diner Old-Time Deli Italian Farmhouse Restaurant Coffee & Breakfast Shop Country-style Convenience Store Interactive Visitor Information Center 16 Fuel Stations for Passenger Vehicles Ample Rest Rooms Ample Parking   355 NB Total Parking (240 cars, 11 buses/trucks, 35 local, 69 overflow) 291 SB Total Parking (255 cars, 15 buses/trucks, 21 local)
  44. 44. 50 FUNDING OUTLOOK
  45. 45. 54 Challenges Ahead • Federal Reauthorization MAP-21 expires September 2014 • Shrinking revenue from fuel efficient vehicles and less miles traveled due to recession • One-time solutions–Not Sustainable Funding • Rising Costs - Petroleum based business
  46. 46. Increased Fuel Efficiency = Less HWY Revenue
  47. 47. DOT FUNDING SOURCES • Highway Fund (road toll tax a.k.a. gas tax, motor vehicle fees, court fees, misc.) $260 m/ year) • -$48 m deficit FY16, -$105 m FY17 Operating Budget • Federal Aid ($143 m/year) – Capital Budget • General Funds: Aeronautics, Rail, Transit ($900,000/year) • Turnpike Fund: Turnpikes only (subject to to bondholders): $117m/year tolls covenants
  48. 48. MAP 21: A New Era
  49. 49. MAP 21: A New Era • MAP-21 initiates a new era for U.S. transportation agencies focusing on: i. Performance management – Balanced Score Card ii. Asset management – 100% FHWA funded gap analysis iii. Risk management • States must develop risk-based, performance-based asset management plans for at least the NHS – focus on maintenance & preservation
  50. 50. MAP-21 Performance Declaration • Performance management will transform the Federal-aid highway program • Provide a means to the most efficient investment of Federal transportation funds • Focus on national transportation goals • Increase accountability and transparency of the Federal-aid highway program • Improve decision making through performance based planning and programming
  51. 51. Asset Management Definition • Asset management is a strategic and systematic process of operating, maintaining, and improving physical assets • To identify a structured sequence of maintenance, preservation, repair, rehabilitation, and replacement actions • That will achieve and sustain a desired state of good repair over the lifecycle of the assets at minimum practicable cost
  52. 52. Economic Impact of Maintenance • 40% expenditures Highway Maintenance are expended solely for Snow & Ice control yearly $32-$42 million/year • Studies have shown that if a state was to ―shut down‖ due to a Snow and & Ice event, economic impacts could be between $64 million (UT) and $700 million (NY) DAILY. Massachusetts had an estimated daily loss of $265 million (2011 American Highway Users Alliance study)
  53. 53. The Need to Measure Carefully • The old saying is, ‗you cant fix what you cant measure‘ • It all depends on how you chose and use
  54. 54. Utah DOT Investment Backlog • This ―NH‖ type BSC measure provides the ―future‖ direction of DOT • Tells the public the rural highway (blue) are headed for worse condition • Shows consequence of ―current budget conditions‖ that DOT does NOT have the power to change
  55. 55. Declining Asset Values • • • Decreased asset value due to lack of investment Will the public allow ―their‖ transportation system to decline $ and change current policy makers decisions ―The data will set you free‖
  56. 56. Prioritizing Resources NH Road System (4,559 mi) 1. 2. 3. National Highway System (NHS)(790 mi-18%) • Turnpikes • Interstates • Select US Routes • Select State Numbered Routes US Routes and State Numbered Routes (2,799 mi – 61%) Unnumbered State Roads (970 mi-21%)
  57. 57. New Hampshire Pavement Conditions: 1996-2016 ADDITIONAL $12M PER YEAR NEEDED 1. Influenced by additional ARRA funding 2. 2004 data is not included due to known problems with the data collection vehicle.
  58. 58. Average Price of Asphalt Cement 1992 to 2012  The cost of asphalt cement increased 460% over this period  Diesel, gasoline, road salt increases…..
  59. 59. Statewide Pavement Condition (4,559 total centerline miles 299 unrated)       19 % good condition - 828 miles 44 % fair condition - 1,867 miles 37 % poor condition - 1,565 miles $615 million would be needed to bring all poor condition pavements to good condition (not including drainage, guard rail & bridges) $3.7 billion is the estimated total value of the state-owned pavements Pavements are the State‘s most valuable asset other than land and bridges
  60. 60. 4,559 Miles The DOT Maintained road network would stretch from Concord, NH to Anchorage, AK Anchorage, AK A VERY LONG DRIVE! Concord, NH
  61. 61. Poor Road Conditions Lake Watson, Yukon Anchorage, AK Concord, NH Fargo, ND Would your car survive? 4
  62. 62. Pavement Conditions 2000 2010 Red = Poor Condition
  63. 63. Pavement Preservation  Routine surface treatment and wearing surface renewal (perpetual pavement)  Most cost effective way to maintain pavements  Need to apply treatment before distress starts to show  Will free up resources to invest in lower volume roads  “Keep Good Roads Good”
  64. 64. NH Bridge Condition Red List – Bridges where one or more major structural element is rated as poor condition or worse, or require weight limit posting. Near Red List – Bridges where one or more major structural element is rated as fair condition. Good – Bridges where no major structural element is rated as fair or poor.
  65. 65. New Hampshire Red List Bridges  Total Number of State owned bridges in 2011 = 2,143
  66. 66. State Owned Bridges Added and Removed from the Red List  Additional Investment of $15m per year would repair as many as 10 bridges depending on size and conditions
  67. 67. 2013 Red List Bridges 145 State Owned Bridges 353 Municipal & Other Owned Bridges
  68. 68. 2012: 11 Municipal Bridges Closed
  69. 69. Status and Estimated Costs – State Red List • Ten Year Plan rehab/replace 98 of the 140 State Red List bridges. • $680 M (2012 dollars) to rehabilitate or replace the current State Red List bridges. • 100 State bridges were replaced last 10 yrs. • Current 10-Year Plan, 98 State bridges to be replaced =10/yr. • +200 years to replace all 2,143 State bridges. • $7.82 Billion is the estimated total value of the state-owned bridges
  70. 70. NHDOT Positions VS DVMT & Lane Miles 30000 1950 25000 # of Positions 1900 20000 1850 1800 15000 1750 10000 1700 5000 1650 20 12 20 10 20 08 20 06 20 04 20 02 20 00 19 98 19 96 0 19 94 19 92 1600 Years 57% of Staff eligible for retirement in next 5 years Daily Vehicle Miles Travel (DVMT) & Lane Miles 2000 VMT 29% increase 11% increase lane miles 20% less # positions # of Positions Lane Miles DVMT Linear (DVMT)
  71. 71. One-time Non-Sustainable Operating Funding • FY 06-07 Surplus from Highway Fund • FY 08-09 Bonding $60m • FY 10-11 Registration Surcharge $90m I-95 Transfer $50m • FY 12-13 I-95 Transfer $52m • FY 14 -15 I-95 Transfer $ 30m • FY 16 -17 Deficit -$48m & - $105m
  72. 72. In light of the recent Global Competitiveness Report rankings from the World Economic Forum on infrastructure quality which has listed the United States at 25th place—down from 9th place in 2009—such a major disruption to federal transportation investment will produce serious losses that threaten the gradual macroeconomic recovery seen in the last few years.
  73. 73. The Roads to New Hampshire‘s Future
  74. 74. Thank you for coming December 19, 2013
  75. 75. Upcoming Events TONIGHT: iUGO‘s Festivus January 6: Legislative Symposium & Reception January 8: Business After Hours at Massage Envy ~ Nashua HAPPY HOLIDAYS! Register today at www.NashuaChamber.com Greater Nashua Chamber of Commerce

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