3 tips for conducting great employment interviews

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A well-run interview won’t just reduce the risk of a bad hire, it can also reduce the complexity and number of hires needed in the future. Unfortunately, too many companies treat interviewing like an art and assume that their employees naturally know how to interview. Conducting efficient, productive interviews is a science and just reviewing a resume prior to an interview isn’t enough.

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3 tips for conducting great employment interviews

  1. 1. 3 Tips for Conducting Great Employment Interviews <br />lefttopType the phrase “interview tips” into Google and there are plenty of sites that offer interviewing advice for job seekers.  But what about tips for conducting interviews? There aren’t nearly as many resources. Is it because everyone who works at a company is born a good interviewer?  Clearly not.<br />A well-run interview won’t just reduce the risk of a bad hire, it can also reduce the complexity and number of hires needed in the future. Unfortunately, too many companies treat interviewing like an art and assume that their employees naturally know how to interview. Conducting efficient, productive interviews is a science and just reviewing a resume prior to an interview isn’t enough.<br />Having been technical recruiters for over a decade, we’ve seen just about every type of interview process and every mistake too.  As a part of our Gravity On-Demand offering, a contract recruiting solution for growing technology companies, we offer interview training for both hiring managers and individual interviewers. Led by our recruiting industry experts, the training sessions are interactive and scenario driven and are delivered most effectively in small groups so individuals aren’t intimidated to ask questions.<br />To give you an idea of some of the takeaways from a typical interview training session, we’ve put together a quick list of tips that interviewers can start using today.  For more information about our interview training programs, contact our VP of Services, Jonathan Chenard.<br />1. Don’t wing it: Have a purpose<br />Before even reviewing applicants, it’s imperative to crystallize the requirements for the role and why. Without this understanding, your interview is like hiking a new trail without a map. Your feet may be moving but it’s unclear where you are heading. Once you've identified your purpose - the information you have to conduct the interview will provide a framework to ask meaningful, relevant questions. Why are we hiring this person and do they have what it takes to be successful from day one?<br />2. Interviews are bi-directional: Question and ANSWER<br />Every interview follows 2 agendas - yours and your applicant's. Just as you come into the interview with a set of questions and goals, so, too, does the candidate you're interviewing. He or she is interviewing at your company a reason; there is something specific he or she wants. Always leave time to allow applicants to ask you questions about the job and the company.  And, always be prepared to explain why you enjoy your job (there must be something).  In the end, the more information a candidate gleans during the interview process, the fewer risks they have when making a decision to join your company.<br />3. Avoid “Analysis Paralysis”: Collect your thoughts immediately<br />It's not enough to take notes during an interview. It's critical that you also collect your thoughts as soon as an interview is over. What was your first impression? Would you hire this person if it were completely up to you? Good interviewers are not afraid to have an opinion and time will only allow your convictions to fade.  Take a well formulated opinion to your next debriefing session and avoid painful, time- consuming “analysis paralysis”.<br />

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