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3 Critical Steps to Project Management Office (PMO) Development

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Implementers know that before you make final decisions, you examine the current state and optimize it whenever possible before overlaying new process or new technology. Launching a PMO is no different. This presentation covers three important steps to position and balance your organization during PMO implementation.

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3 Critical Steps to Project Management Office (PMO) Development

  1. 1. 3Critical Steps to Position & Balance your Organization When developing project management offices (PMO) BeyondPMO Project Management Office Consulting
  2. 2. A PMO or even an Enterprise PMO (EPMO) doesn’t empower an organization to deliver on strategic initiatives. It is the other way around. The organization and its culture enables the PMO to get stuff done. The term “Project Management” isn’t a new concept, but it isn’t necessarily understood either. It’s a construct woven into the complex fabric of organizational growth. Its definition and how it is implemented evolves with, and melds uniquely into the organization that embraces it. Implementers know that before you make final decisions, you examine the current state and optimize it whenever possible before overlaying new process or new technology. Launching a PMO is no different. Its precursors are rooted in close examination of leadership strengths and knowledge as well as cultural fit. There is a lot to consider, but this presentation covers three important steps to position and balance your organization during PMO implementation lest your organization go by way of the common question, “Why is my PMO not performing?”
  3. 3. They are…..
  4. 4. They are….. Educate
  5. 5. They are….. Educate Build Structure
  6. 6. They are….. Educate Build Structure Be Introspective
  7. 7. 1. Teach principles, methods, and practices
  8. 8. Most departments are clearly understood. There is no question about Payroll, Finance, Human Resources, or Operations. American business embraced these concepts long ago in the normal course of operation. Departments like Human Resources are well understood because of their specific purpose. They operate somewhat autonomously. Finance doesn’t need to be efficient for Human Resources to do its job and vice versa. This rings true for most departments in a hierarchical environment. Why is Project Management different?
  9. 9. Project Management is unique because it is often unstructured, not understood, and almost never autonomous. Project Management persists in many organizations as a disconnected, undefined concept. In small organizations, project managers (let alone project management structure) may not exist at all. Also, the project/program manager role is realized differently depending on the area under which these professionals report even if the company has a standard description. It becomes an over-used title issued in the absence of a better one. For departments like Operations the purpose of project management may not be understood because the concept has never been socialized or taught. Methodology and bureaucracy in large organizations can be complex, inconsistent, or unclear.
  10. 10. Project Management can never be the same as Finance or Human Resources because it’s fundamentals are woven into the organization as an intangible mechanism. It is all three working in tandem that enables coordinated, cross-functional forward movement. It is partly built on execution principles and methodologies, but at its core are organizational PRACTICES.
  11. 11. So…….what do you want me to teach them? Project Management can never be the same as Finance or Human Resources because it’s fundamentals are woven into the organization as an intangible mechanism. It is all three working in tandem that enables coordinated, cross-functional forward movement. It is partly built on execution principles and methodologies, but at its core are organizational PRACTICES.
  12. 12. Teach ALL professionals: PM principles Clearly defined methodologies Clearly defined Project Management PRACTICES
  13. 13. Principles and methodologies are skill-based while practices are cultural. Sound practices create an environment that is ready to receive a structure that may include a PMO. Educating all managers and leaders in all three disciplines helps the PMO or EPMO reach its intended mission by operating in an enlightened, cooperative environment. This level of education creates a camaraderie of understanding. Principles – scope, time, cost management etc. Methodology – step 1,2,3 Practices – organizing, team formation, roles, authority, expectations
  14. 14. Project Management is a construct. It is built by design but evolves with the organization. Its evolution is manifest in the skills and strengths of the organization’s leaders. Leadership must weave all three project management concepts into the framework of management and leadership education. Leaders that embrace and teach project management concepts and enable the propagation of those concepts create an open, balanced environment where PMOs and the cross-functional departments for which they serve can better connect.
  15. 15. What else should you do before you implement a PMO? Project Management is a construct. It is built by design but evolves with the organization. Its evolution is manifest in the skills and strengths of the organization’s leaders. Leadership must weave all three project management concepts into the framework of management and leadership education. Leaders that embrace and teach project management concepts and enable the propagation of those concepts create an open, balanced environment where PMOs and the cross-functional departments for which they serve can better connect.
  16. 16. 2. Build structure and enable proactive and reactive communication to merge the individual parts of an organization into a cohesive whole
  17. 17. Build physical connection mechanisms to: Detect overlaps (Is that activity over there related to what we are trying to accomplish?) Identify gaps (Have we thought of everything? Should we analyze?) Build awareness (Are we sure we’re on the same page?) Foster transparency (Who’s accountable for this? What are the real benefits?)
  18. 18. Build retrievable artifacts & make sure people use them “Those unable to catalogue the past are doomed to repeat it.” Daniel Handler
  19. 19. Build retrievable artifacts & make sure people use them “Those unable to catalogue the past are doomed to repeat it.” Daniel Handler What else is there to think about?
  20. 20. GO AFTER IT! Everyone at every level has creative ideas & constructive feedback
  21. 21. Conducting lessons learned is useless if there are no learned lessons If there are actionable lessons (both good and bad), your organization’s practices, principles, and methods should always be in flux And that’s a good thing!
  22. 22. 3. Be introspective; ask and answer important questions as you contemplate a PMO
  23. 23. What are our current execution practices? Do we have any? How do we get stuff done? How do we form teams? What about roles? Accountability vs. Responsibility? Transparency? What’s a project manager in this organization?
  24. 24. Do we really have a clearly defined plan that spans a number of years?
  25. 25. Do we know the strengths and limitations of our leadership? Do we hold them accountable?
  26. 26. What is our project management maturity? Structured? Unstructured? Process? No process?
  27. 27. What do we want it to be? What is our project management maturity? Structured? Unstructured? Process? No process?
  28. 28. What is the current culture of our organization? What’s defined by the environment and what’s defined by leadership?
  29. 29. Are we too bureaucratic? The size of a company, Its funding processes, the criteria it uses to make decisions, its IT processes, and other bureaucratic details sometimes create conflicts that lead to timing issues. Timing issues lead to quality issues. Quality issues lead to execution failure and bottom line impact.
  30. 30. What do your managers know about project management? When you give a directive to get something done, does it happen?
  31. 31. A PMO or even an Enterprise PMO doesn’t empower an organization to deliver on strategic initiatives. It is the other way around Project Management is unique because it isn’t autonomous and is often unstructured It is partly built on project/program execution principles and methodologies, but at its core are organizational PRACTICES Teach all professionals sound principles, methodologies, and Practices Incorporate them into your culture Build structure that enables proactive and reactive communication to merge the individual parts of an organization into a cohesive whole And remember to ask and answer key questions along the way So let me just reiterate,
  32. 32. Thank you for your time. If you like this presentation I’d be happy to give it to your leadership team. Read the full article on my webpage at BeyondPMO.com. Best wishes to you and your organization!! http://www.beyondpmo.com/Portfolio Let me know if I can help Susan Graves, BeyondPMO susan@beyondpmo.com 858-414-5465 www.linkedin.com/in/gravessusan http://www.beyondpmo.comBeyondPMO Project Management Office Consulting

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