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Grape go p june15mtg

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Grape go p june15mtg

  1. 1. Grape GoPContent Creation Committee<br />June 15th 2010<br />
  2. 2. Committee Members<br />Keith Striegler, Leader<br />Bruce Bordelon<br />Damon Smith<br />Ed Hellman<br />Eric Stafne<br />Jim Wolpert<br />Lorraine Berkett<br />Mark Chien<br />Patty Skinkis<br />Rhoda Burrows<br />
  3. 3. Agenda<br />1) Call to Order & Welcome Keith Striegler, Committee Leader<br />2) Overview of Grape CoP, <br /> Responsibilities & Progress Eric T. Stafne, PI<br />3) Discussion Items:<br /> <br />a) Review of Content Categories<br />b) Writing for the Web Lane Greer<br />Web Writing Tips<br />Sample Articles<br />Process: Submission to publication<br />c) Assignments & Deadlines<br />4) Future Committee Meetings<br />5) Questions/Comments<br />6) Adjourn<br />
  4. 4. Welcome & Call to Order<br />Dr. Keith Striegler, University of Missouri<br />
  5. 5. Overview of Grape CoP<br />Responsibilities and progress<br />Dr. Eric Stafne, Principle Investigator, Oklahoma State University<br />
  6. 6. Discussion Items<br />Content Subcategories<br />Broad topics that need multiple articles.<br />The content subcategories provide the framework for the topics that will need to have article submissions.<br />
  7. 7. Content Subcategories<br /><ul><li>Disease Management
  8. 8. Insect Management
  9. 9. Vertebrate Pest Management
  10. 10. Weed and Floor Management
  11. 11. Vine Nutrition and Fertilization
  12. 12. Irrigation and Water Management
  13. 13. Maturity Monitoring and Harvest </li></ul>Vineyard Site Selection <br />Grape Varieties <br />Rootstocks <br />Trellis and Training Systems <br />Economics and Business Management <br />General Vineyard Management <br />Training Young Vines <br />Pruning <br />Canopy Management <br />
  14. 14. Writing for the Web<br />The task is much easier than it may appear!<br />You will simply be “re-packaging” what you know and what you have no doubt written about many times.<br />Most submissions need only be a few paragraphs and one or two photos.<br />
  15. 15. Sample Submission<br />Vineyard Site Selection: Slope<br />In selecting a site for a vineyard, the slope of the land is an important consideration. Slope describes the steepness or incline of the land and it is usually expressed as a percentage. Land that is perfectly flat would have a slope of 0% and land that had a 10ft fall over a 100ft distance would be said to have a slope of 10%.<br />A slight to moderate slope is beneficial for grape growing because it facilitates the drainage of cold air away from the vineyard. Cold air is dense and like water, it will flow downhill and away from the vineyard provided there is no barrier the air movement. This downhill movement is very important in areas that are subject to spring frost and winter cold injury. Good water drainage is also important for grape vines and sloping land helps to facilitate surface drainage and to a lesser extent, internal drainage.<br />Too much slope can be problematic for a vineyard. As the percent of slope or degree of incline increases, the risk of soil erosion also increases. Erosion reduces soil fertility in the vineyard and increases the concerns of water quality and run-off. In addition, slopes nearing or over 10% pose a problem in operating equipment. Slopes of 15% or more pose a dangerous risk in equipment roll-over.<br />For more information on vineyard slope and site selection, see –<br />Vineyard Site Assessment – Texas Cooperative Extension<br />Vineyard Site Selection – University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service<br />Vineyard Site Selection – North Carolina State University<br />
  16. 16. On the Web<br />Vineyard Site Selection: Slope<br />In selecting a site for a vineyard, the slope of the land is an important consideration.Slope describes the steepness or incline of the land and it is usually expressed as a percentage. Land that is perfectly flat would have a slope of 0% and land that had a 10ft fall over a 100ft distance would be said to have a slope of 10%.<br />A slight to moderate slope is beneficial for grape growing because it facilitates the drainage of cold air away from the vineyard.Cold air is dense and like water, it will flow downhill and away from the vineyard provided there is no barrier the air movement. This downhill movement is very important in areas that are subject to spring frost and winter cold injury. Good water drainage is also important for grape vines and sloping land helps to facilitate surface drainage and to a lesser extent, internal <br />Too much slope can be problematic for a vineyard. As the percent of slope or degree of incline increases, the risk of soil erosion also increases. Erosion reduces soil fertility in the vineyard and increases the concerns of water quality and run-off. In addition, slopes nearing or over 10% pose a problem in operating equipment. Slopes of 15% or more pose a dangerous risk in equipment roll-over.<br />For more information on vineyard slope and site selection, see –<br />Vineyard Site Assessment – Texas Cooperative Extension<br />Vineyard Site Selection – University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service<br />Vineyard Site Selection – North Carolina State University<br />
  17. 17. Anthracnose<br />Example submission in plain text –<br />Anthracnose<br />Anthracnose is caused by a fungus (Elsinoëampelina). The disease is of European origin, therefore anthracnose is generally worse on American-type bunch grapes.  Anthracnose can be severe in years with heavy rainfall, when conditions are warm.  The disease is sporadic in its occurrence, but once established in a vineyard, it can be a persistent problem in subsequent years.<br /> The fungus overwinters as survival structures (sclerotia) found on old, infected plant material.  In the spring when conditions are predominately wet (24 hours or more of wetness), sclerotia will germinate to form mycelium that produces spores (conidia).  A fruiting structure (ascocarp) can also be produced from the sclerotia which will also produce another type of spore (ascospore). Regardless of the type of spore, once transported to susceptible tissue (via wind), temperatures between 35 F and 90 F are suitable for infection.  However, optimal conditions for disease development are 75 F to <br />79 F.  Once the fungus has parasitized the host, it can also produce fruiting bodies (acervuli) which produce pinkish, slimy masses of spores when conditions are wet.  The spores can be splashed to adjacent plant tissue and cause new infections.<br /> Anthracnose is most common on young shoots and fruit, but can be observed on any succulent plant material.  Lesions on shoots and leaves are often sunken, and can take on a reddish appearance, especially near the margins (Figure 18-1, page 106).  On leaves, the centers of the lesions can fall out, producing a “shot-hole” appearance.  Leaves can curl and distort if veins are infected by the fungus.  On fruit, lesions will also be sunken and appear more reddish-black in color (Figure 18-2, page 106).  As the lesions enlarge (up to 1/4-inch) the center will become increasingly sunken and turn gray in color. Fruit may also crack as the lesions expand, exposing the seed. <br /> Cultural Management Options. Because the primary source of spores for new infections results from structures formed in old plant tissue, sanitation is extremely important.  Proper dormant pruning and destruction of canes, clusters, and other plant parts can significantly reduce the amount of primary inoculum (spores).  Also, canopy management during the season can help to increase airflow, which reduces leaf wetness duration (primary component for infection).  Practices such as shoot positioning and strategic leaf pruning can reduce drying time.<br /> Chemical Management Options. In areas with a history of the disease, applying lime sulfur sprays during the dormant season is advised. This application of fungicide helps to further reduce the amount of primary inoculum. Subsequent fungicide sprays every ten to 14 days from bud break until veraison may be necessary where anthracnose is severe.  Check with your county Extension office for a list of fungicides effective for controlling anthracnose. <br />
  18. 18. Article on the Wiki<br />Anthracnose article edited and simplified to be more web-friendly – see link<br />Article on Anthracnose<br />
  19. 19. Tips for Writing for the Web<br />“The Web is the land of <br />attention deficit syndrome.”<br /> - Gerry McGovern<br />
  20. 20. 1) Forget Academic Detail & Formality<br />Journals, newspapers and magazines are often read at an intentional time and in a relaxed setting. The web is very different. Research has shown on the average web page users have time to read at most 28% of the words during an average visit; 20% is more likely. <br />To effectively convey your message, you must be brief and get to the point quickly.<br />
  21. 21. 2) Use A Casual Writing Style<br />Because the web emphasizes a personal experience controlled by the user, web readers generally prefer a friendly, conversational tone.<br />
  22. 22. 3) Make it Concise & “Skim-able”<br />The web user is solution hunting. <br />Scanning text is an extremely common behavior, even for higher-literacy users. <br />Provide key points of information, a small amount of supporting detail and links for more in depth information.<br />
  23. 23. There’s more to the story!<br />After articles are submitted there is still a lot of work to be done to get them “web-ready.”<br />Adhering to the deadlines is very important!<br />Explanation of the process by Lane Greer<br />
  24. 24. Wiki Markup<br />Example of the process<br />Andy writes an article in Word.<br />He emails it to me, along with a photo/graphic or two.<br /> I put it into the Wiki, along with the graphic(s). It will be marked up at that point, so that lists will appear as lists and not paragraphs, for instance.<br />I notify the first reviewer (let's call her Barbara) that the article is in the Wiki and ready for review.<br /> Barbara makes changes in the Wiki. (I anticipate a lot of calls at this point on how to use the Wiki, and I'm happy to help everybody individually. And I mean that.)<br />Barbara sends the revised article to the second reviewer (Charlie). <br />Charlie makes his changes and notifies me that the article has been through review.<br /> I edit the copy, make final changes, and move the article into the 'Ready to Publish' area.<br />
  25. 25. Assignments & Deadlines<br />50 articles by August 31st<br />Approx. three - four articles per content area<br />Another 50 articles by November 1st<br />Volunteers to take one, two or more content areas<br />Additional comments/suggestions from Lane Greer<br />
  26. 26. Content Subcategories<br />Vineyard Site Selection <br />Grape Varieties <br />Rootstocks <br />Trellis and Training Systems <br />Economics and Business Management <br />General Vineyard Management <br />Training Young Vines <br />Pruning <br />Canopy Management <br /><ul><li>Disease Management
  27. 27. Insect Management
  28. 28. Vertebrate Pest Management
  29. 29. Weed and Floor Management
  30. 30. Vine Nutrition and Fertilization
  31. 31. Irrigation and Water Management
  32. 32. Maturity Monitoring and Harvest </li></li></ul><li>Meeting Wrap-Up<br />Confirm assignments & deadlines<br />Future Meetings<br />Questions?<br />Adjourn<br />

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