Conole r mcpoerup

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  • http://wikieducator.org/images/7/7a/Recyclethis-185807557.jpg
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  • http://invisibleman.com/wsj_whirlpool.jpgWe think there is opportunity (and accompanying challenge) for educational institutions to be early adopters of low cost and no-frills model to avoid the ongoing spiral of increased costs coupled with decreased government funding and increasing student resistance and incapacity to pay high tuition fees. To make such a transition challenges many of the traditional ideals and systems of higher education institutions based on pre-net ideals and technologies. Many will fail to adapt and go out of business; some may continue serving an elite that can afford the high costs.  The open universities have a particular challenge and opportunity to embrace these disruptive technologies and pedagogies as these initiatives speak directly to their mandate of increasing access. If both public campuses and online systems do not adapt and move to exploit these network affordances, then it leaves a tremendous opportunity that can be filled by private, for profit entrepreneurs. Whitesides (2011) tells that the race may not be to the swift, but to the cheap, noting that "affordability in the future may be the first requirement not an afterthought."
  • http://www.irenehaidner.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/movies.jpghttp://buildingabrandonline.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/music-notes1.jpghttp://shopforbrands.net/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/web-shopping.jpg We think there is opportunity (and accompanying challenge) for educational institutions to be early adopters of low cost and no-frills model to avoid the ongoing spiral of increased costs coupled with decreased government funding and increasing student resistance and incapacity to pay high tuition fees. To make such a transition challenges many of the traditional ideals and systems of higher education institutions based on pre-net ideals and technologies. Many will fail to adapt and go out of business; some may continue serving an elite that can afford the high costs.  
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  • . This increasing tuition cost has not been ignored by private sector entrepreneurs - as evidenced by the rapid growth of many for-profit postsecondary companies - notably the Apollo Group that owns the University of Phoenix, the Capella group with Capella University, and many others. Response, to these entrants into the postsecondary sector from traditional public and non-profit providers has normally taken the form of censure, complaint to public funders and derision of the product (Complaints Board, 2011). Nonetheless students, acting as consumers continue to subscribe to their services.
  • Free-tuition institutions are growing. These non-profit institutions are using OER. However, credible solutions for providing assessment and credentialisation services are neededhttp://www.onlineschools.org/inside-online-schools/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/Free.jpg
  • In the remainder of this paper we suggest which of the services can be unbundled to create a model of university education provision that entails much lower costs for students – and/or potential for profit by private interests. We examine first the most expensive and most highly-valued service (to faculty at least) of the modern university -the discovery and dissemination of knowledge.  Quality research is expensive and there have been many good arguments demonstrating the positive economic and social benefit to the production and application of new knowledge. We are reluctant to suggest that research should be eliminated from the core function of the university, but do argue that it must be rationalized, strategic and focused. We are likely past the point where individual curiosity, unencumbered by social need, relevancy and cost efficiency can be the major driver of research funding in most universities. Recent developments using networks however promise considerable cost effectiveness in research that has not been realized in many disciplines (Nielsen, 2012). The interest in ‘open science’, that compels or induces researchers to make transparent and available their data and the processes by which they discover new knowledge, is the basis for increasing collaboration and reducing unnecessary competition (Mukherjee & Stern, 2009). Network connectivity and software also greatly enhances the capacity for creating new networks of researchers, sharing and archiving data, linking multidiscipline inquiry, discovery and filtering information and in other ways making research collaboration more effective and efficient. The cost to institutional libraries for scholarly journals has resulted in a throttle on dissemination and grossly high profit margins enjoyed by commercial journal publishers (Monbiot, 2011). Open Access publishing of peer reviewed articles is growing in all disciplines and both universities and governments are taking efforts to at least encourage, and sometimes to compel, faculty to disseminate their research results in ways that are accessible globally, at little or no cost to end users.
  • http://wikieducator.org/images/thumb/e/e9/OER-Theory-of-action.jpg/750px-OER-Theory-of-action.jpg
  • The race may not be to the swift, but to the cheaphttp://pubs.acs.org/cen/_img/85/i13/8513cov2_friedmancxd.jpgWe think there is opportunity (and accompanying challenge) for educational institutions to be early adopters of low cost and no-frills model to avoid the ongoing spiral of increased costs coupled with decreased government funding and increasing student resistance and incapacity to pay high tuition fees. To make such a transition challenges many of the traditional ideals and systems of higher education institutions based on pre-net ideals and technologies. Many will fail to adapt and go out of business; some may continue serving an elite that can afford the high costs.  The open universities have a particular challenge and opportunity to embrace these disruptive technologies and pedagogies as these initiatives speak directly to their mandate of increasing access. If both public campuses and online systems do not adapt and move to exploit these network affordances, then it leaves a tremendous opportunity that can be filled by private, for profit entrepreneurs. Whitesides (2011) tells that the race may not be to the swift, but to the cheap, noting that "affordability in the future may be the first requirement not an afterthought."
  • Conole r mcpoerup

    1. 1. POERUP Gráinne Conole, University of Leicester Rory McGreal Athabasca UniversityEFQUEL Innovation Forum Granada, Spain 5th – 7th September 2012 Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License (some images fair use)
    2. 2. • Stimulate uptake of OER by policy – Evidence-based policies• Study end-user–producer communities• In-depth Euro case-studies & selected others• Recommendations & actions• Trustworthy and balanced research results
    3. 3. Partners SERO
    4. 4. Context and rationale• Over ten years of the OER movement• Hundreds of OER repositories worldwide• Evaluation shows lack of uptake by teachers and learners• Shift from development to community building and articulation of OER practice
    5. 5. Focus• Stimulating uptake of OER through policy• Building on previous initiatives (eg. OPAL, Olnet)• Through country reports and case studies• Evaluate successful OER communities
    6. 6. Outputs• Inventory > 100 OER initiatives• 11 country reports• 13 mini-reports• 7 in-depth case studies• 3 EU-wide policy papers• 7 options brief packs for EU nations/regions
    7. 7. Progress• Country reports – Draft country reports available – http://poerup.referata.com/wiki/Main_Page• Case studies – Identified – Methodology chosen (Social Network Analysis) – Instruments being development (Survey plus semi-structured interviews)
    8. 8. Country reports: key themes• Diversity of educational contexts and maturity of internet provision and use of e-learning• Differences in policy support & funding for OER initiatives• Diversity from basic OER awareness to OER maturity and embedding• Few national OER initiatives
    9. 9. Emergent themes• Shift from development to OER practices• Broader notion of open practices – open learning, teaching and research• Use of social and participatory media to foster OER communities
    10. 10. UK Country Report• Significant funding from JISC/HEA – three phase OER programme with around 100 OER initiatives• Individual fellowships through SCORE and Olnet funding• Institutionally supported initiatives• Main activity in England, little in other countries Ming Nie
    11. 11. UK Country Report• Funding mainly from government – top-down• Funding mainly on production/producers, little on end-users or impact on learning• Mainly HE/FE, little school-based• Most institutions don’t have an OER strategy• Lots on cascading and transferring of experience• Most institutions have an OER repository• Related work: iTunesU and MOOCs
    12. 12. Challenges• Decreased government funding• Avoid the ongoing spiral of increased costs• Student incapacity to pay high tuition
    13. 13. Disaggregated industries
    14. 14. NO FRILLS• Volkswagen Fiat, Ryanair, Walmart, Easyjet
    15. 15. NO FRILLS• Banking, groceries, department stores, travel agencies, accommodations, mobile telephony, stock brokering
    16. 16. For Profit Universities• Rapid growth• Profit on govt loans to students• Censure, complaints from public institutions• Growing numbers of students
    17. 17. OERu
    18. 18. Do we need and can we afford the full bundle?
    19. 19. OER UniversityConcept Jim Taylor
    20. 20. Wayne Macintosh
    21. 21. Change"Lets put all this hype about change andtransformation in perspective. Its underhyped." "Theres something coming after us, and I imagine it is something wonderful.” " Danny Hillis, Wired
    22. 22. • “Affordability in the future may be the first requirement not an afterthought.” Whitesides (2011)The race may not be to theswift, but to the cheap
    23. 23. http://www.poerup.info
    24. 24. Further informationhttp://www.poerup.info/

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