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Launch of Framework for Ecosystem Restoration Monitoring (FERM)

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Launch of Framework for Ecosystem Restoration Monitoring (FERM)

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Presented during AO: Monitoring the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration – Launch of the Framework for Ecosystem Restoration Monitoring (FERM) and Dryland Restoration Initiative Platform (DRIP) session of GLF Africa

Presented during AO: Monitoring the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration – Launch of the Framework for Ecosystem Restoration Monitoring (FERM) and Dryland Restoration Initiative Platform (DRIP) session of GLF Africa

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Launch of Framework for Ecosystem Restoration Monitoring (FERM)

  1. 1. Launch of Framework for Ecosystem Restoration Monitoring (FERM) Julian Fox, FAO Senior Forestry Officer Fidaa F. Haddad, FAO Forestry Officer GLF Africa 3 June 2021
  2. 2. Task Force on Monitoring Overview Terms of Reference – Launched 31st March 2020 Develop a monitoring framework, indicators, normative guidance, case studies as a technical pillar to the United Nations Decade on Ecosystem Restoration Expected outputs 1. Framework for Ecosystem Restoration Monitoring (FERM) – for Decade reporting and restoration stakeholders 2. Technical solutions with training material for monitoring, country pilots and case studies 3. Geospatial dissemination platform for data access and for transparency
  3. 3. Task Force on Monitoring Structure Summary note on Task Force for Monitoring http://www.fao.org/3/cb0424en/cb0424en.pdf • Over 270 technical experts from 100 organizations engaged with a shared vision: Sound monitoring can catalyze investments and ensure science- based actions • Experts divided into three Sub Task Forces • To propose and agree on a Monitoring Framework (FERM) by mid-2021 • Close collaboration with Best Practice TF Monitoring Task Force Terrestrial ecosystems Sub TF e.g. Forests, Pasture, Croplands Aquatic and transitional ecosystems Sub TF e.g. Coastal, Sea grass, Tidal marshes, Coral reef, Mangroves, Peatlands, Lakes and rivers Socio- economic Sub TF e.g. drivers, impacts, effectiveness of restoration from socio-economic aspect
  4. 4. Task Force on Monitoring FERM Geospatial Platform FERM User Guide available with step-by-step instructions http://www.fao.org/3/cb5046en/cb5046en.pdf Based on FAO’s Hand-In-Hand Geospatial architecture Ø Explore geospatial information related to soil, water, vegetation, and socio-economics for your ecosystem of interest Ø Access tools and guidance for restoration planning and monitoring Ø Upload and integrate geospatial data locally, nationally, regionally, and globally in private work-space Ø Create compelling restoration impact stories, based on user specific geospatial data for a defined area of interest Ø Apply advanced functionality with integration of FAO’s cloud computing platform SEPAL – mobile compatible www.data.apps.fao.org/ferm www.fao.org/national-forest-monitoring/ferm www.sepal.io
  5. 5. Task Force on Monitoring FERM Registry – upcoming functionality Contact us at: restoration-monitoring@fao.org to contribute FERM Registry for recording geospatial information on restoration projects - can visualise and disseminate project data through the FERM platform Integrate and be interoperable with other restoration platforms (DRIP) Shared vision among platform developers toward interoperability – WEF, 1t.org, WRI, Climate Focus, IUCN, Restor, Tentree – collectively catalysing investment in restoration through transparent monitoring
  6. 6. Dryland Restoration Initiative Platform DRIP with the ground Linking the cloud
  7. 7. Dryland Restoration Initiative Platform DRIP Monitoring & Reporting Tool In the form of an interactive web portal Module Hosted in FERM The Ecosystem Restoration Monitoring (FERM) platform Biophysical & Socio- Economic Indicators Extent, tree cover, carbon sequestration, biodiversity, demand, gaps, needs Synergies with existing databases UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration and long term sustainability of the platform Improve the Monitoring Different dryland restoration projects, while giving the possibility to associate it with LDN monitoring
  8. 8. DRIP Advancing monitoring efforts in drylands
  9. 9. DRIP Advancing monitoring efforts in drylands Support practitioners and decision-makers in strengthening their baseline datasets about current initiatives and consequently to fine-tune their interventions and opportunities to achieve LDN targets. Voluntary use by different LDN committee working group, decision-makers and practitioners to monitor and evaluate the LDN TPPs and results achieved. Support Donors to inform their funding decisions on the LDN projects and Programmes. Support & document the importance of gender responsiveness indigenous people and traditional knowledge within the LDN implementation efforts. Document lessons learned on good practices in relation to LDN from the different transformation projects and programmes (TPPs).
  10. 10. FERM-DRIP Registry Integration
  11. 11. 1. Project Registration 2. Area of Interest 3. Default Characteristics 4. Definition of Activities 5. Indicator Selection 6. Advanced Characterization 7. Additional Information DRIP: FERM FERM-DRIP Registry Integration The Ecosystem Restoration Monitoring 8. Analysis & Results
  12. 12. FERM-DRIP Registry Integration DRIP: Monitoring, implementation, mid-term Stage 2 Inception & Planning Stage 1 LDN process for project evaluation Stage 3 1. Site Description 2. Landscape Management & Restoration 3. Governance 4. Field Implementation 5. Monitoring • Projects @ Programme Level • Data for LDN sub indicators / monitoring status • Projects @ National / International Level
  13. 13. FERM-DRIP Registry Integration DRIP: Monitoring, implementation, mid-term Stage 2 Inception & Planning Stage 1 LDN process for project evaluation Stage 3
  14. 14. FERM-DRIP Registry Integration DRIP: Monitoring, implementation, mid-term Stage 2 Inception & Planning Stage 1 LDN process for project evaluation Stage 3
  15. 15. FERM-DRIP Registry Integration DRIP: Monitoring, implementation, mid-term Stage 2 Inception & Planning Stage 1 LDN process for project evaluation Stage 3
  16. 16. DRIP Development Implementation Timeline Consultation with dryland experts, evaluation of needs and possibilities Align DRIP with FERM. Creating monitoring synergies DRIP - FERM piloting 25 countries. Assessment at different implementation level Design of Data analysis for capturing progress towards LDN Incorporation of user feedback, expert consultations, training of DRIP use for scaling up Piloting experiences pave the way for countries to use DRIP in monitoring their restoration towards LDN 2020 2021 2022 Twenty- Five countries are piloting the integration of FERM/ DRIP to inform the development of resource-efficient and fit-for-purpose monitoring systems that generates quality data and information and supports domestic restoration needs and other reporting processes with strong ownership by governments, and restoration stake-holders.
  17. 17. Access to anybody committed to restoration Through DRIP, anyone involved in restoration initiatives in Drylands can report on progress, learn from on-the-ground success stories and contribute to achievement of the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration ambitions.
  18. 18. An Opportunity to Think Outside the Box The unfortunate circumstances caused by the global pandemic have provided us with an opportunity to think outside the box and connect the efforts coming from the field in an innovative way. Now more than ever, we have to invest and link the cloud with the ground to truly ensure impact and knowledge sharing across the world.
  19. 19. Turn Back Time and Reverse Damage Drylands are reservoirs of ecosystems that can help us turn back time and reverse damage. Monitoring progress on the achievement of land degradation neutrality and sharing lessons learned must be a priority to ensure success and upscaling.
  20. 20. LINKING THE CLOUD WITH THE GROUND Piloting the Drylands Restoration Initiative Platform Lessons learned from Zimbabwe
  21. 21. Zimbabwe Overview
  22. 22. LDN Targets – Zimbabwe
  23. 23. Challenges in Zimbabwe for tracking projects contribution to LDN targets • The focal point for UNCCD in Zimbabwe is the Environmental Management Agency and the agency is currently settling up an M&E system. • Most government institutions in sectors such as environment, agriculture and energy implement activities that contribute to LDN targets and such institutions do not have robust M&E systems in place. • NGOs working on activities that contribute to LDN have M&E systems but these are fragmented. The challenge in both government institutions and NGOs is that there is lack of expertise, financial resources for setting up all the necessary components e.g. Clearing Houses etc. • Capturing of Contribution of drylands projects to LDN targets and reporting to UNCCD has been problematic. A working group has been put in place but it has not been operationalised.
  24. 24. DRIP testing – 2 projects Sustainable management of Miombo and Mopane production landscapes in Save and Runde sub-basins following an LDN approach. Sustainable forest and land management in The Hwange Sanyati Biological Corridor Project (HSBCP) area (5, 4 million ha)
  25. 25. Feedback on the DRIP piloting
  26. 26. Hwange Sanyati Biological Corridor Project (HSBCP) 53,685 hectares (Sikumi Forest) Historical period: 2000-2014 Monitoring period for ind. 15.3.1: 2018-2020
  27. 27. SDG 15.3.1 Land degradation seems to have stabilized
  28. 28. Tools and innovation for ecosystem restoration monitoring GLF Africa: Monitoring the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration Yelena Finegold FAO Forestry Officer 3 June 2021 29
  29. 29. Framework for Ecosystem Restoration Monitoring FERM • Multi-dimensional monitoring needs: ü Ecosystem type ü Scale (global, landscape, project) ü Time frame ü Objective • No one size fits all tools or data for restoration monitoring Citizen science Field data Sensor data 30
  30. 30. FERM: Indicator Selection and Tool Mapping Monitoring progress on ecosystem restoration Terrestrial Aquatic & Transitional Socio-Economic Over 150 tools and platforms mapped 31
  31. 31. SDG monitoring SDG 15.3.1 – proportion of land that is degraded over total land area Data on land degradation is reported by countries to UNCCD, enabled by clear guidance documents and easy to use tools 32
  32. 32. Monitoring: Land & forest restoration Sustainable forestland resource management in a humanitarian crisis zone – Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh Increase in land and wood fuel demand after massive refugee influx in August 2017 Restoration activities started in September 2018 Indicator: Reduction in land degradation Data used: National land cover maps, soil organic carbon, land productivity dynamics 33 2019-2020 2017-2018
  33. 33. Monitoring: Forest restoration Assisted natural regeneration in Putumayo, Colombia 34 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 650 700 750 800 1985 1991 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 Vegetation trend from Landsat data 1985-2020 Revegetation using native species in 2008 Vegetation index Indicator: increase in tree and forest cover
  34. 34. Monitoring: Drylands restoration The Great Green Wall: Sanpelga, Burkina Faso Delfino plough Micro-basins by the plough After rainy season Action and monitoring on the ground Monitoring of planted area from satellite imagery 35 Sentinel-1 radar data Monitor land preparation, report exact date and revise boundaries to improve measurements of areas prepared for planting
  35. 35. Monitoring: Peatland restoration Indonesia 36 Canal dam for peatland restoration. Source: Marcel Silvius, Wetlands International In degraded peatlands the creation of canals to establish crop plantations leads to water drainage and the consequent soil degradation and soil organic carbon loss. Peatland restoration consists of blocking these canals using dams to rewet the area. Ground sensors are used to collect data on soil moisture and ground water levels using SEPAL the data is transformed into maps that show trends in moisture and water levels in the peatlands. Indonesian government peatland monitoring situation room Data: Sentinel-1, GDLAS and ground water level measurements
  36. 36. Key messages UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration Monitoring Task Force is a participatory effort, • mobilizing many actors to identify indicators, tools and data for monitoring the restoration of ecosystems • identifying gaps that provide opportunities to integrate tools and methods for monitoring 37
  37. 37. se.plan • Spatially explicit forest restoration planning tool – FAO Open Foris SEPAL (se) – Google Earth Engine-based • Emphasizes socio-economics (se): benefits, costs, risks 38 https://www.infolinks.com/wp- content/uploads/2010/09/Mygoodpage-Plants-Trees-in- Africa.png
  38. 38. Low and middle income Countries and territories spanned by the tool 39
  39. 39. Defining potential restoration sites Start with potential tree cover (Bastin et al. 2019) 40 Remove sites where actual = potential Remove urban areas
  40. 40. Key features 1. User input: a. Select area of interest (AOI): country, group of countries, region within country b. Rate restoration benefits: Local livelihoods Wood production Biodiversity conservation Carbon sequestration c. Apply constraints: ecological and socioeconomic risks 2. Tool output • Maps, charts, numerical values • Restoration suitability index (1-5 scale): relative benefit-cost ratio for each 1 km2 grid cell − Benefits = weighted sum, with weights based on user ratings − Costs = land opportunity cost + forest establishment cost
  41. 41. Constraints Biophysical Forest change Socio-economic Elevation Climate risk Current land cover Slope Deforestation rate Protected area Annual rainfall Natural regeneration Population density Terrestrial ecoregion variability Declining population Baseline water stress Accessibility to cities Property rights protection
  42. 42. Demonstration Video Visit sepal.io to explore the tool.
  43. 43. Test alternative priority rankings

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