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The Project Manager as Business Analyst

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The project manager (PM) and business analyst (BA) have to be key allies in the management of any project. That can be difficult when project work is duplicated because of the overlapping tasks defined by the International Institute of Business Analysis (IIBA®) and the Project Management Institute (PMI®).

Still, as long as roles are clearly defined and understood, the two can cooperate and collaborate, instead of competing.

In this hour-long webinar, Global Knowledge instructor and PMP-certified project management expert Daniel Stober will explain how to delineate the roles.

ABOUT THE PRESENTER: Dan Stober is a PMP-certified project manager with over ten years of experience managing projects. His experience includes managing projects for the U.S. government in the United States, Middle East, and Europe.

Published in: Data & Analytics
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The Project Manager as Business Analyst

  1. 1. The Project Manager as Business Analyst Dan Stober
  2. 2. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 2 Today’s Objectives After this webinar, you will have a more complete understanding of: • How the project manager (PM) and business analyst (BA) competencies align • What is in the domain of the PM and of the BA • Why the PM and BA should work together • The importance of basic BA training for the PM 1-2
  3. 3. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 3 What We’ll Cover  Organizational structure as a driver  Alignment of competencies  Requirements charter vs. project charter  Product vision and scope vs. project scope  How traceability helps the PM and the BA  Leadership roles of the PM and BA  Suggested training for the PM on BA
  4. 4. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 4 Organizational Structure and Its Influence (PMI®) Functional Weak Matrix Balanced Matrix Strong Matrix Projectized Project Manager’s Authority Little or none Low Low to moderate Moderate to high High to almost total Resource Availability Little or none Low Low to moderate Moderate to high High to almost total Who Manages the Project Budget Functional manager Functional manager Mixed Project manager Project manager Project Manager’s Role Part-time Part-time Full-time Full-time Full-time Project Management Administrative Staff Part-time Part-time Part-time Full-time Full-time Organization Structure Project Aspect A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide) — Fifth Edition, Project Management Institute, Inc., 2013, Figure 2-1, 22. Matrix
  5. 5. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 5 Project Stakeholders (PMI)  It is important to identify stakeholders  Who is or should be involved?  Who is external to the organization?  Who has “bought in” and who has not?  Who can influence the projects performance or outcome?
  6. 6. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 6 Stakeholders and Requirements  For projects (PMI) A stakeholder is anyone who has a vested interest in the project or product  For requirements elicitation (IIBA) There is specific interest in any stakeholder who can provide requirements directly or knows where to get the requirements
  7. 7. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 7 Executive/Management Stakeholders (IIBA®)  Executives provide:  Business requirements  Direction the enterprise is heading  Managers and department leaders:  May have insight into problems and ideas for potential solutions within their sphere of influence  Know the “why” but not the “how”  Can create requirements conflicts  May provide key NFRs such as look and feel, performance, cultural, and legal  Are familiar with key business documents containing policies and business rules
  8. 8. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 8 Technical Stakeholders  Can include SMEs or managers  Understand the needs of the design team  Can provide many NFRs (reliability, availability, etc.)  Can provide functional requirements for technical functions  Can translate business functional requirements into technical terms  Can provide technical constraints and implementation requirements  Are familiar with key technical standards documents and system interfaces  May have insight into problems and ideas for potential solutions within their work environment
  9. 9. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 9 Secondary Sources  Technical standards  Business documents  Policies and procedures  Process documentation  Business rules  Websites and knowledge databases  System interface documentation  Legacy systems
  10. 10. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 10 Stakeholder Management Plan (PMI) Stakeholder communication requirements Information to be communicated (format, content, level of detail, etc.) Interrelationships among stakeholders Expected impact of engagement Scope and impact of change to stakeholders Desired and current levels of engagement Includes:
  11. 11. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 11 Elicitation Plan (IIBA, BABOK®)  Purpose  Organizes elicitation events  Key schedule for elicitation team  Contents  Documentation of all planned and executed elicitation events  Part of requirements communication plan  For each event  Event type  Event description  Participants  Logistics  Schedule and status  Questions to be answered  Archive file name
  12. 12. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 12 Collect Requirements Process (PMI) Scope management plan Requirements management plan (output from Define Scope) Stakeholder management plan Project charter Stakeholder register Interviews Focus groups Facilitated workshops Group creativity techniques Group decision-making techniques Questionnaires and surveys Observations Prototypes Benchmarking Context diagrams Document analysis Requirements documentation Requirements traceability matrix A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide) — Fifth Edition, Project Management Institute, Inc., 2013, Figure 5-4, 111.
  13. 13. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 13 Purpose of a Requirements Charter  Defines the work and deliverables of the requirements team  Provides focus for the requirements team  Is a communications tool for stakeholders and executives  Provides a common understanding between the BA and the PM  Contains a record of requirements efforts for the BA
  14. 14. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 14 Contents of a Requirements Charter  Business need  Product description  Product: in scope/out of scope  Requirements development scope: work of the team  Requirements development deliverables  Requirements development resources  Requirements development milestones  Requirements risk  BA  PM
  15. 15. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 15 Outputs Project Charter: Components Project purpose or justification Measurable objectives or goals High-level requirements High-level project description High-level project boundaries Summary milestone schedule Summary budget Initial assumptions and constraints Project manager’s name, responsibility, and authority level Project approval requirements (signatures and acceptance)
  16. 16. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 16 Why Is the Charter Important?  Gives the project manager authority  Formally recognizes the project  States project goals and objectives  Commits the organization’s resources to the project  Is signed by the sponsor
  17. 17. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 17 Characteristics of Well-Written Requirements  Allocatable  Attainable  Complete  Consistent  Correct  Not a solution  Feasible  Testable  Necessary  Prioritized  Traceable  Unambiguous  Understandable  Verifiable
  18. 18. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 18 Requirements Analysis Activities and Techniques  Activities include:  Solution decomposition: goals, features, functions  Analysis of stakeholder requirements  Analysis of functional requirements  Analysis of nonfunctional requirements  Determination of assumptions and constraints  Techniques include:  Business process analysis  Process and data modeling
  19. 19. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 19 Requirements Communication Activities (IIBA)  Create a requirements communication plan  Manage requirements conflicts  Determine appropriate requirement package for:  Stakeholder requirements  Solution requirements  Present requirements  Hold meetings for reviewing requirements  Obtain signoff for the requirements
  20. 20. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 20 Communications Management Plan (PMI) Stakeholder communication requirements Information to be communicated (format, content, level of detail, etc.) Reason for communication Time frame and frequency Person responsible for communication Person responsible for authorizing communication Who will be the receivers Includes:
  21. 21. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 21 Communications Management Plan (PMI) Methods/technology Escalation process Methods of updating Glossary of common terms Flow chart Constraints Guidelines for project status/team meetings, emails, and e-meetings Includes:
  22. 22. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 22 Scope Definition Activities 1. Identify business requirements or goals 2. Elicit information from key stakeholders about:  Current environment  What needs to be changed 3. Document the current environment with a business use case diagram 4. Highlight the proposed scope on the business use case diagram 5. Develop and present the business case 6. Make the decision to proceed
  23. 23. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 23 Overview of Project Scope Management Product Scope vs. Project Scope Project scope Work needed to deliver the product Work measured against project management plan Product scope Features making up the product: Conditions Capabilities Features measured against predefined requirements
  24. 24. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 24 Define Scope Process Project Scope Statement Product scope description Project deliverables Project boundaries (inclusions and exclusions) Product acceptance criteria Project constraints Project assumptions
  25. 25. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 25 Why Trace?  Links back to business needs  Reduces risk of dropping requirements  Reduces risk of adding unnecessary requirements  Helps evaluation of potential impact of proposed changes  Traces test cases or scenarios to requirements  Ensures that requirements are met
  26. 26. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 26 Interaction Skills Facilitation Negotiation Leadership Influencing Motivating
  27. 27. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 27 Takeaways for PMs  Work with your BA (if you have one or more)  Know your limitations if you are not trained  Set expectations and shape perceptions (stakeholder management)
  28. 28. © 2014 Global Knowledge Training LLC. All rights reserved. 8/1/2014 Page 28 Learn More Recommended Global Knowledge Courses  Business Analysis Essentials  Business Process Analysis  Requirements Development, Documentation and Management Request an On-Site Delivery  We can tailor our courses to meet your needs  We can deliver them in a private setting Visit Our Knowledge Center  Assessments  Blog  Case Studies  Demos  Lab Topologies  Special Reports  Twitter  Videos  Webinars  White Papers
  29. 29. Thank You for Attending For more information contact us at: www.globalknowledge.com | 1-800-COURSES | am_info@globalknowledge.com

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