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Inside the Carpe 
Carpe Diem MOOC: 
Practical Lessons 
Learnt 
Professor Gilly Salmon 
Professor Janet Gregory 
3/12/2014 ...
MOOC Aims 
1. Enable more educators to design for online and blended 
learning through the Carpe Diem methods 
2. Embed ex...
Stage 1: 
Write Blueprint 
Stage 6 
Action Plan 
Stage 2: 
Create Storyboard 
Stage 5: 
Review & 
Adjust 
Stage 3 Build 
P...
Carpe Diem MOOC: Plan 
• 6 weeks: March – April 2014 
• Blackboard Coursesites 
• Based on well researched and tested lear...
Map of participants 
3/12/2014 
Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 
Salmon & Gregory 
5
Participation Rates 
No. of Participants registered 
1404 
No. of participants started 
1029 
No. of participants accessin...
The CD MOOC Survey (N=155): 
Gender Distribution 
3/12/2014 
Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & 
Gregory 
7
Level of Education 
14% 78% 8% 
Bachelor Degree 
Postgraduate 
Other 
3/12/2014 
Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & 
Gregory ...
Exploring the MOOC Matrix 
3/12/2014 
Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 
Salmon & Gregory 
9
Key Lessons Learnt 
• Design: scaffolding, activities 
• Interaction, collaboration & group work 
• Facilitation 
• Techno...
Pedagogical Design and 
Scaffolding 
•Scaffolded learning - 5 stage 
model pedagogical framework 
(Salmon, 2011) 
•E-tivit...
3/12/2014 
Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & 
Gregory 
12
E-tivities 
3/12/2014 
Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 
Salmon & Gregory 
13
MOOC Groups 
Group name Number of 
groups 
Crab 6 
Dolphin 5 
Jelly Fish 8 
Lobster 8 
Octopus 8 
Penguin 8 
Seahorse 8 
T...
Facilitation 
• 5-8 groups per facilitator 
• Trained as e-moderators 
• Light touch 
• Personalised to groups 
3/12/2014 ...
Technologies for Interaction 
• Emails 
• Announcements 
• Videos 
• Discussion forum/board – groups and community 
• Coll...
Resources & Materials 
• Scalability: resources available for use/re-use 
• Videos available through Swinburne Commons 
• ...
MOOC Materials 
• Investment in developing MOOC so aim for re-use of materials 
• Success overall of MOOC itself 
• Option...
Digital Badges available 
3/12/2014 
2.2: Look and Feel 3.1: Storyboard 4.1: Create an E-tivity 
Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 
S...
Digital Badges 
• Designed to motivate and reward 
• 6 Badges – badge for each week (2-6) plus final Mozilla Open 
Badge 
...
Professional Development 
• Teams from different universities 
• Worked on own units 
• Opportunities to utilise MOOCs to ...
Research Findings: 
the Learners’ Experience 
3/12/2014 
Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 
Salmon & Gregory 
22
Survey Respondents 
• 155 participants responded to the survey, 
of these 
• 78% hold post-graduate qualifications 
• 90% ...
Interaction, Collaboration & 
Groups 
• Survey respondents typically enjoyed collaborating 
and sharing with peers: 
—“lik...
Interaction and Collaboration 
• Sustained collaboration with others could be 
challenging due to high dropout rates: 
—“t...
Group Work 
• Group discussions perceived as valuable 
• Key challenge of sustained collaboration 
due to attrition 
• “Th...
The Learners Experience: 
Research Outcomes 
Social Media – Generally positive. Objections are: 
• Many respondents did no...
The Learners Experience: 
Research Outcomes 
Badges as motivators 
• While it was participants’ intrinsic motivation 
that...
Digital Badges 
• Designed to motivate and reward 
• 6 Badges – badge for each week (2-6) plus final Mozilla Open 
Badge 
...
Survey responses to the question 
(n=155): 
“did you enjoy earning badges” 
Response % 
(Strongly) Agree 74.4 
Neither Agr...
Survey responses to the question 
(n=155): 
“Would you use badges in your 
practice?” 
Response % 
Yes 72.4 
No 13.8 
Answ...
Professional Development 
• The CD MOOC has the potential to successfully 
influence or embed the Carpe Diem process into ...
Professional Development 
• Value of being a learner in the online environment 
• Applicability of e-tivities and learning...
Professional Development 
• Survey respondents engaged positively with the Carpe 
Diem learning design process and particu...
Facilitators 
• role of online teacher or e-moderator has a major influence on 
learners flexibility and achievements (Daw...
About carpe diem learning 
design 
• www.gillysalmon.com/carpe-diem 
• contact 
• jgregory@swin.edu.au 
• gillysalmon@uwa....
Acknowledgements 
Thanks to: 
Blackboard and CourseSites 
Swinburne Commons 
Swinburne ITS 
Swinburne Library 
Swinburne M...
References: 
Antin, J., & Churchill, E. (2011). Badges in social media: A social psychological 
perspective. 
Cho, M.-H., ...
References 
Knox, J. (2014). Digital culture clash: “massive” education in the e-learning and digital cultures 
MOOC. Dist...
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Carpe Diem MOOC:Practical Lessons Learnt- Berlin, Online Educa 2014

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Online Educa Berlin- 2014, December 03-05
http://www.online-educa.com/programme

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Carpe Diem MOOC:Practical Lessons Learnt- Berlin, Online Educa 2014

  1. 1. Inside the Carpe Carpe Diem MOOC: Practical Lessons Learnt Professor Gilly Salmon Professor Janet Gregory 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 1
  2. 2. MOOC Aims 1. Enable more educators to design for online and blended learning through the Carpe Diem methods 2. Embed experience of the Carpe Diem learning design process 3. Provide an engaging online experience for educators 4. Enable opportunities for collaboration and support 5. Explore MOOCs as means of expanding knowledge for translation to practice (Salmon, Gregory, Lokuge-Dona and Ross, 2015, in press) 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 2
  3. 3. Stage 1: Write Blueprint Stage 6 Action Plan Stage 2: Create Storyboard Stage 5: Review & Adjust Stage 3 Build Prototype Stage 4 Check Reality 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 3 Carpe Diem Learning Design Methodology
  4. 4. Carpe Diem MOOC: Plan • 6 weeks: March – April 2014 • Blackboard Coursesites • Based on well researched and tested learning design process (Salmon, 2013; Salmon, 2014; Salmon and Wright, 2014) and • Research based pedagogical models (Salmon 2011,13) • Developed by team in Learning Transformations Unit at Swinburne University, Melbourne, Australia 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 4
  5. 5. Map of participants 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 5
  6. 6. Participation Rates No. of Participants registered 1404 No. of participants started 1029 No. of participants accessing course at the end 332 (32% of those that started) No. of Participants that earned all the badges 181 (17.3% of those that started) 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 6
  7. 7. The CD MOOC Survey (N=155): Gender Distribution 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 7
  8. 8. Level of Education 14% 78% 8% Bachelor Degree Postgraduate Other 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 8
  9. 9. Exploring the MOOC Matrix 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 9
  10. 10. Key Lessons Learnt • Design: scaffolding, activities • Interaction, collaboration & group work • Facilitation • Technologies • Resources & materials • Badges • Professional development 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 10
  11. 11. Pedagogical Design and Scaffolding •Scaffolded learning - 5 stage model pedagogical framework (Salmon, 2011) •E-tivites to promote interaction 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 11
  12. 12. 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 12
  13. 13. E-tivities 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 13
  14. 14. MOOC Groups Group name Number of groups Crab 6 Dolphin 5 Jelly Fish 8 Lobster 8 Octopus 8 Penguin 8 Seahorse 8 Total 51 Average 28- 30 participants allocated to each group Facilitator for each group 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 14
  15. 15. Facilitation • 5-8 groups per facilitator • Trained as e-moderators • Light touch • Personalised to groups 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 15
  16. 16. Technologies for Interaction • Emails • Announcements • Videos • Discussion forum/board – groups and community • Collaborate • Social media – Facebook and Twitter 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 16
  17. 17. Resources & Materials • Scalability: resources available for use/re-use • Videos available through Swinburne Commons • Carpe Diem resources: booklet, templates • Links to websites and articles • Creative commons • ReUse 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 17
  18. 18. MOOC Materials • Investment in developing MOOC so aim for re-use of materials • Success overall of MOOC itself • Option of offering again in 2015 • Significant learning for the team • Use of resources for Carpe Diem workshops • Integration of MOOC materials into Graduate Certificate in Learning and Teaching - ongoing 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 18
  19. 19. Digital Badges available 3/12/2014 2.2: Look and Feel 3.1: Storyboard 4.1: Create an E-tivity Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 19 5.1: Reality Check 6.1: Action Plan Carpe Diem Badge
  20. 20. Digital Badges • Designed to motivate and reward • 6 Badges – badge for each week (2-6) plus final Mozilla Open Badge • Achieved on completion of task – verified • 30.7%* of participants earned first badge • 17%* earned all badges, including Open Badge 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 20
  21. 21. Professional Development • Teams from different universities • Worked on own units • Opportunities to utilise MOOCs to support professional development 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 21
  22. 22. Research Findings: the Learners’ Experience 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 22
  23. 23. Survey Respondents • 155 participants responded to the survey, of these • 78% hold post-graduate qualifications • 90% worked in education sector • 67% female • 29 Participated in interviews 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 23
  24. 24. Interaction, Collaboration & Groups • Survey respondents typically enjoyed collaborating and sharing with peers: —“liked the community discussion forum which expanded the discussion to the whole learning community instead of a small group” • Respondents appreciated the diversity of the learning community cohort: —“enjoyed the international quality of the participants” • Some found collaboration difficult, however: —“collaboration was very poor, although the general community forum compensated for that” 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 24
  25. 25. Interaction and Collaboration • Sustained collaboration with others could be challenging due to high dropout rates: —“there was an ...attrition of members and so there were fewer and fewer participants to draw on to collaborate and learn with/from” • Respondents appreciated the group discussions: • “group discussion was the most useful way for my learning” • Some respondents found the big cohort confronting and intimidating: • “the MOOC Community forum [was] too big and impersonal” 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 25
  26. 26. Group Work • Group discussions perceived as valuable • Key challenge of sustained collaboration due to attrition • “The few team members who remained kept me engaged”. 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 26
  27. 27. The Learners Experience: Research Outcomes Social Media – Generally positive. Objections are: • Many respondents did not see value in social media as contributing to their learning outcomes. Instead it was taking away valuable time from the course work. see also (Davies et al., 2010). • Some participants expressed confusion at the range of online communication channels available. See also (Knox, 2014). • Some respondents reluctant to blur social and professional identities using social media. See also (Aghili et al., 2014; Land & Bayne, 2008; Veletsianos & Navarrete, 2012). 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 27
  28. 28. The Learners Experience: Research Outcomes Badges as motivators • While it was participants’ intrinsic motivation that ultimately drove them to complete the course, badges served as extrinsic motivators that gave participants the final push needed to achieve their desired outcomes. • Initial distrust and dislike towards badges amongst participants later transformed into interest and even competitiveness in earning badges. 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 28
  29. 29. Digital Badges • Designed to motivate and reward • 6 Badges – badge for each week (2-6) plus final Mozilla Open Badge • Achieved on completion of task – verified • 30.7%* of participants earned first badge • 17%* earned all badges, including Open Badge • Research evidence • Motivational element (extrinsic motivation) • Applicable to practice (adaptability of badges into teaching practice) * % of students that started the MOOC 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 29
  30. 30. Survey responses to the question (n=155): “did you enjoy earning badges” Response % (Strongly) Agree 74.4 Neither Agree Nor Disagree 18.5 (Strongly) Disagree 7.1 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 30
  31. 31. Survey responses to the question (n=155): “Would you use badges in your practice?” Response % Yes 72.4 No 13.8 Answer not given 6.9 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 31
  32. 32. Professional Development • The CD MOOC has the potential to successfully influence or embed the Carpe Diem process into a participant’s teaching practice. • Many respondents plan to use what they had learnt in the MOOC for their own teaching practice, with some stating that they planned to promote the Carpe Diem method or the pedagogical frameworks to other teaching professionals in their collegial circles. • Intentions to share knowledge may indicate that the MOOC was successful in disseminating the Carpe Diem process, and have positive impacts on academic practices in future. 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 32
  33. 33. Professional Development • Value of being a learner in the online environment • Applicability of e-tivities and learning design model to practice • 81%* agreed e-tivities were engaging and worthwhile • “learning about the Carpe Diem process will be useful for my day job when it comes to designing online courses and helping teaching staff design them themselves”. • Team participation * of the 155 survey respondents 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 33
  34. 34. Professional Development • Survey respondents engaged positively with the Carpe Diem learning design process and particularly enjoyed the practical hands-on approach of learning by doing. • Some admitted that participating in e-tivities improved their teaching practices. • Respondents gained valuable knowledge of the Carpe Diem process, and were looking forward to using it in their own future design of online courses, and further disseminating the Carpe Diem process to others in their professional circles. 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 34
  35. 35. Facilitators • role of online teacher or e-moderator has a major influence on learners flexibility and achievements (Dawson, 2010; Ruey, 2010; Salmon, 2011) • e-moderator guidance has been shown to positively affect online student discussion and participation (Cho & Kim, 2013; Darabi, Arrastia, Nelson, Cornille, & Liang, 2011; Yuan & Kim, 2014) • to scale up for Carpe Diem MOOC light touch moderating adopted – did not work well. • A stronger focus on the design of e-tivities and how they mediated interaction could compensate for this. • A clearer understanding by participants of the Five Stage Model adapted to a MOOC may alter the participant expectations in relation to e-moderator activity and their own role in mediating interaction. 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 35
  36. 36. About carpe diem learning design • www.gillysalmon.com/carpe-diem • contact • jgregory@swin.edu.au • gillysalmon@uwa.edu.au 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 36
  37. 37. Acknowledgements Thanks to: Blackboard and CourseSites Swinburne Commons Swinburne ITS Swinburne Library Swinburne Marketing Learning Transformations Unit Special thanks to: Dr Kulari Lokuge Dona (Principal Learning Technologist) Carpe Diem is based on original research by Prof Gilly Salmon at the Universities Glasgow Caledonian, Bournemouth and Anglia Ruskin. It was developed further at the Universities of Leicester, Southern Queensland, Northampton and Swinburne University of Technology. See E-tivities 2nd Edition 2013 www.e-tivities.com Chapter 5 gives full details of Carpe Diem. Website for Carpe Diem, handbook and papers: www.gillysalmon.com/carpe-diem 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 37
  38. 38. References: Antin, J., & Churchill, E. (2011). Badges in social media: A social psychological perspective. Cho, M.-H., & Kim, B. J. (2013). Students' self-regulation for interaction with others in online learning environments. Internet and Higher Education, 17, 69-75. Darabi, A., Arrastia, M. C., Nelson, D. W., Cornille, T., & Liang, X. (2011). Cognitive presence in asynchronous online learning: a comparison of four discussion strategies. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 27(3), 216-227. Davies, C., Chase, A.-M., Good, J., & Spencer, D. (2010). Research and development to support the next stage of theHarnessing Technology Strategy. The Learner and their Context. The technology-based experiences of learners as they approach and enter the world of work. A report for Becta: University of Oxford. Dawson, S. (2010). ‘Seeing’ the learning community: An exploration of the development of a resource for monitoring online student networking. British Journal of Educational Technology, 41(5), 736-752. doi: 10.1111/j.1467-8535.2009.00970.x Grant, S., & Shawgo, K. E. (2013). Digital badges: An annotated research bibliography v1. Retrieved 20 June, 2014, from http://hastac.org/digital-badges-bibliography Gregory, J., & Salmon, G. (2013). Professional development for online university teaching. Distance Education, 34(3), 256-270. doi: 10.1080/01587919.2013.835771 Contact: Janet Gregory, jgregory@swin.edu.au 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 38
  39. 39. References Knox, J. (2014). Digital culture clash: “massive” education in the e-learning and digital cultures MOOC. Distance Education, 35(2), 164-177. doi: 10.1080/01587919.2014.917704 Lokuge Dona, K., Gregory, J., Salmon, G., & Pechenkina, E. (2014). Badges in the Carpe Diem MOOC. In Rhetoric and Reality: Critical perspectives on educational technology. Paper presented at the ASCILITE Conference, Dunedin, New Zealand. Ruey, S. (2010). A case study of constructivist instructional strategies for adult online learning. British Journal of Educational Technology, 41(5), 706-720. doi: 10.1111/j.1467- 8535.2009.00965.x Salmon, G. (2011). E-moderating: The key to teaching and learning online (3rd ed.). New York and London: Routledge. Salmon, G. (2013). E-tivities: The key to active online learning (2nd ed.). New York and London: Routledge. Salmon, G. (2014). Carpe Diem - a team based approach to learning design Retrieved from http://www.gillysalmon.com/carpe-diem.html Salmon, G., Gregory, J., Lokuga Dona, K., & Ross, B. (in press). Experiential online development for educators: The example of the Carpe Diem MOOC. British Journal of Educational Technology. Salmon, G., & Wright, P. (2014). Transforming future teaching through ‘Carpe Diem’ learning design. Education Sciences, 4(1), 52-63. Yuan, J., & Kim, C. (2014). Guidelines for facilitating the development of learning communities in online courses. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 30, 220-232. doi: 10.1111/jcal.12042 3/12/2014 Carpe Diem MOOC OEB 14 Salmon & Gregory 39

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