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Introducing to BIM and its benefits across disciplines - Bilal Succar at OICE International Forum on BIM

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BIM implementation stages within organizations, an overview BIM adoption across a market and how to develop a roadmap sharing the responsability of innovation diffusion.

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Introducing to BIM and its benefits across disciplines - Bilal Succar at OICE International Forum on BIM

  1. 1. Organisational Implementation & Macro Adoption Building Information Modelling Dr. Bilal Succar Change Agents + BIMexcellence.com bsuccar@changeagents.com.au Milan, Italy | April 20, 2016
  2. 2. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 2OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM I. Quick Introduction II. BIM transformation within organisations a. BIM Capability Stages b. understanding BIM Uses, Benefits and Effects IV. Developing a market-wide BIM Adoption Policy a. understanding BIM through a Comprehensive Definition b. BIM Maturity Levels III. Evaluating BIM adoption across markets a. Extent of BIM Diffusion b. Macro Maturity Components c. comparing BIM Benefits with typical BIM Leadership a. sample Policy Roadmap c. Diffusion Dynamics d. Policy Actions e. BIM Diffusion Roles and Responsibilities a. sample Policy Development Plan c. Point of Adoption model d. BIM Maturity Matrix
  3. 3. INTRODUCTION 1 of 4
  4. 4. another BIM Definition yet quite a comprehensive one
  5. 5. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 5OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM Building Information Modelling is a set of technologies, processes and policies enabling multiple stakeholders to collaboratively design, construct and operate a facility
  6. 6. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 6OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM (Succar,2008) BIM can be better understood by flipping the term
  7. 7. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 7OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM (Succar, 2008) BIM can be better understood by understanding objects
  8. 8. Benefits, Uses and Effects of BIM on projects and industry stakeholders
  9. 9. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 9OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM main Benefits of BIM model-based cost estimation automated code checking constructible complex geometries …and many more better coordinated drawings improved prefabrication more accurate costs better visual communication BIM improves legacy outcomesBIM delivers new outcomes less rework and RFIs less physical waste less conflict  less waste of time BIM reduces waste cost certainty time certainty elemental certainty BIM improves certainty
  10. 10. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 10OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM 1. Capturing and Representing 2. Planning and Designing 3. Simulating and Quantifying 4. Constructing and Fabricating 5. Operating and Maintaining 6. Monitoring and Controlling 7. Linking and Extending SJB Architects granuland especs cener.com cener.com hbp.usm.my enovaya.com relex / PTC be magazine BIM’s has many uses across an asset’s life cycle: BIM Excellence Model Use Categories Learn more at http://bit.lt/BIMepisode24
  11. 11. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 11OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM Effects of BIM on Design Workflows – partial list: Image: HASSELL  Significant changes to workflow between different design consultants  Changes in cost distribution (not necessarily reflected in payment structures)  New requirements for quantity estimates and detailed simulations to justify design choices  Creation of new roles and re-alignment of varied staff responsibilities
  12. 12. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 12OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM Effects of BIM on Construction Workflows – partial list:  Reduction of design ambiguity and clarification of constructability  Better visualisation of construction sequences and testing of alternatives  Better coordination of trades  Better lift planning and on-time delivery  Better access to on-site information  More accurate onsite set-outs Image: Trimble
  13. 13. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 13OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM Effects of BIM on Owners – partial list:  A more transparent design process  More accurate cost planning  Better collaboration b/w designers  Speedier project delivery through fast-tracking and concurrent engineering During project delivery:  Better maintenance through digitised workflows  Connection with maintenance systems, building management systems, and similar  Linking the asset to other assets through GIS, ERP and other databases/systems Post Construction:
  14. 14. Comparative BIM Benefits by Stakeholder Group (Australia + similar markets)
  15. 15. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 15OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM
  16. 16. BIM Capability and BIM Maturity 2 of 4
  17. 17. BIM Capability Stages as applicable to organisations
  18. 18. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 18OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM p re BIM integ ra ted BIM It is practically impossible to jump from pre-BIM (the status before BIM implementation) to full BIM capability in one step! Frank Gehry A number of intermediary stages separate no BIM from ‘full’ BIM.
  19. 19. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 19OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM 1 2 3 object-based modelling network-based integration model-based collaborationpre BIM post BIM
  20. 20. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 20OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM pre BIM Frank Gehry hand-drawing 2D cad BIM Stages Pre-BIM Status Before the implementation of BIM, organizations are still dependent on manual and 2d CAD tools and processes. Tools similar to AutoCAD® and MicroStation ® are prolifically used to generate scaled drawings and details. (Succar, 2009)
  21. 21. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 21OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM five types of model-based deliverables (Succar, 2009) BIM capability is acquired through the successful implementation of an ‘object- based software tool’ similar to Revit®, Archicad® and Tekla®. BIM Stages BIM Stage 1 object-based modelling These tools can generate five types of model based deliverables and are used to generate single-disciplinary models within either design, construction or operation – the three main Project Lifecycle Phases.
  22. 22. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 22OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM no model interchanges cad 2D and 3D from models (Succar, 2009) BIM Stages BIM Stage 1 object-based modelling BIM capability is acquired through the successful implementation of an ‘object- based software tool’ similar to Revit®, Archicad® and Tekla®. These tools can generate five types of model based deliverables and are used to generate single-disciplinary models within either design, construction or operation – the three Project Lifecycle Phases. Typically 2D documentation is still the main output generated as there are no model interchanges between disciplines.
  23. 23. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 23OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM model interchanges model-linking or federation At Stage 2 players acquire the ability to collaborate with other disciplinary players. Collaboration occurs through an interchange (interoperable exchange) of models through ‘proprietary’ formats (e.g. RVT and NWD) and non- proprietary formats (e.g. IFC). (Succar, 2009) BIM Stages BIM Stage 2 model-based collaboration
  24. 24. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 24OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM images: Autodesk architect engineer owner contractor BIM Stages BIM Stage 2 model-based collaboration At Stage 2 players acquire the ability to collaborate with other disciplinary players. Collaboration occurs through an interchange (interoperable exchange) of models through ‘proprietary’ formats (e.g. RVT and NWD) and non- proprietary formats (e.g. IFC). However, at Stage 2, collaboration between different disciplines is file- based and one-to-one. This keeps stakeholders isolated in their silos with disjointed supply chain workflows.
  25. 25. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 25OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM network-based integration integrated models (not necessarily a single model) At this capability stage, data-rich models are created, shared and maintained collaboratively across Project Lifecycle Phases. This integration can be achieved through ‘model servers’ (using proprietary, open or non-proprietary formats), Cloud Computing, or SaaS (Software as a Service). BIM Stage 3 models are interdisciplinary models allowing complex analyses at early stages of virtual design and construction. BIM Stages BIM Stage 3 (Succar, 2009)
  26. 26. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 26OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM component and materials costs integrated maintenance systems operations business logic geographic information systems (GIS) services grid building management systems (BMS) virtually integrated Design, Construction & Operation (viDCO) BIM Stages post BIM
  27. 27. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 27OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM BIM Maturity Index video http://bit.ly/Video-Maturity 9 mins | CC available This model is also available in Spanish | French | Italian | … refer to BIMThinkSpace Ep13
  28. 28. BIM Maturity as applicable to organisations
  29. 29. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 29OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM
  30. 30. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 30OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM BIM Maturity Index video http://bit.ly/Video-Maturity 9 mins | CC available This model is also available in Spanish | French | Italian | … refer to BIMThinkSpace Ep13
  31. 31. combining capability and maturity the Point of Adoption Model
  32. 32. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 32OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM Video available on the BIM Framework Channel
  33. 33. combining capability and maturity the BIM Maturity Matrix
  34. 34. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 34OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM Download full English version: http://bit.ly/BIM3-English (PDF 578kb) Portuguese: http://bit.ly/BIM3-Portuguese (PDF 711kb)
  35. 35. Evaluating BIM Adoption across markets 3 of 4
  36. 36. different ways to measure BIM Diffusion and Market Maturity
  37. 37. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 37OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM Macro Adoption Models in collaboration with Dr. Mohamad Kassem introduction video http://bit.ly/Video-Macro-Intro
  38. 38. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 38OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM We can measure the Extent of BIM Diffusion across a market by looking at:  How many companies are at each of the three BIM Capability Stages:  Modelling  Collaboration  Integration  Is the market still focusing on technology only or is attentive to BIM processes and BIM policies? In collaboration with Dr. Mohamad Kassem (Teesside University, UK) Evaluating BIM Adoption across markets Video available on the BIM Framework Channel More Information Model A
  39. 39. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 39OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM Video available on the BIM Framework Channel Model available in other languages Evaluating BIM Adoption across markets We can assess the Extent of Market Maturity within a market by measuring 8 components: In collaboration with Dr. Mohamad Kassem (Teesside University, UK) Model B  Objectives, Stages & Milestones  Champions & Drivers  Regulatory Framework  Noteworthy Publications  Learning & Education  Measurements & Benchmarks  Standardised Parts & Deliverables  Technology Infrastructure
  40. 40. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 40OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM Evaluating BIM Adoption across markets We can assess the Market’s BIM Diffusion Dynamics within a market as either:  Top-Down  Bottom-Up  Middle-Out Video available on the BIM Framework Channel In collaboration with Dr. Mohamad Kassem (Teesside University, UK) Model C
  41. 41. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 41OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM Evaluating BIM Adoption across markets We can assess the Policy Maker’s Approach to Policy Development - as either:  Passive  Active  Assertive Video available on the BIM Framework Channel Model available in other languages In collaboration with Dr. Mohamad Kassem (Teesside University, UK) Model D
  42. 42. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 42OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM • Policy Makers • Educational Institutions • Construction Organizations • Individual Practitioners • Technology Developers • Technology Service Providers • Industry Associations • Communities of Practice • Technology Advocates In collaboration with Dr. Mohamad Kassem (Teesside University, UK) Video available on the BIM Framework Channel Model available in other languages Evaluating BIM Adoption across markets We can assess the Role Played by different groups in leading, supporting or participating in BIM Diffusion: Model E
  43. 43. BIM DIFFUSION POLICY developing a market-wide 4 of 4
  44. 44. Macro BIM Adoption sample Policy Roadmap (based on Model B)
  45. 45. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 45OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM Objectives, Stages & Milestones Champions & Drivers Regulatory Framework Noteworthy Publications Learning & Education Measurements & Benchmarks Standardised Parts & Deliverables Technology Infrastructure 2017 2018 2019 20xx2020 Establish basic strategic objectives Define min capability requirements for projects of Type X Define minimum capability requirements and project deliverables for all other types and sizes of projects Establish a high-level task group to develop a national strategy Establish mid-level, regional or specialised satellite task groups to implement the national strategy and develop detailed protocols Dissolve all regional satellite groups and encourage the formation of specialised Communities of Practice (CoP)s Develop a framework that encourages process innovation, early involvement of contractors and integrated project delivery Conduct pilot projects using the new framework. Refine the framework and establish a strategy for its market-wide adoption Mandate the use of the new regulatory framework Develop the development of the first set of guides, protocols and mandates that facilitate BIM adoption across the market Establish a list of noteworthy publications to be developed Develop or coordinate the development of a set of standards that regulate the quality of project deliverables across the supply chain Develop a competency inventory, educational framework, and learning modules. Conduct awareness sessions across the supply chain Develop learning modules for tertiary, vocational, and professional settings. Encourage the development of e-learning material covering all disciplines and roles. Educate the educators. Develop metrics for assessing and prequalifying the capability of organizations and the competency of individuals Develop a market-wide benchmark for project performance. Develop a performance pre-qualification framework Establish a market pre-qualification register Develop a protocol for standardized components Generate standardized components for most- used architectural, structural and mechanical elements. Develop a protocol for min hardware specifications Develop a protocol for common data environments (for exchanging files and data) Develop a protocol for a whole life-cycle, integrated-data environment (covering all documents, models and data) Sample BIM Roadmap v0.2
  46. 46. Macro BIM Adoption sample Policy Development Plan
  47. 47. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 47OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM the Policy Development Plan – in three phases: 1st Phase: INITIATION of Task Group + Framework 2nd Phase: CONSULTATION with industry 3rd Phase: EXECUTION of framework through a roadmap
  48. 48. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 48OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM 1st Phase: INITIATION A. Establish a Task Group1 based on a clear Vision of what needs to be accomplished 1. Develop a clear Task Group Mandate with a limited set of activities 2. Identify Task Group Resources at its disposal to deliver the mandate 1 The task of establishing the Seed Task Group falls upon the ‘volunteer champion’ or the ‘designated driver’. The champion is moved by a vision (of excellence), while the Driver is moved by a government dictate or as a response to higher-level change agenda or framework. This is a partial and generic sample of a phased BIM policy development plan. It will need to be extended and customized to meet the requirements of each market. B. Task Group to develop a seed BIM Policy Framework based on Model B 1. Investigate Similar Worldwide Policy Efforts within and outside the construction industry 2. Identify a Policy Approach to Adapt based on market similarity, local culture and resources 3. Identify the market’s Diffusion Dynamics based on Model C 4. Decide on the Policy Approach based on Model D C. Initiate an Online Presence for sharing Task Group activities (e.g. a website)
  49. 49. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 49OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM A. Engage with Stakeholders as per Model E 1. Conduct Presentations to communicate the Vision/Framework and capture feedback 2. Identify Champions for the Execution Phase 3. Review and Calibrate the BIM Policy Framework 2nd Phase: CONSULTATION This is a partial and generic sample of a phased BIM policy development plan. It will need to be extended and customized to meet the requirements of each market. *For each identified Policy Deliverable, decide whether to Adopt Existing2 (e.g. an international standard), Adapt Existing (tailor to market requirements), or Develop New Policy Deliverable C. Publish Roadmap (with a view to update it on a cyclical basis) B. Develop a BIM Policy Roadmap for implementing the framework (refer to sample): 1. Identify Key Dates and intermediary Milestones 2. Identify Policy Deliverables* and link each to Milestones (e.g. develop an Education Framework by Feb 1, 20xx) 3. Identify the Stakeholder Group to Lead, Support or Participate in each Policy Deliverable refer to Diffusion-Role Matrix
  50. 50. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 50OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM 3rd Phase: EXECUTION A. Initiate Pilot Programmes to test Policy Deliverables (e.g. conduct a pilot project) This is a partial and generic sample of a phased BIM policy development plan. It will need to be extended and customized to meet the requirements of each market. E. Develop a Certification and/or Accreditation Programme D. Develop Educational Programmes, Competency Inventories, etc. C. Develop BIM Guides, Protocols and Mandates (refer to Knowledge Content Taxonomy) – examples: 1. A Model Contract to enables model-based Collaboration and network-based Integration 2. Develop a BIM-centric Procurement Guide B. Encourage or Incentivise Stakeholder Groups to adopt the BIM policy
  51. 51. Summary Thoughts and Reflections
  52. 52. Dr. Bilal Succar | Milan | April 20, 2016 Slide 52OICE INTERNATIONAL FORUM ON BIM THANK YOU BIM Framework @bimexcellence Professional profile @bsuccarBIM ThinkSpace BIM Framework research blogindustry blog videos company website assessment platform largest BIM Dictionary

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