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Interactive Journalism - StoryDesign - Story First

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Session 2: Story First
How do you craft interactive experience when you're a journalist? You should think "Story First" and use a better narrative structure than the inverted pyramid to engage people.

You can find more on the "Interactive Journalism (IJ)" publication on Medium here: https://medium.com/interactive-journalism/latest

This series of Slides is part of the Storydesign.fr, an effort to inject design thinking into the editorial process. © Gerald Holubowicz

Published in: Education
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Interactive Journalism - StoryDesign - Story First

  1. 1. INTERACTIVE JOURNALISM CRAFTING FOR IMMERSIVE NEWS EXPERIENCES STORY FIRST @gholubowicz storydesign.fr | geraldholubowi.cz
  2. 2. - I - TIME TO SHARE 2
  3. 3. HOW I GET MY NEWS ? 3
  4. 4. 4 THE GUARDIAN/AJ+/LE MONDE WHEN I WAKE UP and I’m still too lazy to move
  5. 5. THEN, RADIO FOR BREAKFAST mostly France Inter for fresh news & interviews 5
  6. 6. A LOT OF TWITTER on my way to the office 6
  7. 7. OR/AND A LOT OF FACEBOOK when I’m in the metro 7
  8. 8. 8
  9. 9. EVERYTHING ON MOBILE easier to read at any moment 9
  10. 10. 10 FEEDLY AT THE OFFICE
  11. 11. 30011 that’s the number of RSS feed I subscribed to…
  12. 12. 12
  13. 13. 13 GAMING NEWS FOR LUNCH coz it’s fun!
  14. 14. AGAIN, A LOT OF TWITTER because I’m an addict 14
  15. 15. OR/AND A LOT OF FACEBOOK can’t help it… 15
  16. 16. FEEDLY AGAIN ON IPAD easier to read and I can’t read everything at the office
  17. 17. 17
  18. 18. 18 TV NEWS AT SOME POINT DURING THE EVENING
  19. 19. OVERVIEW 19 In the U.S and Europe
  20. 20. 20
  21. 21. 21
  22. 22. 22
  23. 23. - II - LECTURE 23 From ideation to structure: a basic workflow to start scripting interactive journalism experiences
  24. 24. WHAT IS A STORY? 24
  25. 25. 25 FOR A JOURNALIST, 
 A STORY IS:
 
 WHO, WHAT, WHEN, WHERE, WHY AND HOW
  26. 26. 26 FOR THE REST OF THE WORLD, 
 A STORY IS:
 
 BEGINNING, MIDDLE, END
  27. 27. TELLING A STORY IMPLIES THAT WE USE A COMMON LANGUAGE WITH OUR AUDIENCE 27
  28. 28. THE EFFECT OF A STORY 28
  29. 29. 29
  30. 30. 30 “STORYTELLING REVEALS MEANING WITHOUT COMMITTING THE ERROR OF DEFINING IT.” Hannah  Arendt,  Political  theorist  &  philosopher
  31. 31. 31 “NARRATIVE IS RELATED TO THE IDEA OF CONTEXT. NO MATTER HOW COMPLETE OR COMPREHENSIVE A NARRATIVE APPEARS.” David  Campbell,  Professor  at  the  Colgate  University,  New  York  
  32. 32. THE STORY OF STORY From Gilgamesh to Vogler 32
  33. 33. THE EPIC OF GILGAMESH 33
  34. 34. THE POETICS by ARISTOTLE 34
  35. 35. 35
  36. 36. THE HERO’S
 JOURNEY by JOSEPH CAMPBELL 36
  37. 37. THE WRITER’S
 JOURNEY by CHRIS VOGLER 38
  38. 38. 39
  39. 39. INTERACTIVE JOURNALISM Type of New Formats 40
  40. 40. INTERACTIVE FORMATS • INTERACTIVE DOCUMENTARY • LONG-FORM • SERIOUS GAME • PARTICIPATIVE EXPERIENCE • And more… 41
  41. 41. NON LINEAR STORY STRUCTURE A panorama of the different structures used in interactive documentaries. 42
  42. 42. LINEAR STRUCTURE The most classical way to tell a story. Examples: Bucarest Below Ground – Le Corps Incarcéré – 127 Rue de la Garenne + : Easy to create, easy to use, that’s the traditional way to structure a story (chapters, pages etc) . You can easily control the narrative arc. Info overload (difference between nb of stories available and stories actually seen) is null. - : No interaction, little engagement, every users haas the same XP (experience) 43
  43. 43. DYNAMIC OBJECT STRUCTURE Very common structure for interactive documentaries. The user enter the story by a hub of “objects” (map, list, mosaïc). Not for fiction Examples: The iron curtains – Behind the Veil + : Apparent simplicity, Liberty, possibility to aggregate non-homogenous pieces of content . - : Risk to loose the intention of the author, Info Overload very high, the user can feel lost in front of these multiple choices. 44
  44. 44. FISHBONE STRUCTURE A very well known structure in interactive documentaries, that the used by ”Prison Valley”. A mix between linear and non-linear structure that allows to visit additional content. Examples: Pine Point – Prison Valley – The Defector + : Strong narrative structure, good interactivity, the user can see all the content, the author is “safe”. - : Can be deceptive because if the story stands alone, why should see other contents? Info Overload moderate, be carefull not to create more than 2 levels of content. 45
  45. 45. BRANCHING STRUCTURE The story gives different choices to the user (2 or more), at certain points of the story, the user has to decide whether he takes left or right and that decision will shape the rest of his/her XP Examples: Journey to the end of coal + : Interactivity very high, lots of choices, true sensation of liberty, Info Overload low, the user is engaged with the choices he/she makes. - : High cost of production (lots of choices), a part of the story won’t be seen by the user, necessity to think about different type of scenario 46
  46. 46. PARALLEL PATHS STRUCTURE Branching story organized around gathering points, the user has to go through these points. Examples: Jour de Vote – 6 million dead + : Interactivity very high, lots of choices, liberty a bit more limited but the feeling is still here, cost of production moderate, engagement is pretty high due to good interactivity - : Can be deceptive for those who expect a true freedom 47
  47. 47. THREADED STRUCTURE The story is narrated from different perspectives. It is a parallel story structure but with different characters in which different stories are crossing each others. Examples: Inside Disaster Haïti - Amour + : Good User experience, different stories can be experienced. The user can jump from node to node as he/she wishes. - : Info Overload can be high, very risky to loose the user. The links between stories can be complicated. Complexity at the production level. 48
  48. 48. WORKFLOW 49
  49. 49. TRELLO using troll as a project management tool to control your workflow. 50
  50. 50. - III - GROUP SESSION 51
  51. 51. 52
  52. 52. - IV - ASSIGNMENT 53 Blog post 2: Interview an interactive storyteller to discover its “secret sauce”, what makes him interesting?

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