Georgia

Department of defense

2013

annual report
contents
Letter from the TAG					

3 78th Troop Command 				

18

4 Georgia Air National Guard 			

19

Chain of Command		...
Georgia State Defense Force 			

27 Language Training Center 				

41

Joint Staff						 29 Educational Opportunities 				...
State of Georgia
Department of Defense
OFFICE OF THE ADJUTANT GENERAL
1000 Halsey Ave. Building 447
Marietta, GA 30060

I
...
Mission:

The Georgia Department of Defense provides
ready and relevant military forces to the Combatant
Commanders, and w...
Ga. DoD Chain of Command
Governor
Nathan Deal
Commander-in-Chief

Maj. Gen.
Jim Butterworth
Adjutant General

Brig. Gen. J...
2013 Annual Report | 6
Economic Impact

T

from our Guardsmen and civilians
employed by the GaDoD. With
a federal budget of $680 million
and stat...
$680MILLION
Federal funds brought into the state of Georgia

$9 million:

Amount Georgia
funds the Guard

144 million

11,...
2013
Timeline

National Guard Red Horse Civil
Engineers from New Mexico
operate heavy equipment across
the wide expanse of...
Guardsmen of the Georgia
Army and Air National Guard
joined forces with the Army
Reserve’s
310th
Tactical
Psychological
Op...
Georgia Army National Guard
A Soldier from Georgia’s 560th Battle Field
Surveillance Brigade (BFSB) pushes off a UH-60
Bla...
The GAARNG was selected as the
2013 Army Community of Excellence
winner from among its 53 peers.
The award recognizes cont...
48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team

Col. Randall Simmons
Commander
48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team
Georgia Army National ...
78th Aviation Troop Command
Home-stationed at Clay National
Guard Center in marietta, the 78th Aviation
Troop Command (ATC...
648th Maneuver Enhancement
Brigade

Colonel R. Scott Carter
Commander

648th Maneuver Enhancement Brigade

Georgia Army Na...
560th Battlefield
Surveillance
Brigade
The Georgia Army National Guard’s
560th Battlefield Sur veillance Brigade
(BFSB) is...
201st Regional Support Group

Col. Vernon Atkinson
Commander
201st Regional Support Group
Georgia Army National Guard

cap...
78th Troop
Command
Commanded by Brig. Gen. Craig
McGalliard since Oct. 1, 2013, the
78th Troop Command’s mission is
to com...
Georgia Air National Guard
Guardsmen of the Georgia Army and Air National
Guard joined forces with the Army Reserve’s
310t...
M aj . G en . T homas R. M oore

Commander
Georgia Air National Guard

T

he Georgia Air National Guard
is always committe...
116th Air Control Wing

Col. Kevin D. Clotfelter
Commander
116th Airlift Wing

With nearly 11 years of continuous
deployme...
165th Airlift Wing

Georgia’s 165th Airlift Wing is
located at Savannah International
Airport and is composed of more than...
117th Air
Control Squadron
Control of the highly charged
and congested airspace over a given
combat zone is the responsibi...
224th Joint
Communications

Squadron
The 224th Joint Communications
Support Squadron (JCSS) provides
communications suppor...
139th
Intelligence
Squadron
The primary mission of the
139th Intelligence Squadron (IS) is
to execute cryptologic intellig...
530th Air Force Band
The 530th Air Force Band (also
known as the Air National Guard Band of
the South) support global Air ...
Georgia State Defense Force

Brig. General Tom
Commanding General

Danielson

Georgia State Defense Force

When ordered by...
Members of the Georgia State Defense Force
(GSDF) unload a simulated casualty during a
medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) traini...
Joint Staff

Brig. General John King
Director

Joint Staff

Division, Strategic Management
Office, and the State Partnersh...
1st Lt. Monicia Porter, a native of Thomasville, Ga., with the 1230th
Transportation Company in support of the 524th Comba...
Defense
Support of Civil
Authorities
The Georgia Department
of Defense is always ready to
provide support to the Georgia
E...
78th Homeland Response Force participates in training
exercises during Vigilant Guard 2013.

2013 Annual Report | 32
4th WMD Civil
Support Team

T

he 22 personnel of the
4th Weapons of Mass
D e st r u c t i on ( W M D )
C i v i l S u p p ...
Staff Sgt. Natasha Daniels swept 4th
CST entry team Guardsmen with a
pancake radiation detector for any
traces of contamin...
Counterdrug
Task Force

The Georgia National
Guard C ounterdrug Task Force
(GANGCDTF) conducts full
spectrum law enforceme...
Public Affairs

T h e G e or g i a D e p a r t m e nt
of Defense Public Affairs Office
supp or ts t he 15,000 memb er
orga...
Emerging
Missions
Na t i o n a l G u a r d s m e n h a v e
a unique blend of civilian and
military skills. It is this dual...
State Partnership
Program with the
Country of Georgia
The State Partnership Program’s
purpose is to establish enduring civ...
2013 Georgia Department of Defense Annual Report
2013 Georgia Department of Defense Annual Report
2013 Georgia Department of Defense Annual Report
2013 Georgia Department of Defense Annual Report
2013 Georgia Department of Defense Annual Report
2013 Georgia Department of Defense Annual Report
2013 Georgia Department of Defense Annual Report
2013 Georgia Department of Defense Annual Report
2013 Georgia Department of Defense Annual Report
2013 Georgia Department of Defense Annual Report
2013 Georgia Department of Defense Annual Report
2013 Georgia Department of Defense Annual Report
2013 Georgia Department of Defense Annual Report
2013 Georgia Department of Defense Annual Report
2013 Georgia Department of Defense Annual Report
2013 Georgia Department of Defense Annual Report
2013 Georgia Department of Defense Annual Report
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2013 Georgia Department of Defense Annual Report

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2013 Georgia Department of Defense Annual Report

  1. 1. Georgia Department of defense 2013 annual report
  2. 2. contents Letter from the TAG 3 78th Troop Command 18 4 Georgia Air National Guard 19 Chain of Command 5 116th Air Control Wing 21 Joint Stationing Map 6 165th Airlift Wing 22 Mission Statement Economic Impact 7 117th Air Control Squadron 23 2013 Timeline 9 165th Air Support Operations Squadron 23 11 224th Joint Communications Squadron 24 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team 13 283rd Combat Communications Squadron 24 78th Aviation Troop Command 14 139th Intelligence Squadron 25 648th Maneuver Enhancement Brigade 15 202nd Engineering Installation Squadron 25 560th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade 16 530th Air Force Band 26 201st Regional Support Group 17 Combat Readiness Training Center 26 Georgia Army National Guard 1 | Georgia Department of Defense
  3. 3. Georgia State Defense Force 27 Language Training Center 41 Joint Staff 29 Educational Opportunities 42 Defense Support of Civil Authorities 31 Georgia Military College 42 4th CMD Support Team 33 University of North Georgia 42 Counterdrug Task Force 35 The Georgia Guard As A Business 43 Public Affairs 36 Georgia Guard Diversity/Breakdown 44 Emerging Missions 37 Historical Roots 45 Agribusiness Development Teams 37 Georgia’s TAG Lineage State Partnership with Nation of Georgia 38 A Global Presence 47 Youth ChalleNGe Academy 39 Soldiers Killed In Service Since 9/11 48 STARBASE 41 Officers of the Georgia Army Guard 49 122nd Regional Training Institute 53 41 Officers of the Georgia Air Guard 46 2013 Annual Report | 2
  4. 4. State of Georgia Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE ADJUTANT GENERAL 1000 Halsey Ave. Building 447 Marietta, GA 30060 I t is with great pride that I present you with this Annual Report outlining the accomplishments of the Georgia Department of Defense for 2013. This report reflects the outstanding support and capabilities that our more than 15,000 men and women bring to the global war fight and right here in our great state of Georgia. Over the course of 2013, the Georgia Department of Defense conducted numerous operations and received accolades indicative of our quality organization and outstanding personnel. The Army Chief of Staff selected the Georgia Army National Guard as the National Guard 2013 Army Communities of Excellence winner based upon our best business practices. Globally, we continued to provide ready units to the war fight. Within the United States, our units have provided personnel and equipment capabilities in support of protecting our southern borders against both illegal immigration and drugs. Here in Georgia, your National Guard service members have continued to fight the war on drugs alongside local and state law enforcement agencies through counterdrug operations. It is indeed humbling to lead such great Georgians as they accomplish numerous and varied missions all around the world time and time again. As we face an uncertain federal military budget in the coming years, the Georgia Department of Defense will also face challenges maintaining operational readiness, force structure and mission sets as we compete with the active component and reserves to remain relevant. Over the course of the War on Terrorism, the National Guard and specifically the Georgia National Guard have successfully evolved from a strategic force to an operational force. We must be vigilant and ensure we do not lose the progress we have fought so hard to achieve. Now more than ever, we need you, our fellow Georgians, to show your active support for the Georgia Department of Defense and enable us to be ready when called upon. The Soldiers, Airmen, State Defense Force members, and state employees of the Georgia Department of Defense remain a ready and relevant force that has proven to be integral to our country’s global and domestic operations. As evidenced by the operations carried out over the past year by our well trained and dedicated personnel, your Georgia Department of Defense has answered the call of both its nation and state and is well postured to do so when asked again. The citizens of Georgia can take comfort and pride in knowing its Georgia National Guard is Always Ready, Always There and Always on Target – that is YOUR Georgia National Guard! Sincerely, James Butterworth Maj. Gen. Jim Butterworth The Adjutant General of Georgia 3 | Georgia Department of Defense
  5. 5. Mission: The Georgia Department of Defense provides ready and relevant military forces to the Combatant Commanders, and with the consent of the Governor provides command and control, and capabilities to support Homeland Defense and Defense Support to Civil Authorities. Vision: A strong and growing joint military organization, recognized as a leader in strength, readiness, and innovation; an interagency partner and leader; postured for effective response; chosen for new missions and force structure, that provides opportunities for members who live the Ga. DoD values to realize their potential through service to the State and Nation. Values: • • • • • Integrity First Service before Self Initiative Teamwork Continuous Improvement Priorities: • Defend the Homeland • Support the War-Fighter • Continuously Transform the Force Goals: • To care for our members and their families • To be accountable and have the highest of integrity • To tell the story of the great work Georgia National Guardsmen do every day • To enhance existing and develop new partnerships with our host communities • To stay prepared and shape the future through continuous improvement Focus: • • • • Ready Units, Soldiers, Airmen, and Families Competent, Adaptive, Learning Leaders Seamless Connectivity to All Leaders Balanced Contributions from Army and Air Service Components • High Quality of Life for our Soldiers, Airmen and Families 2013 Annual Report | 4
  6. 6. Ga. DoD Chain of Command Governor Nathan Deal Commander-in-Chief Maj. Gen. Jim Butterworth Adjutant General Brig. Gen. Joe Jarrard Asst. Adjutant General - Army Commander Ga. Army National Guard President of the United States National Guard Bureau Maj. Gen. Tom Moore Commander Ga. Air National Guard Organization Composition 11,152 Army Guardsmen Mr. Russel Carlson Deputy Adjutant General Ga. Dept. of Defense Brig Gen. John King Director Joint Staff Brig. Gen. Tom Danielson Commanding General Ga. State Defense Force 74% 2737 Air Guardsmen 670 SDF Members 18% 536 State Employees 5 | Georgia Department of Defense 3.5% 4.5%
  7. 7. 2013 Annual Report | 6
  8. 8. Economic Impact T from our Guardsmen and civilians employed by the GaDoD. With a federal budget of $680 million and state budget of $9 million, the Georgia Department of Defense also produces lasting results in the state with flourishing youth programs, an outstanding military readiness capability, and ingenuity in military construction programs – which at present are injecting more than $57 million into the Georgia economy. Despite our large presence in the state, the Georgia Department of Defense and its operations account for only .001 percent of the state budget in 2014 – just $9 million. Overall, the Georgia Department of Defense annually injects more than a billion dollars worth of money into the Georgia making it a vital part of our thriving economy. This is accomplished through payroll, logistics, maintenance and service contracts, construction and many other ways. As such, the Georgia Department of Defense is one of the largest employers in Georgia and significantly impacts our economy. Additionally, the fact that 150 of the 159 counties either have a National Guard armory or are immediately adjacent to a county with one, demonstrates our statewide economic presence and impact. While our economic impact in Georgia is significant, the most important asset we have is our service members. The Georgia Department of Defense service members are not just the protectors of your communities; we are your brothers and sisters, your neighbors and friends. In times of peace, we live side-by-side by with you, working to make this state great. And in times of war and peril, know that your Georgia Department of Defense will answer the call as we are always ready, always there, always on target! 13,889 he motto for the Georgia Department of Defense reads “always ready, always there, always on target!” That statement paints a highly accurate portrait of what this organization offers the state of Georgia and the nation. In meeting the requirement to provide ready and relevant forces to the combatant commanders and homeland defense and defense support to civil authorities, the Georgia Army and Air National Guard have a significant economic impact upon the economy of the state of Georgia. With a 15 percent increase in personnel since 2005, more than 15,000 men and women make up the Georgia Department of Defense, hailing from each of the 159 counties across the Peach State – making our service members and civilian staff truly “home grown.” In payroll tax alone, the state collects more than $25 million Georgia Guardsmen $2,292,941 in state funds saved by State Defense Force utilization 7 | Georgia Department of Defense
  9. 9. $680MILLION Federal funds brought into the state of Georgia $9 million: Amount Georgia funds the Guard 144 million 11,652 YCA Graduates in drug related seizures In addition to having Guardsmen in every Georgia town, the Georgia Guard also has a unit based in 55 of Georgia’s counties. $25 million in state income tax from Guard’s Federal payroll. $61 million in military construction. More than 16,500 Georgia Guardsmen have deployed since 9/11/2001 1,693 deployed in 2013 2013 Annual Report | 8
  10. 10. 2013 Timeline National Guard Red Horse Civil Engineers from New Mexico operate heavy equipment across the wide expanse of the Remagen DZ at Fort Stewart, GA, bringing the vital assault landing strip back to life. Lt. Col. Charles Drown, left, medical element commander with the 165th Medical Group, and Capt. Christal Lavelle a physicians assistant with the 116th Medical Group, Georgia Air National Guard, cover a simulated patient with an aluminum warming blanket during the Vigilant Guard 2013 exercise at Camp Blanding, Fla., May 21, 2013. Lawmakers honor Ga. Guardsmen at the Capitol Feb. 22, 2012 – Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle presents a resolution honoring the Georgia Guard on the floor of the State Senate. Georgia National Guard leadership gather to honor the fallen at Marietta National Cemetery. Jan. | | | | Feb. | | | | March | | | | April | | | | May | | | | June | | | | U.S. Air Force Gen. Mike Hostage, commander, Air Combat Command, presents the Purple Heart Medal to Air National Guard Tech. Sgt. Barry Duffield, 116th Civil Engineering Squadron, Explosive Ordnance Disposal Flight team leader, during a ceremony at Robins Air Force Base, Ga., Jan. 7, 2013 The Georgia Agribusiness Development Team II (ADT II) returned home from their 10-month deployment to Afghanistan with friends and family filling the 265th Regional Support Group National Guard armory. U.S. Army Spc. Donnie Kessler, a pathfinder instructor, with the 356th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade, of the Georgia Army National Guard, gives a class on basic pathfinder skills to soldiers from Cameroon and the Gabonese Republic. The soldiers were participating in Central Accord 2013, a joint exercise in which U.S., Cameroon and neighboring Central African militaries partner to promote regional cooperation and increase aerial resupply and medical readiness capacity. Starting line for the Some Gave All 5K held in Lula, Ga. - and run the same day by 648th MEB Soldiers in Kabul - in memory of Maj. Kevin Jenrette who was killed in action June 4, 2009 while deployed with the 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team. 9 | Georgia Department of Defense
  11. 11. Guardsmen of the Georgia Army and Air National Guard joined forces with the Army Reserve’s 310th Tactical Psychological Operations Company (Airborne) in a jump training exercise. Soldiers from the Ga. National Guard were from C-Troop (LRS) 3-108th CAV. the 165th Air Wing from Savannah flew the C-130 aircraft. The Ga NG Counter Drug Task Force will be featured on CBS Atlanta’s 11:00 news tonight! Watch as they support local sherrifs with drug eradication. Members of the 128th Airborne Command and Control Squadron received water survival training at Lake Tobesofkee today. It was the first time the 128th (part of the 116th Air Control Wing/ JSTARS) received hands-on water survival training from the Army Guard. Soldiers of the 648th MEB learn the history of the Korean War at the 2nd Infantry Division Museum during Warpath III the largest exercise on the Korean Peninsula since 1953. July | | | | Aug. | | | | Sept. | | | | Oct. | | | | Nov. | | | | Dec. | | | | Hundreds of members of Forsyth County welcomed the more than 300 Georgia Guardsmen of the 560th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade (BFSB) to the community at a ceremony marking the dedication of the Cumming Regional Readiness Center. Nine female Georgia Guardsmen have been selected to integrate into combat related positions that were formerly all male. Lieutenant Governor Casey Cagle; Maj. Gen. Jim Butterworth, Adjutant General, Georgia National Guard; as well as the oldest and youngest attendees of the Guard birthday celebration, cut the cake for the birthday reception. The was cut and served as the culminating event for a day of activities marking the National Guard’s 377th birthday. The Georgia National Guard 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team set high marks for the eXportable Combat Training Capability (XCTC) program to provide Soldiers with an experience similar to combat missions overseas. 2013 Annual Report | 10
  12. 12. Georgia Army National Guard A Soldier from Georgia’s 560th Battle Field Surveillance Brigade (BFSB) pushes off a UH-60 Blackhawk for his first jump of the day. 11 | Georgia Department of Defense
  13. 13. The GAARNG was selected as the 2013 Army Community of Excellence winner from among its 53 peers. The award recognizes continuous bu s i n e s s pro c e s s i mprov e m e nt ; individual innovation; groundbreaking initiatives; and dedication to efficiency, effectiveness, and customer care. These efforts directly affect the quality of support to Soldiers, Families, civilian employees, and retirees who work, live, train and rely on our organization. The GAARNG is organized into six major subordinate commands (MSCs): the 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team in Macon; the 560th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade in Cumming; the 648th Maneuver Enhancement rig en oe arrard Brigade at Fort Benning; the 78th Troop Georgia’s Asst. Adjutant General - Army Command, 201st Regional Support Commander - Georgia Army National Guard Group / Region 4 Homeland Response Force, and 78th Aviation Tro op Command at the Clay National Guard he Georgia Army Center in Marietta. National Guard The organization’s mission is to (GAARNG) consists provide well trained and motivated of more than 11,100 forces to the Governor and Combatant Citizen-Soldiers Commanders in order to support unified training in more than land operations – offensive, defensive, 57 hometown armories and regional stability and civil support. In 2013, the facilities across the state. Georgia’s Army GAARNG surpassed all federal and state Guard has the eighth largest authorized requirements to include the deployment end strength allocation in the nation, and redeployment of more than 1,400 comprised of combat, protection and Soldiers, representing all six major sustainment units. subordinate commands to Afghanistan, Benin, Burundi, Cameroon, Canada, El Salvador, the Country of Georgia, Germany, Korea and Uganda. In addition to overseas operations, the GA National Guard Counter Drug Task Force continues to perform as one of the most successful Counter Drug Task Forces in the country assisting in over $144 million in drug related seizures and the apprehension of 1,185 drug related suspects. The GAARNG also provided key aviation support to the Office of Homeland Security on our nation’s southwest border to safeguard our citizens. The GAARNG’s four strategic priorities ensure continued preparedness to meet all missions: quality strength; ommand gt a j logistics excellence; preeminent facilities; hillip t r i n g f i e l d and continuous improvement. Relative to State Command Sergeant Major quality strength, the GAARNG finished Georgia Army National Guard B .G .J J T C P S S . M . as one of the best in recruiting for FY13 nationally, enlisting more than 1,815 quality recruits and officer candidates. The GAARNG’s logistics excellence efforts are preparing the state to lead the nation in the National Guard Bureau Command Logistics Review Team (CLRT) evaluation in March 2014. The road to success involved a year of internal inspections including C ommand Supply Discipline Program evaluations conducted on each MSC during the 2nd quarter. In addition, numerous Supply & Maintenance Instruction Team visits were conducted during the 3rd & 4th quarter combined with more than 70 field logisticians trained by G4 subject matter experts in our Logistics Survival Course. In support of the GARNG’s third strategic priority of preeminent facilities, the organization is in the process of executing four military construction projects in 2013 totaling $53,000,000 in federal funding matched with $4,000,000 in state funds. Additionally, the Construction Facilities Management Office executed 17 minor construction projects that included eight existing facility renovations and four site improvements totaling $9,000,000 in federal funding and $3,000,000 in state matching funds. C ont i nu ou s i mprov e m e nt i s the hallmark of the GAARNG and its personnel. To complement this effort, the GAARNG’s 122nd Regional Training Institute and Region Training Site-Maintenance achieved the highest rating of accreditation from TRADOC (Training and Doctrine Command) and CASCOM (C ombined Arms Support Command) as an “Institution of Excellence.” It is a multi-state institute for Active Duty, Army Reserve, and National Guard Soldiers in Military Intelligence, Signal, Infantry, Military Police, Transportation, and Ordnance training in addition to offering Officer Candidate leadership training. These accomplishments set the condit ions for t he GAARNG to continually be in a position of strength for increased federal and state funding, future force structure, and full-time manning. 2013 Annual Report | 12
  14. 14. 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team Col. Randall Simmons Commander 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team Georgia Army National Guard The 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (IBCT), headquartered in Macon, is made up of more than 3,500 Citizen Soldiers who operate out of 26 hometown armories throughout the state. The 48th IBCT is organized into six subordinate battalions: the 1st Squadron, 108th Cavalry (CAV) (Reconnaissance, Sur veillance, and Target Acquisition (RSTA)); 1st Battalion, 121st Infantry (IN) Regiment; 2nd Battalion, 121st IN Regiment; 1st Battalion, 118th Field Artillery (FA) Regiment; 148th Brigade Support Battalion (BSB); and the 48th Brigade Special Troops Battalion (BSTB). The 48th IBCT is trained and ready to enter its available year for worldwide deployments or defense of the homeland as a cohesive, well disciplined, well trained and lethal team of teams, of which is “The Brigade” of choice for the unified land operations. The 48th IBCT spent most of 2013 preparing for future overseas deployments in 2014. The Brigade’s culminating training event for 2013 was the Exportable Combat Training Capability exercise #13-06 (XCTC) at Fortt Stewart, Ga. The 48th IBCT Headquarters and select units will deploy in 2014 to Afghanistan to conduct a variety of training and security missions as the United States hands over security operations to the government of Afghanistan. Additionally, the 48th IBCT was the first ARNG unit selected to support the Department of Defense’s regionallyaligned forces mission and will deploy select units to Central America to advise and train partner nation militaries. The 1-108th CAV “Roughriders” spent the past year training and executing cavalry operations in support of the 48th IBCT. The 1-108th successfully completed all gunnery requirements ensuring Troops A and B met the milestones for a culmination combined arms live fire exercise (LFX). Troop C qualified on all assigned weapon systems and executed a dismounted scout team combined arms live fire exercise which included supporting fires from their snipers and mortar section. The 1-108th snipers ran the 48th IBCT “SniperX” to provide sniper sustainment training for all brigade sniper teams. The 1-121st IN “Spartans” focused on offensive unified land operations. The Spartans started the year with Soldier readiness processing and individual skills training and shifted to company level forceon-force operations in February when two rifle companies conducted attacks, with one company in the defense as an opposing force. Battalion and company mortars maintained proficiency through integration into attack/ defense operations. The 2-121st IN “Warriors” focused on the validation of each maneuver element and specialty/staff section with a focus on offensive unified land operations. The Warriors conducted Soldier and family readiness activities, individual and team to squad level re-validation, and the validation of the battalion staff throughout the year. The 1-118th FA “Old Hickory” set the standard for indirect-fire training during XCTC 13-06, where the battalion processed 109 fire missions, fired 2,276 high explosive, white phosphor us, and illumination rounds, and conducted 46 reconnaissance, selection, and occupation of position (RSOP) operations without incident. External evaluators certified both of the battalion’s firing batteries at the culmination of the training. The unit orchestrated the company combined arms live fire lanes by integrating fires from close air support (CAS), 105mm Artillery, and mortars from the brigade’s maneuver battalions. Upon completion of XCTC 13-06, the unit demonstrated that it had refined and perfected the field artillery mission to deliver fires for the Brigade. T h e 1 4 8 t h B SB, “ Wi s h m a s t e r s”, coordinated and conducted three brigade level training events during 2013. Operation “Sharp Scalpel” started off the year by improving the medical proficiency of brigade medics. Gunnery training was conducted in April and a brigade logistics exercise was conducted in May, which facilitated logistics-focused training for all six battalion logistics sections and four forward support companies. The 48th BSTB “Strykers” built upon combat support focused weekend training and integrated its key enablers into the maneuver battalions within the brigade. The battalion’s training focus was mission command, sustainment and mobility operations. Stryker conducted weapons qualifications, demolition and obstacle emplacement training, command post operations, and increased intelligence c o l l e c t i o n a n d a n a l y s i s o p e r at i o n s throughout the year. 48th IBCT Units • 1st Squadron, 108th Cavalry, of Calhoun • 1st Battalion, 121st Infantry Regiment, of Winder • 2nd Battalion, 121st Infantry Regiment, of Forsyth • 1st Battalion, 118th Field Artillery Regiment, of Savannah • 148th Brigade Support Battalion, of Macon • 48th Brigade Special Troops Battalion, of Statesboro 13 | Georgia Department of Defense
  15. 15. 78th Aviation Troop Command Home-stationed at Clay National Guard Center in marietta, the 78th Aviation Troop Command (ATC) is the aviation arm of the Georgia Army National Guard, commanded by Colonel Brock Gaston, with Command Sergeant Major Timothy Jones as his senior enlisted leader. The mission of its 650 pilots, aircrew, maintenance and support personnel is to mobilize and deploy aviation forces in order to provide command and control, counter-drug, air movement, medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) and air assault (AASLT) support for combat operations worldwide and defense support of civil authority operations during state and national emergencies. With the same operational and training requirements as active aviation components, the command maintains 42 rotary wing, fixed wing and unmanned aircraft systems to support all Georgia National Guard units, as well as supporting all services to include routine support to the 75th Ranger Regiment, the 4th and 5th Ranger Training Battalions and the Maneuver Center of Excellence based out of Fort Benning. During training year 2013, the 78th ATC executed more than 8,000 accident free flight hours encompassing multiple deployments and training exercises. Detachment 1, Company B, 1-169th Aviation kicked the year off when they were called upon by the National Guard Bureau to conduct relief operations in October 2012 in response to the devastation Hurricane Sandy wrought on the east coast of the United States. In early February, Company C(-), 1-169th Aviation returned home from Afghanistan, after executing over 300 MEDEVAC missions in support of Regional South Command West. In May, Georgia’s aviation command was called on again to conduct an 1,800 mile cross country mission to Canada, where three UH-60 Black Hawks, three HH-60 Black Hawks, two CH-47 Chinooks, and one C-26 Metroliner flew 560 hours while supporting Canadian ground forces’ pre-deployment combat training. The C-26 fixed wing detachment left home in July to conduct combat operations in support of Operation Enduring Freedom and in August two UH-60, two HH-60, and two CH-47 helicopters supported the 48th Infantry Brigade’s Exportable Combat Training Capabilities Exercise in preparation for their deployment to Afghanistan. Throughout the year, in conjunction with its primary counter drug mission, C (-), 2-151st Aviation was tasked to be a primary executor of ongoing Southwest Border Patrol Missions, using LUH-72 Lakotas. Col. Brock Gaston Commander 78th Aviation Troop Command Georgia Army National Guard 78th ATC Units • 78th Aviation Troop Command Headquarters, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • 1st General Support Aviation Battalion of the 171st Aviation Regiment, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • Company H, 171st Aviation Regiment, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • C Company, 2nd Aviation Security and Support Battalion of the 151st Aviation Regiment, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • B Company(-), 1st of the 169th General Support Aviation Battalion, Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah • C Company(-), 1st of the 169th General Support Aviation Battalion, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • C Company, 1st General Support Aviation Battalion of the 111th Aviation Regiment, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • Detachment 1, C Company, 1st Air Assault Battalion of the 185th Aviation Regiment, Winder • 935th Combat Service Support Battalion, Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah • Detachment 9, Operational Airlift Command, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • Detachment 1, B Company (UAS), 48th Brigade Special Troops Battalion, Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah • Army Aviation Support Facility No. 1, Winder Barrow Airport, Winder • Army Aviation Support Facility No. 2, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • Army Aviation Support Facility No. 3, Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah 2013 Annual Report | 14
  16. 16. 648th Maneuver Enhancement Brigade Colonel R. Scott Carter Commander 648th Maneuver Enhancement Brigade Georgia Army National Guard The current GA Army National Guard MEB force structure contains a brigade headquarters, three separate batt alions, and a s eparate signal company. The units of the 648th MEB are the 878th Engineer Battalion, headquartered in Augusta, GA; the 348th Brigade Support Battalion, headquartered in Ellenwood, GA; the 1-214th FA, headquartered in Elberton, GA; and the 620th Signal Company in Weston, WV. The MEB is a fully operational force, fully engaged in both its contingency (war) and peacetime missions. In Januar y 2013, the 878th Engineer Battalion and 848th Engineer Company mobilized to Fort Bliss, Texas, and deployed to Kandahar, Afghanistan, in order to conduct route-clearance operations and training and mentoring Afghan National S ecurity Forces 648th MEB Units The 648th Maneuver Enhancement Brigade (MEB) was activated on Oct. 1, 2007 in Columbus, GA and is now headquartered on Fort Benning. The unit has an assigned strength of over 1,600 Soldiers. The current brigade commander Colonel R. Scott Carter and his senior enlisted advisor, Command Sergeant Major John Rainwater took command in March 2013. The 648th MEB is a missiontailored force which conducts support area operations, maneuver support operations, consequence management, and stability operations in order to assure the mobility, protection, freedom of action to the supported force. MEBs are uniquely designed for both war fighting and operational support roles. Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Fort Benning, GA • 878th Engineer Battalion, Augusta, GA • Headquarters and Headquarters Company, Augusta, GA • Co A, 878th EN (Forward Support Company), Augusta, GA • 876th Engineer Company (Vertical Construction), Toccoa, GA • Detachment 1, 876th Engineer Company (Vertical Construction), Hartwell, GA • 810th Engineer Company (Sapper), Swainsboro, GA • 848th Engineer Company (Sapper), Douglas, GA • 874th Engineer Detachment (Construction), Fort Stewart, GA • 175th Engineer Detachment (Asphalt), Fort Stewart, GA 15 | Georgia Department of Defense in Route Clearance Operations. In addition, the 1st Battalion, 214th Field Artillery also deployed to Afghanistan where they were charged with conducting base defense operations and disrupting enemy forces in their area of responsibility. Training is key to the success of the MEB. In June 2013, staff members of Brigade Headquarters deployed to Fort Leavenworth, KS and embedded with the 301st MEB, an Army reserve unit to participate in a Division-level Warfighter Exercise. The MEB was also chosen to participate in the 2nd Infantry Division Warfighter exercise, one of the largest exercises ever conducted on the Korean Peninsula since the Korean War and will begin movement to South Korea in November 2013. The 648th “Team MEB” was a key participant as the Army validated its 2020 initiatives. • Headquarters Co. 348th BSB, Ellenwood, GA • Co A, 348th BSB, Ellenwood, GA • Co B, 348th BSB, Hinesville, GA • 1160th Transportation Company, Rome, GA • 620th Signal Company, (detached to WV ARNG) Weston, WV • 1st Battalion, 214th Field Artillery, Elberton, GA • Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 1-214th FA, Elberton, GA • Battery A, 1-214th, Winder, GA • Battery B, 1-214th FA, Thomson, GA • Battery C, 1-214th FA, Waynesboro, GA • 1214 Forward Support Company (FSC), 1-214th FA, Washington,GA
  17. 17. 560th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade The Georgia Army National Guard’s 560th Battlefield Sur veillance Brigade (BFSB) is commanded by Colonel Raymond Bossert and based at the Cumming Regional Readiness Center in Cumming. The brigade’s senior enlisted leader is Command Sergeant Major Roy Marchert. Since its inception on Oct. 1, 2007, the brigade’s mission is to provide command and control of reconnaissance, surveillance, and intelligence operations in support of a division, corps, or joint task force. The headquarters provides command, control and supervision of the tactical operations of the brigade and attached units, while the headquarters company provides unit administration and logistical support for the brigade staff sections. The 560th is authorized 1,109 Soldiers with which to carry out that mission. During 2013, the 560th BFSB relocated its he adqu ar ters f rom E l lenwo o d to Cumming. The relocation began in April 2013 and culminated in a ribbon cutting event at the newly constructed Cumming Regional Readiness Center (CRRC) in September. The event was attended by the Adjutant General, the Commanding General of the GAARNG, and several prominent members of the Cumming community. The CRRC is 100,000 square feet of space for training Georgia Guardsmen, featuring a theater style auditorium that seats 250 and a drill hall that can seat 400. The 560th BFSB carried out several significant and unique training events in 2013: In March 2013, elements of the 560th BFSB par ticipated in Op eration Ke y Resolve. Operation Key Resolve is an annual command post exercise that includes reception, staging, onward movement, and integration held by United States Forces Korea. It is conducted with Republic of Korea Forces and focuses on the United States Pacific Command Operations Plans that support the defense of South Korea. The 3/108th Cavalry and the 165th Quartermaster Company participated in Operation Central Accord in March 2013. Operation Central Accord is a multinational exercise in which US, Cameroon, and neighboring central African countries partner to promote regional cooperation while increasing aerial resupply and medical treatment capacity. The exercise was hosted by the Cameroon Defense Force and sponsored by United States Army Africa. Major focuses of the operation were parachute rigging, pathfinder operations, aerial resupply, casualty evacuation, field hospital operations, and first aid techniques. In June 2013, elements of the 221st MI Battalion deployed to Camp Williams, Utah to participate in the Panther Strike training exercise, which was an exercise designed specifically to reach military intelligence training requirements. This two-week exercise allowed military intelligence Soldiers within the 221st MI Battalion to train in realistic combat scenarios, sharpening their skills for future support of the war fight. Elements of the 560th BFSB participated in Operation Atlas Vision in July 2013 in Munich, Germany. Atlas Vision is a bilateral US – Russian ground forces exercise that consists of a battalion level command post, computer assisted exercise. Small elements of the 560th BFSB participated in Operation Beyond the Hor i z on i n E l S a l v a d or t o c on du c t comprehensive humanitarian civic assistance exercises. Soldiers specializing in engineering, construction, and health care provided service to communities while receiving valuable deployment training and building important relationships with partner nations. Supporting operations through the state partnership program, in July 2013, the 560th BFSB mobilized and deployed elements of various specialty skills to the Republic of Georgia. The Georgia Training Support Team (GTST) was deployed to provide functional area support to the U.S. Marine Corps’ Georgia Training Team Core and Rotational Mobile Training Teams. These teams had the mission of training Georgian infantry battalions to deploy in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. Over the course of the year, the 560th BFSB participated in numerous, but smaller overseas deployment training exercises and conducted multiple new equipment fieldings. Col. Ramond Bossert Commander 560th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade Georgia Army National Guard 560th BFSB Units • 3rd Squadron, 108th Cavalry, Atlanta, Marietta and Douglasville • 221st Military Intelligence Battalion, Gillem Enclave, Forest Park • 420th Network Signal Company, Cumming, GA • 230th Brigade Support Company, Cumming, GA • 165th Quartermaster Company (Light Air Drop Supply), Marietta • Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 560th Battlefield Surveillance Brigade, Cumming, GA 2013 Annual Report | 16
  18. 18. 201st Regional Support Group Col. Vernon Atkinson Commander 201st Regional Support Group Georgia Army National Guard capability to assist civil authorities in saving lives and mitigating suffering in response to a CBRN incident while continuing to provide trained and ready troops to support overseas contingency operations. The Region 4 HRF senior enlisted leader is Command Sgt. Maj. Melvin Farr. The HRF supported the Florida National Guard at Camp Blanding for Vigilant Guard 2013 as part of a multiple disaster scenario exercise featuring hazardous material events. In July 2013, the HRF provided additional support to the Atlanta police department in case of an incident at the Peachtree Road Race. The HRF will concluded the unit’s second external evaluation in December 2013 at Fort McClellan, Ala. The specialty skill sets within the HRF include: command and control, logistics support, communications, hazardous material operations, CBRN security, hazardous material detection and identification, collapsed structure and confined space rescue, personnel and equipment decontamination, medical triage and stabilization, and disaster mortuary affairs. Throughout 2014, the HRF will continue to partner with various local and state first responders to provide real-world training and maintain readiness for the next CBRN incident. Region 4 HRF Units The Georgia National Guard’s Region 4 Homeland Response Force (HRF) was selected as one of ten homeland response forces to support FEMA Region IV as a consequence management agency for chemical, biological, radiological, and/or nuclear (CBRN) incidents. The 201st Regional Support Group is the headquarters command of the Region 4 HRF, which changed unit designations from the 78th Troop Command on Oct. 1, 2013. The 201st RSG/ Region 4 HRF headquarters is located at the Clay National Guard Center in Marietta. Currently commanded by Col. Vernon Atkinson, the 201st Regional Support Group mission is to man, train, and equip a homeland response force to provide a response • 201st Regional Support Group, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • 4th Civil Support Team, Dobbins Air Reserve Base, Marietta • 170th Military Police Battalion, Decatur • 178th Military Police Company, Monroe • 190th Military Police Battalion, Kennesaw • 179th Military Police Company, Savannah • 278th Military Police Company, Fort Gordon • Joint Task Force 781 CERFP, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • 877th Engineer Company, Augusta • 870th Engineer Detachment, Decatur • 177th Engineer Company (TOPO), Dobbins Air Reserve Base, Marietta • 138th Chemical Company, Dobbins Air Reserve Base, Marietta • 202nd Explosive Ordnance Detachment, Marietta • 1177th Transportation Company, LaGrange • 248th Medical Company, Marietta • 116th and 165th Medical Groups HRF Accomplishments - 2013 -May 2013 Vigilant Guard exercise at Camp Blanding, Fla. -Dec. 2013 Second External Evaluation at Fort McClellan, Ala. 17 | Georgia Department of Defense
  19. 19. 78th Troop Command Commanded by Brig. Gen. Craig McGalliard since Oct. 1, 2013, the 78th Troop Command’s mission is to command, control, and supervise Georgia National Guard units attached to the troop command and to provide manned, trained and equipped units available for service in time of war or national emergency. The 78th Troop Command’s Senior Enlisted Advisor is Command Sergeant Major John Smiley. The 78th Troop Command also provided trained and ready troops to support overseas contingenc y operations. The 78th’s senior enlisted leader for 2013 is Command Sgt. Maj. John Smiley. Previously assigned the Homeland Response Force mission, it continues to support its stateside mission of providing Defense Support to Civil Authorities (DSCA) in times of disaster, and provides its subordinate units in support of Operations Enduring Freedom and New Dawn. T h e 2 0 1 s t R e g i on a l Supp or t Group (RSG) deployed early 2013 as Agribusiness Development Team III to Afghanistan and the 265th Regional Support Group (ADT II) and returned home to Metter, Ga. Nearly 190 Soldiers of the 1230th Transportation Company mobilized to Afghanistan the summer of 2013, marking their second mobilization since Sept. 11, 2001. The 179th MP Company returned 2013 from Afghanistan after a successful Kabul Base Cluster mission. The 278th MP Company and 1-214th Field Artillery deployed to Afghanistan in 2013. As p ar t of st ate p ar t ne rsh ip programs, the 110th Combat Service S u p p o r t B at t a l i o n f r o m T i f t o n supported several logistics missions in Africa while the 124th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment assisted the country of Georgia with their national disaster response plan and coverage of the 48th Infantry Brigade Combat Team’s exportable Combat Training Capability exercise. Brig. Gen. Craig McGalliard Commander 78th Troop Command Georgia Army National Guard 78th TC Units • 122nd Regional Training Institute, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • Regional Training Site-Maintenance, Georgia Garrison Training Center, Hinesville • 116th Army Band, Joint Forces Headquarters, Ellenwood • 124th Mobile Public Affairs Detachment, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • 161st History Detachment, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • 1962 Contracting Team, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • 139th Chaplain Detachment, Clay National Guard Center, Marietta • Headquarters Detachment, 265th Regional Support Group, Metter • Headquarters Detachment, 110th Combat Service Support Battalion, Tifton • 82nd Maintenance Company, Fort Benning, Columbus • 1148th Transportation Company, Fort Gordon, Augusta • 1177th Transportation Company, LaGrange • 1230th Transportation Company, Thomasville 2013 Annual Report | 18
  20. 20. Georgia Air National Guard Guardsmen of the Georgia Army and Air National Guard joined forces with the Army Reserve’s 310th Tactical Psychological Operations Company (Airborne) in a jump training exercise. 19 | Georgia Department of Defense
  21. 21. M aj . G en . T homas R. M oore Commander Georgia Air National Guard T he Georgia Air National Guard is always committed to its vision of developing top-tier Airmen and units to protect our nation across the spectrum of conflict and to protect its citizens from natural and manmade disasters with our joint services and interagency partners. Even with the uncertainty during sequestration, we will continue to maintain the high deployment tempo and level Chief Master Sgt. Joseph Greene State Command Chief Georgia Air National Guard of excellence expected of the more than 2,800 Airmen of the Georgia Air National Guard. Several of the Georgia Air Guard’s operational units deployed personnel and equipment throughout the year in support of global operations in addition to the units’ Air Expeditionary Force taskings. The Georgia Air Guard’s core missions are still in high-demand. The Georgia Air Guard’s largest unit, the 116th Air Control Wing (ACW) based at Robins Air Force Base, flying the E-8C Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System (JSTARS) aircraft, has continuously deployed aircraft and personnel in Southwest Asia for the last 12 years, amassing more than 94,000 flying hours in support of combatant commanders, with 8,800 being flown in 2013. The 165th Airlift Wing based in Savannah, flying the C-130H aircraft, has deployed aircraft and personnel to Iraq and Afghanistan, on average, every 18 months. In 2013, the unit flew more than 2,800 hours, 980 of which were flown in combat operations in the Middle East. In February, C-130 aircraft returned from a four-month deployment for the eleventh time in support of the War on Terror. Our geographically separated units also continued their support of the Global War on Terror in 2013. The 202nd Engineering Installation Squadron deployed for 180 days to support Forward Operating Locations in Iraq and Afghanistan.Twenty percent of Brunswick’s 224th Joint Communications Support Squadron mobilized for a six-month rotational deployment to support operational requirements in the USCENTCOM AOR. The 117th Air Control Squadron deployed 80 personnel to support OEF in Southwest Asia, and 25 of the 283rd Combat Communications Squadron returned from a six-month tasking to Southwest Asia. Although some of our units did not deploy this year, they did support real world taskings and important inspection, training and exercise operations in their regular and joint environments. The 165th Air Support Operations Squadron conducted its first Combined Unit Inspection, as well as support GA ARNG’s 48th IBCT during its XCTC exercise at Fort Stewart, GA. Several personnel from the 139th Intelligence Squadron were tasked to support Active Duty USAF and national intelligence missions at NSA/CSS Georgia and 1AF/AFNORTH. Members from the 116th Force Support Squadron participated in the 57th Presidential Inauguration by feeding more than 5000 guard members. The 530th Air Force Band, otherwise known as the Air National Guard Band of the South, concluded its 66-year history with a deactivation ceremony in September 2013. As of October 1, 2013, the trademark name and logo will be carried by the 572nd Air Force Band from Tennessee. When not deployed, our units continue to maintain mission readiness by taking an active role in supporting Georgia’s homeland defense and defense support to civil authorities’ missions. By providing unique capabilities – such as information awareness assessment, engineering, airlift and communications support – the Georgia Air Guard is well positioned to meet the growing demands of civil authorities. Our Airmen train regularly during exercises with the Georgia National Guard’s 78th Homeland Response Force; the 4th Civil Support Team; the Chemical, Biological, Radiological/ Nuclear, and Explosive enterprise; FEMA Region IV; other FEMA regions; and with our partners in the Georgia Emergency Management Agency. Our dual-status nature, with responsibilities to the state and federal government, makes our mission unique and provides the flexibility for both local and global response. In these times of fiscal constraint, we are expected to do more with less, but we will continue to provide highly motivated mission-ready forces for employment by the Governor and the United States Department of Defense. 2013 Annual Report | 20
  22. 22. 116th Air Control Wing Col. Kevin D. Clotfelter Commander 116th Airlift Wing With nearly 11 years of continuous deployment support to United States C entral C ommand and increasing involvement to all combatant commands, the116th Air Control Wing (ACW) c o nt i nu e s t o p rov i d e E - 8 C Jo i nt SurveillanceTarget Attack Radar System (JSTARS) aircraft as ‘a national asset’. The Command, Control, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance airborne platform detects, tracks, and solves problems to optimize the use of military force and safeguard American lives. Residing at Robins Air Force Base, Warner Robins, Georgia, JSTARS is the sole provider of the much lauded and persistently tasked E-8C fleet. The 116th ACW has been on a continuous deployment cycle since 9/11 and flown more than 86,000 combat hours with over 8,800 hours in deployed operations during the calendar year of 2013. The 116th ACW is established as the total force host and the Air National Guard lead for Team JSTARS with the 461st Air Control Wing providing Regular Air Force personnel to the ‘Active Associate’ construct.The 116th is considered a ‘Total Force’ expert, helping to meet future force construct demands. As we begin 2014, the 116th ACW and Team JSTARS is ready to meet the challenges that lie ahead, focusing on the core missions of Global Reach, Global Power, Global Vigilance. The wing was recently awarded its 17th Air Force Outstanding Unit Award, deploying close to 2,000 personnel who supported six United States combatant commanders during the highest operations tempo in the wing’s history. T h e 1 1 6 t h O p e r at i o n s G r o u p displayed unsurpassed combat readiness by deploying crews to five separate theaters within a 13-day window to supp or t shor t - not i c e d e pl oy me nt operations. Simultaneously, Team JSTARS conducted 10 C ombined Planning Operations Exercises along with seven Joint Air Sea Battle Exercises with Naval Forces. Team JSTARS has continued to set the pace by flying over 6,000 flight hours in support of DoD operations. The 116th OG continued its tradition of success by awarding an elite group the Georgia Medal for Valor, the Earl T. Ricks Leadership Award, the Lance P Sijan Leadership Award and the General George C. Kenney “Lessons Learned” Award. Superior maintenance and operations integration is at the core of effective flying. The 116th Maintenance Group’s 96 percent sortie completion rate increased aircraft availability to support critical missions around the globe in multiple overseas and domestic locations, surpassing an unprecedented 86,000 combat hours flown. The focus on maintenance earned the 2013 Secretary of the Air Force Field-level Maintenance Award for the 116th and 461st Aircraft Maintenance Squadrons. The 116th Mission Support Group also provides support, both overseas and abroad. The group’s Force Support, C o m mu n i c at i o n s , L o g i s t i c s , a n d Security Squadrons deployed personnel 21 | Georgia Department of Defense and provided logistics support to four Combatant Commands. At home, the MSG Contracting Office awarded over $5.4 million worth of contracts, insuring construction and repair projects,and commodities purchases were completed to meet mission requirements.The 116th Civil Engineering Squadron, an arm of the MSG, managed and maintained nearly 1M square feet of real property at Robins AFB and Dobbins ARB and coordinated over $2.4 million of sustainment, restoration and modernization projects. Making national headlines, Force Support fed more than 5,000 guard members assisting with the 57th Presidential Inauguration and the 116th Explosive Ordnance Flight interviewed as subject matter experts afterthe Boston Bombing. Epitomizing ‘Service Before Self ’, the synergistic efforts of three Security Forces personnel stepped into action to perform CPR on a Delta passenger in flight, saving her life. Maintaining a healthy force is always a challenge, but in 2013, the 116th Medical Group (MDG) prepared more than 550 members for deployment to prime locations and performed the important task of monitoring the medical status of flying personnel. The MDG is fully mission capable to respond to any emergency. The group also participated in four CBRNE Enhanced Rapid Force and Homeland Response Force exercises and evaluations to include Search and Extraction capabilities. Fifty ANG members earned qualifications in one or more of the following certifications: Basic Life Support, Advanced Cardiac Life Support, Pediatric Advanced Life Support, Trauma Nurse Core Course and PreHospital Trauma Life Support. During drill weekends, the116th MDG evaluated the health status of approximately 1,300 personnel. The men and women of the 116th ACW are proud to serve and consider it an honor to take an active role in their communities and in protecting thenation. The 116th’s reach spans globally because our support begins locally.The 116th continues to be always ready, always there, and always on target. Go Guard!
  23. 23. 165th Airlift Wing Georgia’s 165th Airlift Wing is located at Savannah International Airport and is composed of more than 900 men and women, who support, maintain and fly the unit’s eight C-130H “Hercules” aircraft. The mission of the 165th Airlift Wing is to provide tactical airlift of personnel, equipment and supplies. During 2013, aircraft and crews of the 165th flew missions to dozens of nations around the world. The unit maintains one of the highest aircraft operational readiness records in the National Guard and the U.S. Air Force. As a National Guard Wing, part of its dual-mission is also subject to be called upon for assistance during state emergencies to airlift food, medical supplies, equipment, and personnel domestically or internationally. These missions extend the emergency relief support during natural disasters such as floods, earthquakes, forest fires, search and rescue operations, and defense support to civil authorities. For example, after the devastation of Hurricane Sandy, 165th crews were on alert stand-by to aid victims in the northeast. Ultimately, other units were called to participate in these efforts, but Wing members were ready to answer the call if necessary. The 165th ser ves as the host base for Brunswick’s 224th Joint Communications Support Squadron, Hunter Army Air Field’s 117th Air Control Squadron, the 165th Air Support Operations Squadron, and the Combat Readiness Training Center both in Garden City, Ga. In January, the wing served as the lead unit in an operational readiness exercise. The wing was validated as a ready-to-deploy unit with a “satisfactory” rating. Immediately, the wing started preparing for a unit compliance inspection which was just recently completed, receiving a satisfactory grade. The war effort continued with twelve members of the 165th Small Air Terminal heading to Afghanistan for a five-month rotation with 25 members of the Civil Engineering Squadron and Fire Department. In 2013, the 165th flew more than 2,800 hours, of which 980 hours were flown in combat/combat support operations in the Middle East. This increased the wing’s combat experience to ten years of combat operations and well over 11,600 combat flight hours without a single mishap. In October 2012, the 165th C-130 aircraft began the more than 6,000mile journey for a four-month stint at an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia. This is the tenth time the 165th has deployed to the Middle East or Afghanistan in support of the War on Terror. Accompanying those aircraft were more than 85 Georgia Guard Airmen, including members of the Wing’s operations personnel and its maintenance department. This included four flying crews. In May and June 2013, the unit t o o k p a r t i n t w o S OU T HC OM Operation Coronet Oak deployments. The purpose of Coronet Oak is to resupply U.S. Operations in South and Central America. From April to June, it also provided one airlift and two crews to support Operation New Dawn, providing CONUS aeromedical transport for AMC. Since the beginning of operations in the Persian Gulf, the 165th has been integrally involved in air operations. Several elements of the Wing have deployed throughout the region, with Airman serving in Uzbekistan, Turkey, Kuwait, Iraq, and Afghanistan. Previously in 2009, the 165th deployed to Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. In 2005, the unit deployed aircraft and more than 100 personnel to KarshiKhanabad, Uzbekistan, for 11 months. During this period, the unit airlifted more than 35,660 tons of cargo in support of the War on Terror.It was initially called to active duty in 2003 in Col. James Edenfield Commander 165th Airlift Wing support of Operation Iraqi Freedom. Savannah’s C-130s were joined by additional C-130s from the Nevada and Delaware Air National Guard and attached the 737th Air Expeditionary Squadron to put aircraft in the air and move equipment, food and people in support of deployed operations. The Wing continues to receive numerous awards, including nine Air Force Outstanding Unit Awards, and enjoys the reputation of being one of the top airlift units in the nation. This is all directly attributed to the professionalism and esprit-de-corps of the Guardsmen who have served, and are now serving, within its ranks. 2013 Annual Report | 22
  24. 24. 117th Air Control Squadron Control of the highly charged and congested airspace over a given combat zone is the responsibility of the Georgia Air National Guard’s unique 117th Air Control Squadron (ACS), of Savannah. During exercises, contingencies, o r a c t u a l w a r, t h e 1 1 7 t h AC S’s command and control mission is to provide air control for military aircraft in their sector. As a Control and Reporting C enter, the 117th serves as the senior command and control element for the Theater Air Force Commander and directs the air war as assigned. Tr ai n e d ai r c ont rol l e rs h ave the responsibility of directing aircraft entering, exiting or crossing congested airspace using an array of sophisticated radar equipment and sensors that provide greater coverage than most small city airports. In fall 2013, the 117th mobilized 8 0 p e rs on nel on Tit l e 1 0 a c t ive dut y f or a 1 7 9 - d ay d e p l oy m e nt to Southwest Asia. The unit will coordinate with Army and Nav y forces to lead the regional air defense of the Persian Gulf area. The unit will track, identify, and control aircraft in assigned areas while executing the orders of the Combined Aerospace Operations Center. The unit will return in lateSpring 2014. 1 1 7 t h has supp or te d s e ve r a l test and communications for a l l AC S u n it s , and t he u n it has been selected again to be the first ACS to re ceive ne w upg rade d communications equipment based on their track record of excellence. The unit recently began supporting c om mu n i c at i ons for E me rge nc y O p erat ions C enter exercis es for Hunter Army Airfield. Tw i c e t h i s y e a r, 1 1 7 t h operations personnel went to Naval Air Station Fallon, Nevada to support Carrier Air Wing workups and wargames as they prepared for deployment to S outhwest Asia. This gave 117th operations personnel the opportunity to train with pilots from carrier groups that will be supported during the unit deployment 2013-2014. The 117th was also acknowledged for its community efforts in 2013: contributing over $1,000 to local charities and received recognition for its “top five participation” in the Combined Fe dera l C amp aig n, w it h a 100% contribution rate. 165th Air Support Operations Squadron Close Air Support (CAS) for advancing ground units is often critical in perilous combat environments like Afghanistan. The “Battlefield Airmen” of Garden City’s 165th Air Support O p erat ions S qu adron (ASOS) deploy with, advise and assist joint force commanders in planning, re qu e st i ng , c o ord i n at i ng an d controlling CAS, reconnaissance, and tactical airlift missions. In May 2013, the 165th ASOS conducted its first Combined Unit Inspection consisting of 9th Air Force STAN/EVAL and ACC Unit Compliance Inspection. The 165 ASOS was rated an “Excellent” overall with five members earning “Superior Performers” and an additional two members receiving the Inspector General coin. This performance far exceeded Air Force standards. While 2013 marked the first time since 2002 that the ASOS did not have members overseas supporting combat operations, the training and operations tempo has not slowed down. Members have conducted CAS training missions in Florida, Michigan New York, North Carolina and Townsend Bombing Range here in Georgia. Additionally, members went to Germany and Latvia to train on bombing ranges in those 23 | Georgia Department of Defense respective countries. In addition, the 165th ASOS deployed to Fort Stewart, Ga. to support the 48th Infantry Brigade C omb at Te am, G e org i a Ar my National Guard, during the latter’s XCTC in September, conducted annual training at Moody AFB, and graduated two members from Basic Airborne School at Fort Benning, Ga.
  25. 25. 224th Joint Communications Squadron The 224th Joint Communications Support Squadron (JCSS) provides communications support as directed by the United States Transportation C ommand, Air Force Space Command, and Ga. DoD. It is one of six active, reserve and Air National Guard units assigned to the Joint Communications Support Element. In 2013, the 224th JCSS mobilized 20% of its Airmen for a six-month rotational deployment in support of operational requirements in the U.S Central Command’s area of responsibility. Four Bronze Stars, ten Joint Service Commendation Medals, and eight Joint Service Achievement Medals were awarded 283rd Combat Communications Squadron G e o r g i a’s 2 8 3 r d C o m b a t C ommunications S quadron is responsible for “first-in” rapid deployment and “build-up” of an integrated force with state-of-theart communications equipment and multi-skilled personnel. The unit provides scalable command and control, i nte l l i ge n c e, s u r ve i l l an c e an d reconnaissance,and information operationscapabilities to expeditionary air and space forces for any contingency operation. The 283rd recently returned from a six-month Joint to 224th Airman for contributions to the success of numerous direct action combat missions of supported Joint Task Forces. During this deployment, the 224th embarked on a five-month humanitarian mission aboard the USS Pearl Harbor to six IndoPacific countries in Samoa, Tonga, the Marshall Islands, Kiribati, the Solomon Islands and Papua New Guinea. Their actions enabled the command element to provide remote communications and track move ments of 793 p ers onnel t hroug hout t he mission. The squadron’s level of support to civil authorities in 2013 was also impressive, providing direct support to NORTHC OM/CYBERC OM homeland defense missions. The Citizen-Airmen of the 224th JCSS consistently displayed unwaver ing commit ment and preparedness to respond to both domestic and federal missions. The men and women of the 224th s h ow e d p r o f e s s i o n a l i s m a n d dedication, responding to both contingency and humanitarian operations while maintaining readiness to respond to any possible domestic threat. Additionally, the squadron generously responded to community needs, donating more than 500 hours, $20,000 and 57 pints of blood, to a variety of charities. They continue to personify the Citizen Soldier on the battlefield and in the local community. Expeditionary Tasking in Southwest Asia. Located in Marietta, Ga., the 283rd is perfectly situated for a quick response anywhere in theregion. 2013 Annual Report | 24
  26. 26. 139th Intelligence Squadron The primary mission of the 139th Intelligence Squadron (IS) is to execute cryptologic intelligence operations to satisfy strategic, operational and tactical intelligence requirements of national decision makers, combatant commands, combat operations, plans and forces. Additionally, the 139th IS has the state mission to provide a trained and equipped force to assist the citizens of Georgia in times of emergency. The 45-member intelligence squadron employs 38 traditional and seven full-time Guardsmen. The unit fits the total force initiative “classic associate” squadron model of t he Air Force by work ing alongside the Active Duty’s 480th Intelligence, Sur veillance, and Reconnaissance Group at Fort Gordon. The 139th IS is tasked to support two distinct USAF missions: the Distributed Common Ground System and NationalTactical Integration. Following its standup in 2008 as Detachment1, 116th Air Control Wing, the 139th IS was federally recognized as a USAF Squadron in 2010, and also declared initial operational capability in 2010. Full operational capability is expected to be reached in late 2014. The 139th IS continued a high operational mission tempo in 2013, with several personnel tasked to support active duty USAF and national intelligence missions at NSA/CSS Georgia and 1AF/ AFNORTH. Additionally, two personnel augmented the 117th Air Control Squadron’s deployment t o C E N T C OM . T S g t Tr av i s Huffman won NSA/CSS’s National Threat Operations Center Military Performer of the Quarter for 1st Quarter 2013. The amount and variance of operational support was quite extensive across the spectrum. 139 IS was recognized with its first Air Force Outstanding Unit Award in 2013 for achievements during the Feb 2010-May 2011 timeframe. The 139th IS also continues to support regular production of the nation of Georgia’s diplomatic, i n for m at i on a l , m i l it ar y, an d e c o n o m i c s u m m a r y, w h i c h supports the Adjutant General and Georgia Department of Defense staffs in their efforts with the State Partnership Program. 202nd Engineering Installation Squadron T h e e n g i n e e r i n g , installation, removal, relocation, repair and serviceability of sophisticated command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, sur veillance, and reconnaissance systems at Air Force inst al lat ions worldwide is the responsibility of the men and women of the 202nd Engineering Installation Squadron (EIS) headquartered at Robins Air Force Base. The unit also provides disaster relief and assists state authorities during emergencies by providing d i s a s t e r r e c o v e r y, r e s t o r a t i o n a n d re p a i r of G a . D o D, f e d e r a l and civil communcations infrastructure. The unit spent much of 2013 preparing for the AFSPC Un it C omp l i an c e Ins p e c t i on and preparing for real world deployments.Beginning in O c t o b e r, t h e u n it m o bi l i z e d 2 7 Airmen for a 180-day “bootson-the ground” deployment to the Middle East supporting For ward Op erating L o cations in Afghanistan. Residing at Robins Air Forc e B a s e , War n e r R o bi ns , G a the unit consists of 111 highly 25 | Georgia Department of Defense skilled technicians (11 of w hom are full-time) specializing in communications support for nine Air Guard bases and 21 g e o g r ap h i c a l l y s e p a r at e d u n i t s in the southeast region of the Un it e d St at e s , P u e r t o R i c o a n d t h e U. S . Vi r g i n I s l a n d s . T h i s exceptional team ensures the s qu a d ron l i ve s up t o it s m ott o : “G l o b a l Te c h n i c i a n s , A ny t i m e Anywhere.”
  27. 27. 530th Air Force Band The 530th Air Force Band (also known as the Air National Guard Band of the South) support global Air Force and Air National Guard missions by fostering patriotism and communicating a strategic message by performing musical services for the military community as well as the general public. The unit was officially inactivated October 1, 2013. Major Alan McConnell relinquished command to Major General Thomas Moore, and the few remaining and former members were recognized for Combat Readiness Training Center Lieutenant Colonel Thomas Gr ab ow sk i assu me d c om mand of Savannah’s Combat Readiness Training Center in 2013, a place where the only constant in the past year has been change. The threatened personnel cuts of early 2012 took effect in FY 2013. A unit totaling 85 lost 26 of its fulltime personnel – a total of more than 450 years combined military experience. Still, the unit’s strategic vision did not change, nor the demands placed upon it. While absorbing the staff reductions, the CRTC made a concerted effort to lean forward in a number of areas which will continue to pay dividends to the state and Total Force far beyond the foreseeable future. Colonel Todd Freesemann’s initiative legitimized the CRTC’s indigenous Cyber Training School throughout the Air Force. The staff, working with Air Education Training Command (AETC), commenced the arduous task of accrediting the only Air National Guard Cyber Training Facility which included their contributions. Prior to inactivation, the band was reduced in size but remained active by using four ensembles to fulfill mission requests in three states. The band’s final community performance was a Memorial Day parade in Savannah, Ga., with its final official performance at Air Headquarters Family Day celebration in July at Clay National Guard Center. Up on i n a c t iv at i on , t he b an d s marketing name, “The Air National Guard Band of the South,” its brand and mission were transferred to the 572nd Air Force Band, located in Tennessee. The Air National Guard Band of the South’s rich history will always be a part of the heritage of the Georgia Air National Guard. each instructor achieving professorial status so students attending the cyber courses would not only receive AFSC credit, but also college credit through the Community College of the Air Force. The school now has two ‘regular’ Air Force instructors permanently assigned to the team, joining the resident ANG staff of the CRTC, a feat not seen elsewhere in the Guard. The continuing efforts by the Marine Corps to expand Townsend Bombing Range moved forward in FY 2013 as Town Hall meetings were conducted to better brief the public and our neighbors in Long and McIntosh Counties of the possibilities in store. At present, Townsend owns a 5K acre footprint, but with the now-allocated congressional funding, the Range is expected to grow to nearly 32K acres, facilitating the needs of the F-35’s scheduled arrival at MCAS Beaufort in late 2014. At the same time, Air Force JTACS are training on the range, working with fighter aircraft from the Air Force, ANG, Marines and Navy. The local presence of the 165th ASOS continues to attract other ground units to the range from other bases/services. The CRTC’s continuing flexibility allows it to improve its Air Combat Maneuvering Instrumentation with advancing technologies, providing today’s air warrior with exceptional logistical support and the most realistic electronic war environment utilizing Joint Threat Emitters and link capability ensuring they remain on the leading edge of the nation’s ability to bring the air battle to the enemy, regardless of the fighter airframe. Finally, in years past the Remagen DZ at Fort Stewart had been an exceptionally critical training area for C-130 pilots needing Assault Landing training on a dirt strip. Over the past several years of war, C-130 crews have continued this activity in the theater of operations, but in the days of the drawdown, these same pilots will be required to continue this skill. Realizing this need, CRTC command determined the Remagen DZ could once again become a valuable commodity. Working with Ft. Stewart command, and a hybrid ANG/US Army Red Horse Civil Engineering Squadron from New Mexico, the old DZ has returned to life and the first C-130s are scheduled to land there in January 2014. 2013 Annual Report | 26
  28. 28. Georgia State Defense Force Brig. General Tom Commanding General Danielson Georgia State Defense Force When ordered by the Adjutant General, the Georgia State Defense Force (GSDF) provides an organized, trained, disciplined, rapid response, uniformed force. GSDF volunteers respond to needs and emergency situations as defined by the Adjutant General and the Governor, and assist local authorities where such missions do not conflict, as authorized under the Official Code of Georgia, Title 38. In 2013, the GSDF ran its first formal National Association for Search and Rescue certification course for select Search and Rescue Specialization II personnel, while at the same time modernizing training courses across all spectrums of the GSDF force. More than 400 GSDF volunteers met at Fort Stewart to participate in their Annual Training (AT), creating a realistic exercise putting the totality of each unit’s training into action. AT 2013 was designed as a force-wide search and rescue mission run as an Army Readiness Training Evaluation Program. In 2013, the GSDF continued to run nationally recognized search and rescue courses as well as Officer Candidate School, Captain/Warrant Officer Candidate School, soldier leadership and numerous Initial Entry Training courses. GSDF also stood up its own Military Entrance Processing Station. Other highlights for the organization in 2013 include its support of the Georgia Army National Guard 171st Aviation at their annual training; providing search and rescue support to the Jenkins County Emergency Management Agency; assisting the Georgia Army National Guard in testing its tactical communications through a communications exercise and participating in several OPFOR exercises in support of Georgia National Guard deployment at Clay National Guard Center in Marietta and Ft. Stewart, GA. Prior-service veterans comprise approximately 33 percent of the GSDF force. State Defense Force members act as a force-multiplier to 27 | Georgia Department of Defense the Ga. DoD, capable of immediate response whenever they may be needed, assisting with everything from search and rescue missions, to disaster relief efforts, to helping reunite redeploying Guardsmen with their families. When called upon, the GSDF volunteers also provide a variety of support functions for the Georgia National Guard including family support, legal assistance, medical and chaplaincy support, and technical assistance in a variety of other areas. The GSDF also performs defense support to civil authority missions such as evacuation and control during natural disasters, perimeter safety, and medical assistance at major public events. The Georgia State Defense Force provides a wide variety of training and educational opportunities – from military operations to Community Emergency Response Team training – for its own personnel as well as the personnel of the Georgia National Guard. The strong working relationship with the Georgia National Guard allows the GSDF to remain relevant and ready to serve the state and its citizens, now and long into the future.
  29. 29. Members of the Georgia State Defense Force (GSDF) unload a simulated casualty during a medical evacuation (MEDEVAC) training exercise 2013 Annual Report | 28
  30. 30. Joint Staff Brig. General John King Director Joint Staff Division, Strategic Management Office, and the State Partnership Program (SPP). The Family Programs Division is responsible for planning, developing, supervising, and directing family programs for the Georgia National Guard and Reserve members and their families. This includes families of all deployed military personnel – regardless of service component – during all levels of contingency and mobilization operations throughout the state. This division also advises the Adjutant General on matters relating to family readiness and quality of life and is instrumental in assisting service members seeking employment. The Strategic Management Office advises the Adjutant General on matters relating to organizational self-improvement. This office uses several programs throughout the year such as the Army Performance The Ga. DoD Joint Staff is responsible for the strategic management, leadership, and direction of the Georgia Department of Defense, which includes the Ga. Army National Guard, the Ga. Air National Guard, and the Ga. State Defense Force. The Joint Staff provides the Adjutant General with time-sensitive intelligence and information and seeks to build the strength of the Ga. DoD through internal and external partnerships. While the primary mission of the Joint Staff is providing defense support to civil authorities, homeland security, and homeland defense, it provides leadership in several other areas. The Joint Staff has oversight of the Ga. DoD’s Family Programs 29 | Georgia Department of Defense Improvement Criteria, the Malcom Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence, and the Managers’ Internal Control Program to continually improve the efficiency and effectiveness of business processes in the organization. The State Partnership Program provides unique partnership capacity-building capabilities to combatant commanders and U.S. ambassadors through partnerships between U.S. states, territories and the District of Columbia and foreign countries. The SPP supports U.S. national interests and security cooperation goals by engaging partner nations via military, sociopolitical and economic conduits at the local, state and national level. The state of Georgia’s partner is the country of Georgia. This partnership was one of the first SPP partnerships established in the program and the Georgia DoD routinely conducts several engagements throughout the year as part of the SPP mission. The Georgia National Guard’s Joint Force Headquarters located on Clay National Guard Center.
  31. 31. 1st Lt. Monicia Porter, a native of Thomasville, Ga., with the 1230th Transportation Company in support of the 524th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, Task Force Lifeliner, 1st Sustainment Command (Theater), at Camp Marmal, Afghanistan, ground guides one of her platoon’s vehicles out of their motor pool in preparation to conduct a sustainment and retrograde support mission to a remote location in Northern Afghanistan. 2013 Annual Report | 30
  32. 32. Defense Support of Civil Authorities The Georgia Department of Defense is always ready to provide support to the Georgia Emergency Management Agency (GEMA) and the citizens of Georgia in the event of natural and/or manmade disasters. We do this by maintaining relationships, developing and subsequently refining our written plans, conducting exercises and supporting real world events. There are several conferences we also make sure to attend annually that help us stay at the forefront of emerging initiatives in emergency preparedness. In April 2013, we participated in U.S. Northern Command Annual Interagency Hurricane Table Top Exercise hosted by U.S. Army North in San Antonio, Texas. This exercise focused on synchronization across state and federal agencies, the purpose being to present Interagency Partners the capabilities each entity brings to the response and the method by which they bring those capabilities. This allows all domestic operations officers from the National Guard’s hurricane States and territories to come together to discuss their plans, preparedness and exercises in order to ensure the National Guard is always ready. The Georgia Department of Defense also has representation at GEMA’s Emergency Managers Association Group meetings and their seasonal preparedness meetings at the State Operations Center. At the Georgia Department of Defense, we continually develop and refine our written emergency operations plans by conducting Joint Planning Group meetings throughout the year and by conducting external reviews of our plans. We work with other agencies in order to share and discuss those plans. For example, in 2013, we shared our plans with the Georgia Department of Public Health, Georgia Emergency Management Agency, the Alabama National Guard and the Florida National Guard. The most effective way to remain prepared for natural or manmade disasters is to conduct various exercises. The Georgia Department of Defense participated in many emergency response exercises throughout 2013. In addition to participating in the U.S. Northern Command Annual Interagency Hurricane Table Top Exercise, we also participated in exercises, Ardent Sentry and Vigilant Guard in May 2013. Exercise Ardent Sentry was a bilateral exercise that involved numerous federal, provincial, state and local agencies in Canada and the U.S. The exercise focused primarily on Defense Support of Civil Authorities, but contained elements of the Homeland Defense mission as well. The primary objective of the exercise was to give federal, provincial, state and local authorities the opportunity to work together across a full spectrum of training opportunities to better prepare participants to respond to state and national crises. The exercise stressed consequence 31 | Georgia Department of Defense management for a range of manmade and natural disasters. Elements of the Georgia National Guard also traveled to Florida in May to participate in Exercise Vigilant Guard, which is an annual interagency training drill. Along with state and local first responders, members of the Georgia and Florida National Guard trained together in this scenario-based exercise to reinforce the relationship needed to support the needs of citizens during domestic emergencies. During the month of May, the Ga. DoD participated in GEMA’s 2013 Hurricane Exercise. In June we conducted an internal tornado scenario exercise in order to prepare ourselves for the potential of tornado emergencies in the state of Georgia. During 2013, the Georgia Department of Defense provided support to civil authorities during real-world events, as well. Our Joint Staff sent representatives to the Fulton County Emergency Operations center in support of the Peachtree Road Race. Our 4th Civil Support Team and the 116th Air Control Wing’s Explosive Ordnance Disposal Team supported local, state, and federal authorities throughout the year on a variety of civil support operations. The Georgia Department of Defense stays ready to support the state of Georgia and its citizens through our attendance at conferences, our development and refining of our written plans, by conducting exercises and by supporting real world events. The Georgia Department of Defense will always be ready to provide defense support to civil authorities.
  33. 33. 78th Homeland Response Force participates in training exercises during Vigilant Guard 2013. 2013 Annual Report | 32
  34. 34. 4th WMD Civil Support Team T he 22 personnel of the 4th Weapons of Mass D e st r u c t i on ( W M D ) C i v i l S u p p o r t Te a m (CST) provide support to civil authorities at domestic chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear ( C BR N ) i nc i d e nt s ite s by of fe r i ng identification and assessment of hazards. They also advise civil authorities and facilitate the arrival of follow-on military forces during emergencies and incidents of WMD ter ror ism, intent iona l or unintentional release of CBRN materials, and natural or man-made disasters that result in, or could result in, catastrophic loss of life or property. The 4th WMDCST complements and enhances, but does not duplicate, state CBRN response capabilities. The Adjutant General can either employ the 4th WMD-CST to support the state response under the direction of the governor or aid in another state’s request for response under another governor. The 4th WMD-CST is comprised of full-time Army and Air National Guard p ers onnel. The str uc ture of the unit is divided into six sections: command; operations; communications; a d m i n i s t r at i on / l o g i s t i c s ; m e d i c a l / analytical; and survey. E ach WMD-CST deploys to an incident site using its internally assigned vehicles, which include a command vehicle, operations trailer, and a communications platform called the unified command suite. This command suite provides a broad spectrum of secure communications capabilities the 4th WMD-CST also can deploy with an analytical laboratory system vehicle containing a full suite of analytical equipment to support the characterization of hazards and several general-purpose vehicles. The CST can be moved by air, rail, commercial truck or ship. The 4th WMD-CST was one of the first ten WMD-CST units originally established by the U.S. Department of Defense. In 2013, Georgia’s 4th WMD-CST was active across the state training with first responders at Cobb County Safety Village, providing vital support for largedraw events, technical assistance for Secret Service appointed National Special Security Event (NSSE) with Defense Support to Civil Authorities (DSCA) for the National Democratic Convention, support of other National Level Exercises. Also in 2013, the 4th WMD-CST participated in a WMD training exercise with the Office of Secure Transportation (OST) with the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The exercise underscored the value the CST brings to the state and other federal agencies in the event that a CBRN incident exceeds the capability of local responders to control. For large draw events, the unit provided numerous sweeps and technical support to Atlanta first responders during events such as the Atlanta Falcons 2013 season games at the Georgia Dome and to the Atlanta Police Department for the 2013 Peachtree Road Race. The 4th WMDCST also provided demonstration and capabilities briefs with local and state first responders at the Albany Marine Corps Logistics Base. The 4th WMD-CST can deploy 24 hours a day, 365 days a year to assist the State of Georgia and other FEMA Region 4 states. Staff Sgt. Jonathon Dean, survey team chief, and Sgt. 1st Class Deric Richardson, survey CBRN non-commissioned officer in charge, briefed and advised local first responders during a radiological exercise at Georgia State University. 33 | Georgia Department of Defense
  35. 35. Staff Sgt. Natasha Daniels swept 4th CST entry team Guardsmen with a pancake radiation detector for any traces of contamination during the radiological training exercise with GSU and local first responders. Cobb County Fire and Emergency Services participated in a first responder joint exercise hosted by the Georgia National Guard’s 4th Civil Support Team along with other local, state and federal agencies. Jake Robitzsch and Ken Singleton “evacuate” South Carolina National Guard Sgt. Joseph Berendzen, Jr. to a nearby utility vehicle for transport to Kennestone Hospital as part of the 4th CST’s joint first responder exercise at Cobb County Safety Village. Georgia National Guard 4th CST team members suited up to approach the radiological source and make entry into the building. 2013 Annual Report | 34
  36. 36. Counterdrug Task Force The Georgia National Guard C ounterdrug Task Force (GANGCDTF) conducts full spectrum law enforcement support operations which bridge the gap between Department of Defense and civil authorities in the fight against illicit drugs and transnational threats to the homeland. The GANGCDTF contributes military support for local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies and community based organizations in addition to their parent combatant commanders. The GANGCDTF’s mission is to reduce the supply and demand for illegal drugs by fostering relationships and partnering with law enforcement, communit y organizat ions, and school districts. The GANGCDTF is comprised of over 40 members of both the Ga. Army National Guard and Ga. Air National Guard, who assist law enforcement agencies specifically through illegal narcotic and property s e i z u re op e r at i on s , m a r iju a n a eradication missions, information and trend analysis, case support and antidrug classroom instruction. The GANGCDTF contributed to the following drug, property, and currency seizures in FY 2013: 2,349 lbs of cocaine valued in excess of $37.2 million; 2,634 ecstasy pills valued in excess of $65,850; 14,640 lbs of marijuana valued in excess of $43.9 million; 766 lbs of methamphetamine valued in excess of $15.3 million; property in excess of $3.9 million, and Air crew members from Georgia’s Army National Guard Counter Drug Task Force (CDTF) patrolled the skies north of Rome, Ga. looking for marijuana. Their efforts resulted in their harvesting over 20 plants thereby keeping $40,000 of maijuana off the streets of Georgia. 35 | Georgia Department of Defense currency in excess of $19.8 million. In addition to the $120.2 million in drug related contraband, the GANGCDTF assisted in the arrest of 1,185 drug related suspects. Notably, in the fall of 2013 an Airmen attached to Federal Aviation Administration assisted in the tracking and apprehension of four aircraft valued at $1.6 million and the seizure of over 694 lbs of cocaine valued in excess of $11 million in a single operation. Our marijuana eradication efforts in FY 2013 resulted in the detection and destruction of over 9,544 plants valued in excess in $23.8 million. The GANGCDTF continues to perform as one of the most successful Counter Drug Task Forces in the country assisting in nearly $144 million in drug related seizures in FY 2013.
  37. 37. Public Affairs T h e G e or g i a D e p a r t m e nt of Defense Public Affairs Office supp or ts t he 15,000 memb er organization The State Public Affairs Office fulfills the Georgia DoD ‘s obligation to engage the public, key stake holders and the command in order to both inform internal and external audiences through varied trusted lines of communications means and methods and provide valued community relations in order to set conditions for situational awareness of GaDoD activities , capabilities and to garner support for GaDoD strategic goals. The Georgia Guard continues to be a DOD leader in online presence and interactivity. Recognized as the owner of one of the premier websites in the entire Department of the Army, The Georgia Guard was also designated as a Keith L. Ware award winner in the Command Blog category. The Professional Guardsman was recognized as the third best in the entire Army component to include active, reserve and Guard units in all States and territories. Public Affairs staff members were also recognized for individual contributions in the Keith L. Ware competition. The Georgia Guardsman’s Historic Battle Review column received an honorable mention for individual writing in the article series categor y. Meanwhile, the Georgia Guard Public Affairs Officer contributed writing and imagery to Best Field Newspaper Keith L. Ware award winning Keris Strike newsletter which documented the 560th BFSB’s training mission in Malaysia. It is said that a picture is worth a thousand words and it would appear that the public and the media agree as Georgia Guard public affairs crossed a milestone on Veterans Day with the one millionth view of its high-resolution image collection on Flickr. In just over a year, Flickr site traffic doubled and images of the Georgia National Guard were distributed by media outlets across the nation. Georgia Guard images were instrumental in the National Guard Bureau’s 377th Birthday and Honor their Service campaigns. An image from the return ceremony of ADT-III was even featured on the Country Music Awards. Production of the Georgia Guardsman magazine entered its 60th year in November. Six decades of Georgia Guardsman magazines are maintained on a digital archive accessible through the Georgia Guard’s home page. This resource continues to provide historical context of the Guard’s mission and relevance through the years. Sequestration had a devastating impact on community relations. In the course of 2013, the Georgia Guard was forced to decline support to more than 120 requests for static displays, band appearances, and guest speakers. These public events are crucial to building the bridge between the military and the public as all too often the general public does not have the opportunity to interact with uniformed military personnel. In lieu of the opportunity to communicate face-to-face, the Georgia Guard concentrated on its social media presence and observed a 21% increase in its Facebook reach among key demographics. Already the second-most followed National Guard state on Twitter, the Georgia Guard added more than 3,000 followers – nearly doubling its total from the previous year. 2013 Annual Report | 36
  38. 38. Emerging Missions Na t i o n a l G u a r d s m e n h a v e a unique blend of civilian and military skills. It is this dual, CitizenSoldier nature and temperament of Guardsmen which allows them to be so effective when conducting missions. A Guardsman not only provides combatant commanders with a trained military professional but, as a bonus, Guardsmen bring a myriad of civilian skills and experiences to the battlefield. The National Guard has conducted missions in E astern Europe, South America, Africa, and Central America for over two decades and is heavily involved in the warfight in Afghanistan. Agribusiness Development Teams Agribusiness Development Teams (ADTs) are a collaborative effort of the Network Science Center at West Point (NSC), and the National Guard Bureau’s ADT Mission. The Army National Guard has employed the Agribusiness Development Team (ADT) concept successfully in Central America for approximately 20 years. The National Guard Bureau has completed significant planning to provide the Coalition Joint Task Force (CJTF) commander with a resource to favorably impact the agribusiness sector, and the ADT so far has been very well received and has been very busy passing along agricultural knowledge, providing security forces (SECFOR), and hard work as well. The Georgia ADTs are composed of Army National Guard Soldiers and Airmen with backgrounds and The State Partnership Program, agribusiness development teams and training and reconstruction teams are excellent examples of the National Guard using civilian skills to support the geographical combatant commanders’ theater campaign plans. Helping civilian populations through noncombat initiatives is nothing new to the Georgia National Gu ard . In t h e War on Te r ror, Guardsmen have helped Iraqis and Afghans improve infrastructure, advance law enforcement, bring utilities to towns and villages, and enhance relationships with local leaders. For example, as 2013 came to a close, Georgia Guard engineers used their military and engineering skills to make the roads safer in Afghanistan. The 1230th Transportation Company was one of the last Coalition units in Kunduz, Afghanistan prior to the transfer of authority to the civil authorities in the region. Last year, Guardsmen with the 560th BFSB traveled literally half way around the world to mentor the Malaysian Army in peacekeeping op erations. Three agribusiness development teams with the 201st HRF have deployed to Afghanistan to teach the farmers there sustainable agriculture techniques. And our 18year State Partnership Program with the nation of Georgia continues, as that country became the largest nonNATO contributor to the fight in Afghanistan. Georgia’s Guardsmen have proven themselves repeatedly in combat as well as in humanitarian and domestic response missions. They consistently perform at the professional level that the state and nation expects. expertise in various sectors of the agribusiness field and have been formed to provide training and advice to Afghan universities, provincial ministries, and local farmers. ADT members also bring personal ties and relationships that allow them to leverage the assets and expertise of Land Grant Universities (LGUs) and Cooperative Extension Services within their home state. The ADT undertook and completed projects to improve the expertise of Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation, and Livestock (MAIL) employees and the general knowledge of farmers in the area. Specific areas of expertise and experience for the ADT members i nclud e ag r i c u ltu re ( t ra dit i ona l farming), horticulture (orchards and vineyards), pest management, irrigation, animal husbandry, food processing, marketing, agricultural engineering, soil science, ice production, and storage. The Georgia National Guard committed to a three-year obligation to provide ADTs in Afghanistan. The first of these deployed for southeastern Afghanistan in the spring of 2011. The majority of the service members come from the 201st Regional Support Group and the 265th Regional Support Group. In preparation for that deployment, the Georgia Guardsmen have used the new language lab at Clay National Guard center to improve their understanding of the Pashto and Dari languages used in Afghanistan. The University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences provided additional agriculture training and technical expertise at the Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College in Tifton. The ADT III completed the last mission for Georgia in November 2013. They conducted 211 missions across northern Helmand province to include agriculture, pest management, and veterinary training with district and provincial staff, plus developed an agricultural radio program to reach remote communities. 37 | Georgia Department of Defense
  39. 39. State Partnership Program with the Country of Georgia The State Partnership Program’s purpose is to establish enduring civilmilitary relationships in order to improve international security and build partnership capacity across all levels of society. In 2013, the partnership’s eighteenth year, this was accomplished in three ways: verifying Georgia’s disaster response capability, preparing Georgian Soldiers to contribute to coalition combat operations, and developing a long-term amputee care capability. “…We cannot count on full success without the establishment and activation of vitally important state institutions… for we strongly believe that your assistance and support of our initiative will undoubtedly strengthen Georgia’s fledgling democratic institutions and will help us become active members of the family of nations.” (Dr. P. Chkheidze, Permanent Representative; Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Letter to the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, John M. Shalikashvili, dated August 31, 1994) The Georgia National Guard supported Exercise Shared Horizons, a multinational disaster response exercise sponsored by US European Command. The exercise focused on expanding Georgia’s disaster response capability towards a regional disaster response framework in the South Caucasus. The success of this exercise, in its final year, verified Georgia’s regional disaster response hegemony. The Country of Georgia is the largest non-NATO contributor of forces to International Security Forces – Afghanistan (ISAF). The successful conclusion of the Georgia Train and Support Team (GTST) mission after three rotations is a testament to the Georgia National Guard’s commitment to the country’s successful participation. Georgian Soldiers continue to own battle space in Afghanistan and Georgia is capable of providing interoperable, effective combat forces for coalition operations. Improved disaster response and combat capabilities enhance Georgia’s global interoperability and are key ingredients for Georgia’s NATO aspirations. Our Georgian partners are now ready to consider exporting these capabilities and, in keeping with Dr. Chkheidze’s wishes, “become active members of the family of nations”. The State of Georgia also provided project management of the Building Amputee Care – Georgia (BAC-G) program. This program builds Georgia’s ability to provide effective long-term care for amputees. It also improves the effectiveness of the care by minimizing the cost and time to transport soldiers to a care facility outside of Georgia. This, in turn, allows finite resources to focus on care and not administrative and logistical costs of transport and remote administration. This one-of-a-kind program is supported at the highest levels of government and is heralded as a model of success. For 2014, the State Partnership Program will continue to build on past successes while vigilantly seeking out and exploring emerging opportunities to leverage U.S. strategy, develop additional partnerships, and enhance global security. 2013 Annual Report | 38

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